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Show us your RV-14 panel

Hi all,
I thought I might share my progress on the RV-14 panel. I have fabricated some backlit "sub-panels" and I am very excited with the results! It's all homemade, using laser engraver paint, acrylic, and flexible LED strings.


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Wow….that’s very nice!!
 
Finished! I think :)

1.jpeg 2.jpeg 3.jpeg 4.jpeg

5.jpeg


Note the coolest: TO/GA button inside the throttle lever in the center console :D
 
Last edited:
My FINAL....I think, v3.6 Panel

Putting power to it tomorrow for the first time. Hopefully, there won't be too much smoke!

Panel v3.6.jpg

Subpanel Wiring Top View All v3.6 Panel.jpg
 
Finished! I think :)

Note the coolest: TO/GA button inside the throttle lever in the center console :D

Nice panel! It has a bizjet/airliner look to it. Did DJM provide the throttle quadrant with the TOGA button, or did you do that mod yourself? How is the wiring routed down along the throttle lever to protect it from damage?

Also, do you have your seats done yet, and if so, what do you think about the placement of the throttle in the Aerosport console from an ergonomics perspective? I've been thinking about using this setup on my -14 but it looks like it's located further aft than ideal...but I haven't had a chance to sit in a -14 with that console & throttle to check out the ergonomics for myself. I'm also mulling the pros/cons of having to route the throttle/prop/mixt cables down through the tunnel along with everything else in there (not only the initial installation effort but long term maintenance aspects as well). Looks cool though!
 
Nice panel! It has a bizjet/airliner look to it. Did DJM provide the throttle quadrant with the TOGA button, or did you do that mod yourself? How is the wiring routed down along the throttle lever to protect it from damage?

Also, do you have your seats done yet, and if so, what do you think about the placement of the throttle in the Aerosport console from an ergonomics perspective? I've been thinking about using this setup on my -14 but it looks like it's located further aft than ideal...but I haven't had a chance to sit in a -14 with that console & throttle to check out the ergonomics for myself. I'm also mulling the pros/cons of having to route the throttle/prop/mixt cables down through the tunnel along with everything else in there (not only the initial installation effort but long term maintenance aspects as well). Looks cool though!

Hi Mark,

I fabricated the TOGA button from scratch. I have detailed pictures on my builder's blog if you want to check it out. I ran only 1 wire in the forward face of the throttle lever down through the lever slot. it is invisible and protected by the end travel point of the cable, which should not reach the end of the slot anyway. The ground is done with the body of the lever.

I really like the ergonomics of aerosport armrest and throttle. I think it should be stock in the RV14. :) it does not take space away and creates a comfortable separation between the pilot and co-pilot seats.

I haven't routed the actual control cables yet, but I honestly think it will be easier than the stock setup. there are fewer turns and the firewall passthrough is really well aligned with the center column.

I also moved the cowl flap lever to the center console (fuse box) with a straight cable downwards, through the old exhaust tunnel. much smoother operation than Vans stock design.

As far as maintenance goes, the armrest is removable and the throttles are not screwed to it. it is fixed to the cockpit floor. so maintenance is easy.

Check out the pics on my build log. I have many many pics there.

Reach out if any questions!

The only thing missing now is to cover the armrest with the same material as the side panels. (will ask Classic Aero to do it all for me)

https://eaabuilderslog.org/?blprojentry&proj=7j9A7KOpI&e=88ZqC30Qi&listcat=&sid=
 
Note the coolest: TO/GA button inside the throttle lever in the center console :D

Hard to tell from the photo... how far recessed into the throttle grip is the end of the pushbutton? I might be concerned about accidentally bumping it.
 
Hard to tell from the photo... how far recessed into the throttle grip is the end of the pushbutton? I might be concerned about accidentally bumping it.

The switch fits entirely inside the throttle handle. Could have done it fully recessed. But I decided to make it 1/4 inch past the handle side.

Ergonomically, doesn’t seem like easy to accidentally press it. The handle is far from the resting position of the right leg.

Time/usage will tell. But I can recess it later if needed.
 
Hola Carlos,

These are the same knobs used in 737 and other commercial airliners. The white stripe on the knob is actually transparent and lets light pass through. so we can see the knob position at night, without lights turned on in the cockpit.

I found a person on eBay selling a bunch of Boeing parts for home simulator rigs.

