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  #11  
Old 03-03-2021, 01:12 PM
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pazmanyflyer pazmanyflyer is offline
 
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Location: Litchfield Park, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by salty View Post
This is a good tip. I felt that might work, but I wasn't certain.

Now, a followup question.

What's the purpose of the dashed line running parallel, but very close to the solid line on the right side of the bottom left drawing in figure 3? I get the purpose of the dashes on the flange at the bottom, as they indicate the little kickout, but why do they go all the way up the part?

My guess is just to provide context. It makes it more obvious than if the dashed line where only on the flange, but does it mean something more?
That right end is cut at an angle (beveled) and you're looking at the front view. This front view shows you a solid line being the front edge and the dotted line as being the rear edge of the angle cut.
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Last edited by pazmanyflyer : 03-03-2021 at 01:16 PM.
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  #12  
Old 03-03-2021, 01:16 PM
salty salty is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pazmanyflyer View Post
That right end is cut at angle (beveled) and looking your looking at the front view. You see a solid line being the front edge and the dotted line as being the rear edge of the angle cut.
Holy cow, you're right. I didn't catch that before. It looked to me like it was squared off at the edge of the flange, but now I see the angle goes all the way back. Thanks! Now it makes perfect sense.
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  #13  
Old 03-03-2021, 01:17 PM
salty salty is offline
 
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The irony is I was jumping through crazy hoops to fabricate it without the angle. It'll be a whole lot easier to finish it now. LOL

Great help!
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  #14  
Old 03-03-2021, 02:33 PM
Ralph Inkster Ralph Inkster is offline
 
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Wait till you get to wiring schematics
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  #15  
Old 03-03-2021, 03:06 PM
salty salty is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph Inkster View Post
Wait till you get to wiring schematics
That won’t be a problem. I have lots of experience there.
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  #16  
Old 03-03-2021, 04:20 PM
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chrispratt chrispratt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tjo View Post
The easy way is if the flange was facing away from you, it would be hidden from view by the back of the part. As a hidden line it would be dashed. if the flange was coming out toward you it would be a visible line, and therefore would be solid. In this case it is a solid line, so it is coming out at you.

Tim
Correct. I learned this the hard way. When I built my -8 I had never seen a blueprint before. The first piece I made from supplied stock was the bracket that holds the throttle, mixture, prop cables near the console on the left side of the fuselage. I was so proud. It was beautiful and looked exactly like the part in the drawing except that it didn't fit. That's when the lightbulb went off in my head -- oh, maybe that's what that dashed line means. The flange goes on the other side. If it's a dashed line, it means that part of the piece is on the other side from what you're viewing.

Homebuilding is educational after all.

Chris
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  #17  
Old 03-03-2021, 04:41 PM
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As others have said, Vans uses the US drawing convention called 3rd angle projection.
It is not used worldwide. It is common to see 1st angle projection on European documents.
They read 100% mirror image from the above discussion. Watch out for this.

Rant mode on...

A proper title block will tell you in text and with a small model of a truncated cone (easy to visualize view directionality) what projection type is being used.

I blame the degradation of 2D documentation on two things. One, folks dont have time. Just get er done. I am guilty of this. Plus there have never been standards at my current employer.

I think more insidious is the unintended consequences of the advent of 3D modelling. The draftsman thinks he is done once the 3D model is complete because he can throw it over the wall to somebody else for manufacture. All the data is there if you want to dig for it. The automated systems to generate 2D drawings work fine, but they only pay attention to the part itself. The extra stuff that used to be very useful standards are a fading art.

The drawing in question from the OP is from a 3D model. The isometrics are true and correct. You can see the off angle flange if you carefully compare the left and right iso views.

Rant off.
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Last edited by rzbill : 03-04-2021 at 10:45 AM.
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  #18  
Old 03-03-2021, 05:27 PM
tjo tjo is offline
 
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Location: La Center,wa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by salty View Post
This is a good tip. I felt that might work, but I wasn't certain.

Now, a followup question.

What's the purpose of the dashed line running parallel, but very close to the solid line on the right side of the bottom left drawing in figure 3? I get the purpose of the dashes on the flange at the bottom, as they indicate the little kickout, but why do they go all the way up the part?

My guess is just to provide context. It makes it more obvious than if the dashed line where only on the flange, but does it mean something more?
the right edge of the part is tapered. Therefore the front edge is visible, but the back edge is hidden and slightly narrower than the front, so it is a dashed (hidden) line going all the way top to bottom.

Tim
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  #19  
Old 03-03-2021, 07:27 PM
alumley alumley is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Ontario
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Quote:
Originally Posted by salty View Post
And another, slightly different example of my confusion. In this particular case it doesn't really matter because the cuts are symmetrical.

However, it's still interesting to me because my wife held the part up one way and I held it up the other and we both said it matched, and after I looked at it closer, I realized we were both right. Nothing on the diagram indicates if the bend is towards or away from you.
I had the same issue with the rudder stiffeners. I was certain I had labeled them right but when I went to assemble them it was clear I had it backwards, luckily it doesn't matter for these parts because no matter how you see the drawing you'll end up with one of each length!
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  #20  
Old 03-03-2021, 08:09 PM
Yen Yen is offline
 
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The views are Plan, which is from above looking down,
Front elevation, which is looking horizontally at the broad face, and Side elevation, also horizontally, but at 90 deg to the front elevation. The isometric view is just to make it clear
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