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Service Documents released on 1/23/2023

greghughespdx

Well Known Member
Advertiser
RV-12/12iS Service Bulletins/Letters released 1/23/2023

The following service documents for the RV-12/12iS were released today.

NOTE: If you need to order SB or SL parts for multiple RV-12/12iS aircraft (unusual), it is important that you place one web store order per serial number. We will not ship multiples of these kits/parts for a single serial number. If you place multiple orders to cover multiple aircraft, specify the serial number for each order and we will work to combine the orders if they are shipping to the same person (assuming they are ordered in close proximity to each other of course). The SL and SB kits and part numbers described in each document are available to search and find on our web store. If one of the kits/parts shows "back ordered," it's just because the kit bundles are not yet updated in our system. You can go ahead and order today. Also, various sections in the RV-12/12iS kit assembly instructions (plans) were updated to coincide with these service doc releases and in some cases are called out in the SB docs to be referred to while complying with the service info. Those are uploaded and available on our website in the Service Information and Revisions section.

SB-00059 - RV-12iS Canopy Latch Block Improvement
Multiple reports from the field have shown that the canopy latch handle can be forced past the canopy latch block. Once past the block, it becomes impossible or very difficult to open the canopy without disassembling the handle from the outside or using destructive methods to force the latch back over the latch block. For this reason, a new canopy latch block has been designed to add a feature that prevents the canopy latch from being moved past the edge of the block. This is a fairly simple replacement of the canopy latch block with the new version, which can be completed in the aircraft cockpit. This part is now shipping in kits.

SB-00064 - RV-12/12iS Exhaust Flast Spring Installation
Addition of flat spring parts to the #1 exhaust tubes to address potential for slip joint separation and/or contact with engine cowl. This is a fairly simple operation that requires the removal of the engine cowl and camping on of the springs to the #1 exhaust tube. Thes parts are now shipping in powerplant kits.

SB-00067 - Reinforcement of the WD-1223 Counterbalance Arm
Data from the field suggests that the WD-1223 Counterbalance arm is subject to fatigue failure, which could result in the mass balance weights separating from the stabilator. Complying with this service bulletin will prevent the fatigue failures. There are a couple of methods of accessing the counterbalance arm, and the amount of time needed will vary by the method chosen. Note that if you remove the stabilator you may want to also install the optional SL-00068 spacer kits, described below. These parts are now shipping in kits (see the bulletin for details).

SL-00068 - Optional Stabilator Hinge Spacer Installation
Permanent optional shims are available to replace washer spacers and reduce the difficulty of installing/removing the RV-12/12iS stabilator. Installation of this shim kit will simplify and make less frustrating future removal and reinstallation of the stabilator. A one-time project, long-term simplification. Optional, and now included in shipping kits.

SL-00070 - Optional Fuel Tank Inspection Fitting
Describes the optional addition of a fitting to the top of the original model RV-12 tank to allow for easier inspection of the fuel strainer.​
 
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Hi Greg,

It looks like parts are not available or already out of stock for SL-00068, and SB-00067 as they appear on back-order in the sttore. Any rough idea on lead- times for these components?

Cheers,
Paul
 
Hi Greg,

It looks like parts are not available or already out of stock for SL-00068, and SB-00067 as they appear on back-order in the sttore. Any rough idea on lead- times for these components?

Cheers,
Paul

Greg said:

If it shows Backordered, it's because the kit inventories are not yet updated - you can go ahead and order today.
 
Is SB-00059 also applicable to legacy RV-12s with N 17-12-08 (canopy latch upgrade using C-01205-2) installed?
 
Is SB-00059 also applicable to legacy RV-12s with N 17-12-08 (canopy latch upgrade using C-01205-2) installed?

It's not specified as such in the SB. EDITED: However, the part can be applied to a legacy RV-12 with the C-01205-2 block installed. We will release a revised SB soon to cover that. ELSA owners can do so now if they wish, and SLSA owners should be sure the SB specifies their airplane to remain compliant (hence the need for the revision).

Thanks much.
 
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Is this forum the new “official” way to get SB notifications? I used to get them via email until mid-last year.
 
Is this forum the new “official” way to get SB notifications? I used to get them via email until mid-last year.

We still send emails to those owners with aircraft that apply to a given SB or SL. We post them to the Service Information area of our website first (and that is the "Official" location for notifications, BTW), and email notifications are sent after. If you're not getting notifications that you think you should via email, please drop me an email (greg at vans aircraft dot com) with your email address and serial number. I can take a look.
 