This is the e-bay seller I bought it from:

https://www.ebay.com/usr/carichristianson0809

And this is the model of the knob:

Korry Knob Boeing BP247-A1G2
 
Here is my Plan for Serial 140088 with help from SteinAir:Screenshot 2023-12-10 at 18.49.20.png
I am probably going to put the 507 on the center console however above the angled dash 7 fuel valve.
 
It’s very common, but what is the reason for the ignition breakers adjacent to the switches? Is it just to shorten wire runs?
It's common with P-Mags because you want to interrupt the power to each one to test the internal generator along with grounding the P-leads during the run-up.
 
Here is my Plan for Serial 140088 with help from SteinAir:View attachment 56899
I am probably going to put the 507 on the center console however above the angled dash 7 fuel valve.
MIg,
Just a couple thoughts - and, it may save you a few bucks (but check with Stein):
*The G5 may be unnecessary as I believe with two G3X's offer plenty of redundancy. I believe the G5 is generally installed in the config above (in conjunction with a G3x) so it can take over should the G3X display fail. The G5 can also take over 'directing' the Auto-Pilot. That said, I believe since you have a second G3x - the second G3X can be effectively configured as the back-up, in place of the G5. I would at least ask Stein about this. Maybe in your scenario, the G5 is essentially third in line? What I would rather have (I do have) in my plane is a different level of redundancy (vs the G5 batting third) - I'd opt for an iPad with a stratus with ADHRS. This way, you could lose the whole panel, but you'd still be able to navigate and follow an approach if necessary using foreflight and the stratus. The ipad (or even your iphone) will hold a charge for at least an hour to two, and the stratus will go for 8-12 hours. You would lose AP, but again, this set-up is the third batter - not your primary backup. If you remove the G5 - it gives you a nice place to put your iphone (ram mount). And, if you go to the small (7") G3x, you could mount an iPad on the rightside. This puts them both in convenient places where they are easy to see and use (put a usb outlet behind each so they can charge in flight).
BTW - I've had multiple panels (RV7 and RV14's) built by Jason at Aerotronics. He knows this stuff inside and out.
 
Another new RV-14 IFR AdvancedPanel. AF-5600 EFIS PFD-MFD, Avidyne IFD440, PS Engineering PDA360 Remote Audio Panel and Dynon Com Radio.

Van's just finished upgrading their original RV-14A to a Dynon HDX AdvancedPanel with our ACM-ECB. Van's factory RV-14A, RV-14, RV-7, RV-7A and RV-9A all have AdvancedPanels with our ACM-ECB.

Our plug-and-play AdvancedPanels are surprisingly affordable. We'd love to quote one for you.

49863643842_c8a9735c9c_b.jpg


Rob Hickman
N402RH RV-10
Advanced Flight Systems / Dynon Avionics
I absolutely love this panel! My only modification was to add two seat heater switches in the upper right corner.
 
Below is post I made a couple days ago on the DeltaHawk thread on the RV14 page. Thought I would post it here as well since it is panel specific and may be of use for folks working on RV14 panels in general (not necessarily DeltaHawk specific panels)….

Post:
Here is the panel we will be using in the DeltaHawk RV14. There's a lot to unpack here, so look at the schematic and the panel rendering first and then the comments below should mostly make sense. Hopefully, I did this correctly and the pics have enough resolution - I was able to zoom in on features after posting.

DH RV14 Panel A.1a.JPG


DH RV14 a.2.png





Back Ground: The panel for the DeltaHawk project was originally built about two years ago by Aerotronics (Jason Smith’s outfit in Billings, Mt). He's done countless panels for Synergy Air in Eugene for RV builders - and, is almost exclusively used by the RV14 builders there. The panel was originally intended to be in my 'next' RV14 - which fortuitously became the test plane for DeltaHawk. The original design was a new iteration of the panel in my current RV14, with some minor modifications to allow a co-pilot to have more access/control over the avionics. The biggest change vs the old panel was the addition of a 7” G3X on the co-pilot side. Now, with the introduction of the DeltaHawk engine to the mix, there are a few more alterations.

