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  #11  
Old 12-11-2020, 07:51 PM
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MacCool MacCool is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironflight View Post
In the bad old days, in a Minnesota winter with a J-3 on skis, we’d drain the oil at night, and heat it on the stove the next morning before pouring it in to the engine.

I dont think I’d go to that extreme, but a sump heater sure works wonders if you want to have warm oil and a warm sump before flying in the cold....
In those old days, I lived in Northern Minnesota (now live in Central Minnesota...gonna keep moving south until I get warm). A sump heater, and especially a cylinder band heater, and especially a sump heater AND a cylinder band heater on a cell-remote switch is a much more elegant solution than I could ever have dreamed of back then.
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  #12  
Old 12-11-2020, 08:04 PM
BillL BillL is offline
 
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Location: Central IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lr172 View Post
You'll get lots of opinions on this. Most say oil must be 100* <snip>
I care only about cyl barrel temp (to avoid scuffing from piston expanding faster than the barrel), which I can't measure. I wait until my CHT's are 250* and wait one minute more for the barrels to catch up. <snip>
I always use a sump heater below 35* and use 20W50. I would probably have a minimum oil temp of 60-70 if I used straight wt oil.

Larry
100F for me is to avoid that red flashing light for over pressure oil on the panel on takeoff, nothing else. And from an engine standpoint that probably is the only thing that would cause any failure if extreme. Pressurized oil to the journals is just to cool the bearings as oil heats with shear, so that is not an issue.

I would agree with the 60-70F for start, I did the same at the same temps for my Phase I.


BTW the piston/wall clearances are made for running very hot, on a hot day and flying into a heavy rain and shrinking the barrels without seizing the pistons. This has happened. This is one reason there is more piston rattle on the aircraft engines. I know for a fact, it (the rattle) is why the skirts are thicker than normally would be needed. This is one thing I noticed about all the piston/barrel clearances when I first arrived in engineering at Continental. Don't worry about take off and piston being too large.
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  #13  
Old 12-11-2020, 11:20 PM
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jcarne jcarne is offline
 
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Thanks for all the great replies guys! Looks like I need to invest in some sort of pre-heat. I will come up with a home brew cowl heater for the time being and get something more permanent in the not too distant future. Thanks!
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  #14  
Old 12-12-2020, 06:02 AM
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rleffler rleffler is offline
 
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I have Reiff bands and pads on the cylinders, sump, and oil cooler. If I turn them on before going to bed, the oil is a toasty 90-100 degrees when I arrive in the morning.

I used to use a switch control box, but when I upgraded to a 4g unit, it went bad, and I couldn’t get any support to resolve the issue.

I now use a smart plug and a Verizon MiFi in the hangar. That also gives me Internet access not only to the smart plug, but other devices I use in the hangar.

Since the airport doesn’t have any cell towers nearby, I also installed a cell repeater with a remote antenna on mounted on the roof of the hanger with earth magnets. The airport doesn’t allow drilling holes or mounting anything to the hangar. So the plate the antenna is mounted to and all the cable restraints are mounted using magnets.

This solved the issue of getting good cell signals in the hangar when the door is closed and the heater is one.
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  #15  
Old 12-12-2020, 08:53 AM
lr172 lr172 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillL View Post

BTW the piston/wall clearances are made for running very hot, on a hot day and flying into a heavy rain and shrinking the barrels without seizing the pistons. This has happened. This is one reason there is more piston rattle on the aircraft engines. I know for a fact, it (the rattle) is why the skirts are thicker than normally would be needed. This is one thing I noticed about all the piston/barrel clearances when I first arrived in engineering at Continental. Don't worry about take off and piston being too large.
Thanks Bill. Good to know. So, the scuffing we often see on the walls is more likely from either carbon debris or simply the excess clearance allowing more skirt edge contact?

I'll have to look at where my high oil pressure alarm is set at. I often take off with oil temps in the 70-80* range and have never noticed excessively high OP readings with 20W50. Though I imagine a bunch of tolerance stack up could create differences between individual engines.

Larry
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Last edited by lr172 : 12-12-2020 at 08:56 AM.
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  #16  
Old 12-12-2020, 08:59 AM
lr172 lr172 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcarne View Post
Thanks for all the great replies guys! Looks like I need to invest in some sort of pre-heat. I will come up with a home brew cowl heater for the time being and get something more permanent in the not too distant future. Thanks!
An easy way for the short term is a milk house heater with some simple 5 or 6" thin wall, flexible metal ducting from the hardware store. Shape the ducting to fit in the cowl air exit area.
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  #17  
Old 12-12-2020, 09:08 AM
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MacCool MacCool is offline
 
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I have a Reiff TurboXP....heats the oil to 150 degrees overnight, will go from 20F to 75F in about 3 hours. I turn it on and off with a Switcheon. That’s a cell-connected switch that uses NB-IoT (narrow band - Internet of Things) and cost $200 including the first year of cell connection. No sims, no activation, no contract. Subsequent years are $50. Works even with cell connection too weak to make a phone call. Not an employee, just an enthusiastic customer.
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  #18  
Old 12-12-2020, 09:53 AM
TShort TShort is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lr172 View Post
An easy way for the short term is a milk house heater with some simple 5 or 6" thin wall, flexible metal ducting from the hardware store. Shape the ducting to fit in the cowl air exit area.
This. I've been using one on the C-170 for 10+ years, couple of Harbor Freight moving blankets on the cowling and the entire engine compartment is 80-90 degrees even in midwestern winter.

Cheap and easy. Lots of guys at our airport do this.
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  #19  
Old 12-12-2020, 10:11 AM
PilotjohnS PilotjohnS is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Southwest
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I would look at putting shutters on the oil cooler, even temporarily.

The reason is you have to run the engine at high power settings to finish break in. Even if you take off with warm oil, once you run to high power settings for break in, the oil will cool down and the oil pressure could get really high.

I would think you would want a way to keep the oil warm during high power break in. With an o360 in the rv7 on a cold day, you should be scooting along at a pretty good clip ( a technical term)
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  #20  
Old 12-12-2020, 02:28 PM
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jcarne jcarne is offline
 
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I have an oil shutter with a control in the cockpit so once I'm flying it should be easy to get the temp where I want it. Just need to get it warmed up before starting.

If you see my other thread it looks like I might have plenty more time to get this figured out...

Thanks for the recommendations everyone
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