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Greg, I see the KAIs associated with these SBs have been posted. It doesn’t appear the changes for SB-00067 - Reinforcement of the WD-1223 Counterbalance Arm, have been incorporated into section 11. Is this an omission, or is there a reason this modification isn’t required for new builds, or am I missing something?
 

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i read earlier in this thread that the counterbalance can be removed from inside the tailcone. is this the complete assembly or just the counterweights?
 
The SB-00067 instructions refer to the 11iS KAI’s for balancing the stabilator. I have a Classic 12 which had no requirement to balance the stabilator. Would someone mind posting the relevant page from the iS plans? Also can the stabilator be balanced on the plane if the stab is not removed for the upgrade?
 
Also can the stabilator be balanced on the plane if the stab is not removed for the upgrade?

I believe it’s possible, if you don’t mind a few trips in and out of the tail cone. You’ll most likely have to remove mass from the counter weight, which will require removing them from the arm. If you didn’t remove enough, you’ll be going in and out again, and repeating if still not enough was removed. Then you’ll likely be adding a few washers from inside the tail cone to fine tune the balance. No doubt this process would give you the best balance since the AST arm and servo would be in the system exactly as intended vs. a bench simulation. If you performed SB-00053, you’ll have a good understanding of the effort to accomplish from inside the tail cone.
 
Thanks for the plans Tim. There must be a lot of 12's flying whose builders weren't aware of this more recent requirement. I wonder how critical it is. Maybe Greg could comment?

Bob - thanks. Yes, I've made that trip a few times. This job won't be much fun either way.
 
I wonder how critical it is.

The first sentence of the first note indicates it’s an optional process. You’ve apparently flown for some time now without having done it, so you’d be in a good position to evaluate how much effort you’ve had to make to manually hold trim. I balanced mine before my first flight so have no frame of reference.
 
It may be more of an issue in the rare event of a cable breaking when you may be relying on trim to control the plane. I'm guessing a more balanced stabilator may make this easier. I've never had a problem with the trim, but like you I don't have another frame of reference either.

Edit: As you say, the plans make balancing an option so it can’t be that critical. For those who did balance how much length did you have to take off the weights?
 
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I must be misunderstanding the time allotment to accomplish this. It indicates that 1.5 hours is required to disconnect all cables, remove the stabilator, install the parts and rebalance, reinstall the stabilator, reconnect the cables and set the tensions. Was the time a misprint?

Jerre
 
I must be misunderstanding the time allotment to accomplish this. It indicates that 1.5 hours is required to disconnect all cables, remove the stabilator, install the parts and rebalance, reinstall the stabilator, reconnect the cables and set the tensions. Was the time a misprint?

Jerre
I suspect they only count the time actually spent doing the work, not the time required to gain access or put it back together. I'm about 38 hours into a "16 hour" fix that's maybe 65% done for another SB.
 
SB-00067 Counterbalance arm reinforcement

The wording of this SB seems to leave me in conflict with the KAI.

I have an RV-12 classic that has recently flown for the first time. It is unpainted, doesn’t has the optional stabilator tips and no weight has been removed from the four lead weights per the instructions at that time.

Since this was built the updated plans (11iS/U-02, step 8) now call for pre-trimming the two outboard lead weights and optional balancing after painting (11iS/U-11).

SB-00067 in step calls for balancing after installing the straps.

Not having painted yet, the wording of the SB leaves me conflict in the KAI.

I assuming that I should increase the length of the pre-trimming of the two lead weights to account for the weight of the straps that are being added and delay the balancing until after painting.

Greg: Is this the correct interpretation?

Thanks.

Brett
Columbus, IN N4BH
 
"On Backorder" not what it seems

I ordered the SB59, SL64, SB67, and SL68 kits on 24 Jan with least expensive shipping. The next day I ordered the same kits for a building buddy who is out of the country but almost done with the aircraft. He wanted expedited shipping. It shipped the same day. I was told by Nancy the parts were on hand just waiting to be kitted up. Impressive. (Still haven't received my shipping notice, but the shipping to Utah was only about $8 for expedited). All parts cost $59 plus sales tax and shipping.
 
Has anyone else received their counterweight repair parts?

I ordered SB-00067 and SL-00068 on 1/23, as of 2/1 my order status is “pending”.
 
I also ordered on the 23rd, but chose least cost. It was delivered USPS on the 28th or 30th, I forget which.