Features - In General:

Sharp eyes may notice the additional real estate on the DeltaHawk panel vs a stock RV14 panel. It comes from two (2) sub-panels - to the left and right of the throttle area. Both lightly recessed (towards the firewall about an inch). This idea came from an RV7 built around 2000 by Mitchell Lock – long before he joined Van's and became their CEO (I purchased this RV from Mitch in 2003 and accumulated about 1000 hours on it before selling). I never found the lower panels to hamper clearance for my legs (I’m just shy of 6' tall), and the added real estate opened layout options for the upper panels. On the DeltaHawk panel most of the switches are located on the lower panels. There are also some circuit breakers - but most of the circuitry is routed through the VP-X electronic circuit breaker system (it didn’t have the capacity for all of the circuits in this panel).

The Panel is set up to allow two (2) pilots to share tasks, although it will function for a solo pilot just fine.

Avionics:

Full IFR Garmin Set-up:

GTN 750i

G3X (10” and 7")

Remote Audio panel, Remote Transponder, Remote Comm2 - all accessible thru the G3Xs (IMO the G3X interface is superior to the head mount for these items, and it frees up significant space on the panel for the TVs).

Auto-Pilot

Connexts - for bluetooth streaming

Additionally, the DH panel has two layers of redundancy. First, dual G3Xs allow for reversionary mode should one unit fail (much like having a G5). Secondly, there is accommodation for a Stratus/Sentry and iPad(s) running Foreflight. Should the whole panel go dark (unlikely, but one never knows) - one could navigate or manually shoot an emergency approach using the ADHRS generated from the Stratus/Sentry and displayed on the iPad. The iPad and the Stratus/Sentry have dedicated USB charging ports, but also have internal batteries so they will continue to operate for quite some time in the event of a power loss.

Specifics on the various sections of the panel:

Lower Panels:

No Mixture Control Knob
. The DeltaHawk engine doesn't use one. It has only Throttle and Prop Controls.

Switches: Laid out generally in order of use (left to right). I will only cover the ones that may need some 'splainin'.

“EFIS” switch: Located to the far left since, with the Garmin, its good to power up the G3X asap, as all the engine gauges are displayed via its MFD. One would want this up and running before engine start and it takes about 30 seconds to power up.

Start" switch: Replaces the Keyed Ignition one sees in most Lycoming installations. Hold the switch 'down' to heat up the glow plug, then hold the switch 'up' to start the engine.

“Idle Gov” switch: This is particular to the DeltaHawk engine as compression ignition engines are difficult to control at idle. The Idle Governor works in conjunction with the fuel control unit. The idle governor, when turned on, will ensure the engine never operates below 1200 rpm. This needs to be on a pilot operated switch to shutdown the engine. (*simplified* shutdown procedures are to turn off idle gov and bring power lever to idle).

Fuel Pump” switch: This is located on the right sub-panel, a bit out of the way – as its function is primarily as a back-up to the engine's two (2) mechanically driven fuel pumps. The delivery fuel pump sends fuel from tanks at about ~50 psi to the high-pressure fuel pump. The high-pressure fuel pump sends the fuel at very high pressures to each injector. The electrical pump is a backup for the delivery fuel pump and is an FAA part 33 requirement. DH is still developing the fuel system procedures; typically, the boost pump is activated during start-up, then turned “off” at taxi commencement, and then remains in the 'off' state. The G3X is configured to indicate low fuel pressure. If this were to happen the boost pump should be turned “On”.

Emergency Engine Stop Control (pull cable): Required to allow for two (2) methods of shutdown. Typical shutdown is completed by switching “off” the Idle Gov and bringing the power lever to “idle”. Since this is a compression ignition engine, the secondary method of shutdown is to pull the Emergency Engine Stop. This cable will close off induction air, quickly shutting down the engine.

Left Upper Panel
:

iPhone: The schematic doesn’t show the details well, but we have an iPhone Max (on an articulating mount) to the left of the G3X. Again, personal preference. Having put the iPhone in about every conceivable place in the RV7 and the RV14, this seems to be one of the best options for readability and accessibility. A USB outlet is adjacent to the mount for charging the phone flight. Personally, I tend to use the full-sized iPad (on the right side of the panel) for navigation and other stuff, but its also handy to have the iPhone to access checklists (foreflight), checking weather along a route, and managing playlists (bluetoothed through the panel).

Cabin Heat: Heat is NOT supplied via a heat muff on the exhaust, instead it taps into heat from the coolant hoses. The heat system is located aft of the firewall (other than the coolant lines that supply hot coolant to the heat exchanger) and sits against the firewall above the exhaust tunnel.

The Cabin heat control cable controls the flow of coolant through the firewall. With it pulled, coolant will flow through the cabin heat exchanger (wouldn’t want a 200F heat exchanger sitting in the cabin on a hot day). There are air diverters/ducting to direct the heat towards pilot/copilot feets.

The control knob controls the speed of the fan to recirculate the air through the heat exchanger. This system eliminates the risk of CO and the need for the cabin heat doors.

Warning Lights: Probably all are self-explanatory except the "Idle Gov". This is to warn the pilot the Idle Gov is not engaged (once the engine warms up, it should be engaged for the entire flight). Idle Gov light will illuminate if the Idle Governor is not receiving power.



Center Upper Panel:

Overall, this area doesn't need much commentary. While the Comm2, Transponder, and Audio panel are all remote mounted (accessed thru the G3X), our preference is to have the actual panel head for the Auto-Pilot. Personally, I use the AP in probably 80% of my flying. Even when not in IMC, the AP is being used to hold altitude, climb/descend, steer with the heading knob, or follow a route in a flight plan. Hand-flying the plane is great, but on many flights its very enjoyable to set the AP, listen to some great music, and enjoy the amazing scenery! Having the AP head below the GTN works nicely as it enables easy back-and-forth with the Throttle/Mixture controls.

Right Upper Panel:

Mostly self-explanatory again. The dark matter on the right represents a full-sized iPad. It doesn't show that well on the schematic – especially in that with the mount we use, the iPad can be positioned in almost limitless orientations. I currently have this set-up in my RV14. It uses a MyGoFlight articulating mount - the iPad can be flat against the panel, rotated, tilted, or even extended over towards the pilot (useful when flying solo and one doesn’t want to strain to see/reach the iPad). A USB plug for in-flight charging is located next to the mount (behind the iPad). Also, behind the iPad is a glove box.

Astute observers who have not fallen asleep from my long-windedness, will note there are leading edge light controls above the 7" G3X and may wonder why these are necessary when the lighting switches on the lower left panel seem to cover all the bases. It’s for more lighting - especially when landing on a grass strip in the middle of Nowhere Mountains. The Aveo Zip tips are nice, but they lack a bit of forward lighting for this type of venue. So, we're wired up for an off-road set-up, but have yet to decide on which brand of lights use. Looking for something like "Elk Spotters 1000". We’ll be visiting all the light guys at Air Venture this year.

Few Random things:

Inogen Oxygen System
. We will likely be using Windblade's Inogen O2 concentrator. I use this in my current 14 and love it. It’s to be ‘hard-wired’ and the unit will sit just below the throttle area (Van's has a slanted panel some folks use for circuit breakers down there – we’ve converted it to hold the Inogen Unit). No tanks to fill (!!!) - it literally concentrates O2 from air in the cabin and delivers it via a cannula to your nose. Its approved for use up to18'K msl (there are asterisks - talk to Tom at Windblade for info).

Control Sticks: We are using Tolsten. Been very happy with them in the past. Functions: PTT, CWS (control wheel steering), AP disconnect, Freq Swap, Flaps. Can’t recall, but I think we may have allowed for the leading-edge lights to be controlled by one of the little hidden buttons below the PTT switch.

Headsets: The plane is equipped to use both Lemo and traditional jacks for the headsets.

Last edited: Yesterday at 8:14 PM
 
Hi all,
I thought I might share my progress on the RV-14 panel. I have fabricated some backlit "sub-panels" and I am very excited with the results! It's all homemade, using laser engraver paint, acrylic, and flexible LED strings.


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These photos are all broken but I’d love to see your backlit panels!
 

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Another new RV-14 IFR AdvancedPanel. AF-5600 EFIS PFD-MFD, Avidyne IFD440, PS Engineering PDA360 Remote Audio Panel and Dynon Com Radio.

Van's just finished upgrading their original RV-14A to a Dynon HDX AdvancedPanel with our ACM-ECB. Van's factory RV-14A, RV-14, RV-7, RV-7A and RV-9A all have AdvancedPanels with our ACM-ECB.

Our plug-and-play AdvancedPanels are surprisingly affordable. We'd love to quote one for you.

49863643842_c8a9735c9c_b.jpg


Rob Hickman
N402RH RV-10
Advanced Flight Systems / Dynon Avionics
Gorgeous!! I Love this panel. (plus, it's mine)
 
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