If yours is still pending, you might want to reach out. Might be a payment issue.
 
SB-00067 Counterbalance arm reinforcement, balancing requirement

Regarding my previous post asking about the balance requirement called out in this SB, this is what I learned after contacting Van’s Builder Support.

This SB overrides the KIA. Thus, the stabilator is to be balanced prior to flight and after any modification (paint, etc.).

So, as I understand the history of balancing the stabilator. The legacy RV-12 didn’t call for any trimming of the lead counterweights. The RV-12iS called for a preliminary trim of 3/4” off the end of two of the weights and an optional balance after painting. Now balancing is required for all models independent of paint.

Obviously rebalancing after paint will require adding weight (washers, etc.).

Out of curiosity, does anyone have any idea how much weight would need to be added to account for the addition of paint ?

Thanks.

Brett
Columbus, IN N4BH
 
I would like to know what the downside of not balancing is as the majority of the fleet have probably not lightened the weights.
 
Regarding my previous post asking about the balance requirement called out in this SB, this is what I learned after contacting Van’s Builder Support.

This SB overrides the KIA. Thus, the stabilator is to be balanced prior to flight and after any modification (paint, etc.).

So, as I understand the history of balancing the stabilator. The legacy RV-12 didn’t call for any trimming of the lead counterweights. The RV-12iS called for a preliminary trim of 3/4” off the end of two of the weights and an optional balance after painting. Now balancing is required for all models independent of paint.

Obviously rebalancing after paint will require adding weight (washers, etc.).

Out of curiosity, does anyone have any idea how much weight would need to be added to account for the addition of paint ?

Thanks.

Brett
Columbus, IN N4BH

Is doing a rebalance via access through the tailcone practical, or does the requirement for a rebalance mean, in practical terms, the whole SB-00067 will need to be done by removing the Stabilator?
 
Is doing a rebalance via access through the tailcone practical, or does the requirement for a rebalance mean, in practical terms, the whole SB-00067 will need to be done by removing the Stabilator?

I can’t imagine laying on my stomach in the confined space at the back of the tail cone, removing the weights, crawling out to cut the weights down, crawling back in, reattaching them hoping enough was removed, potentially having to crawl back out to remove more weight, trying to drill the steel counterbalance arm, installing the Cherrymax rivets, then fine tuning the weight by adding washers. Just doesn’t sound practical, and not possible for me at least to accomplish.
 
What am I missing? Since my plane is flying and has been fine for the past 1100 hours. My plan is to weigh the SB parts and remove an equal amount of counter balance weight. If I can’t remove it at the same distance from the hinge then calculate the equal weight at the arm length that is removable.
 
My Cherokee has an access plate on the right side of the fuselage to access the counterbalance arm. After licensing my RV-12 I added one. It has come in very handy since installing it in 2012. I also added 5 on the belly.
 
SB-00067 Stabilator Mass Balance Reinforcement

In the RV-12iS instructions page 11iS/U-11, a one step process for determining how much weight is to be removed to achieve a balanced stabilator assembly is described.

Namely, after disconnecting the control cables and the trim/servo pushrod were to place the test weights on the stabilator. Then, half of the sum of test weights needed to balance the stabilator is to be removed from the two outboard counterbalance weights. This factor of one half accounts for the difference in length of the moment arms. Further, it says that 0.1 inch removed from a counterweight is approximately 0.032 pounds.

The procedure also cautions that it better to have too much counterbalance than not enough.

Assuming that one has a legacy RV-12 without the stabilator tips, just the pre trimming of 0.75 inches on the two outboard weights would result in a removal of 0.48 pounds. So, I would assume the accounting for the straps being added and any additional required weight removal would result in more than 0.5 pounds being removed. If so, step 6 of the SB states that the Weight and Balance needs to be recalculated. Unfortunately, the moment arm needed for this calculation isn’t given in the SB.

The SB states that the changes are being made to address a fatigue failure. What I’m still not understanding is how going from the preliminary trim of the balance weights before paint and optional balance after paint to requiring balancing before and after painting helps address the fatigue failure.

Brett
Columbus, IN N4BH
 
Does anyone see a problem with drilling holes in the lead weight plates versus trimming them to compensate for the weight of the straps. My quick calculation says it would take 2 to 3, 3/8 in diameter holes through all four plates to compensate.
 
Don't over thnk this

The SB does not override the Instructions for Continued Airworthiness. It only covers what you do once to comply with the SB.

If Vans really intended to have the re-balance occur more often than once when the SB was performed they needed to update the Maintenance manual or specify in the SB the conditions under which the re-balance should occur.

The aircraft design (which Vans claimed meets the ASTM standards) only needs an approximate balance - as evidenced by the KIA process of adjusting the weights based on the installation of the wing tips without measuring the actual balance.

I would assume that balancing will improve something (handling in turbulence is my guess) but they did not require it - Hence it is not needed to meet the ASTM standards.

I can think of 2 reasons for them to require the balance in the SB-one is that they wanted to remind those who had a balanced tail to re-balance and forgot to handle the case of folks that had not balanced it. The other is that they did not want to invest whatever engineering/flight test money that would be required to evaluate the change without a re-balance; they know that if we balance the surface, the flying qualities will be acceptable.

In any case - do the SB, including the balance, then go back to following the Maintenance manual for annuals/maintenance procedures (assuming you do not wish to use the "experimental" nature of the aircraft and ignore Vans instructions altogether.)

Note that the weight of the aircraft is not going to change much at all if you were in balance to start with - you will remove just a little less mass from the balance than you added because what you added was closer to the pivot by a couple of inches. The only way I can see the W&B changing is if you started out significantly out of balance.
 
The added weight from the SB was 2.0 oz to my counterbalance. I upsized the unused existing hole and drilled into the lead on both sides to remove 2.0 oz of lead. Seems to be fine.
 
I built my 12 and got my AW cErtificate in 2012. Never had a balance step in my KAI. I had the plane painted after Phase 1 and no balancing. Seems to fly just fine.
 
I suspect they only count the time actually spent doing the work, not the time required to gain access or put it back together. I'm about 38 hours into a "16 hour" fix that's maybe 65% done for another SB.

This confirms my suspicion that I'm the slowest builder on the forums. I'm sure I'll spend more than 1.5 hours re-attaching and tensioning the cables.

Jerre
 
I don’t know, Jerre.. When you throw in my cussing and discussing every change that comes out, I bet you run circles around me!🤣
 
I recently did mine, a 2010 model. I found that removing the stab was the best way to go. I removed aprrox 3/4" from the outboard weights 7.8oz for a perfect balance. At this time I used quick set epoxy to set the 4 thin shim washers in place. I did the whole procedure solo using adjustable stands but it would've been nice to have help. I would say it's about a 6 hour job, I'm slow and methodical but I'll be doing a friends soon and it should go a bit faster. During the flight test I noticed no change hand flying but my autopilot held altitude much better instead of the usual porposing of 10-20' which seems to tighten up after a few minutes of warm up. I don't like crawling in the tail unless there is no other choice.
 
i did the washer epoxy thing in the original build. still holding. if you are going to do that i would go to as slow set up epoxy as i could. i think that is one reason jb weld holds so good. it takes several hours to set up. definitely slows things down but maybe you don't do it so often.
 
Does anyone see a problem with drilling holes in the lead weight plates versus trimming them to compensate for the weight of the straps. My quick calculation says it would take 2 to 3, 3/8 in diameter holes through all four plates to compensate.

I'm planning on drilling through the forward unused hole in the weights to adjust after painting the aircraft. That way if I ever need to add weight for some reason, I can just install a bolt back through that hole.
 
I have done two aircraft so far, mine and a friends. Cutting off 3/4" from the outboard weights with a hacksaw resulted in 7.8-7.85 oz removal and a perfect balance.
 
We performed the counterweight reinforcement service bulletin this past Friday on a legacy RV 12, and were able to get to the two bolts holding the counterweight rod off and on without removing the stabilator, sliding the counterweight out through the empennage. Not pretty, but we were satisfied with the outcome. Again, cutting off 3/4” off of the two outer lead plates gave a perfect balance (this one was never balanced prior).
 
I also performed reinforcement update as well as shim kit to replace washers, I also ended up removing 3/4” from outside weights to attain correct balance, I will tell you that installing spacer kit was a P.I.T.A. . I found that you need to chamfer forward edge of shims more radically than what is shown in instructions.I also put spacer stack in default location even though original washers were 3 thin and 1 thick washer, kit does not supply correct spacers for my original setup , it worked fine after putting an almost knife edge on the front of shims.
Also listen to others advice if removing stabilator PUT TAPE ON FUSELAGE!. It is all back together now, next project is upgrade to voltage regulator with B&C kit even though Ducati has 170 trouble free hours.
Stan
 
I thought I’d post a few pictures of my job.
Stan
 

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