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  #11  
Old 06-04-2021, 04:54 PM
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emsvitil emsvitil is offline
 
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I'm surprised that they didn't mention

Know the layout of your airport.


Although not all airports have multiple runways, it may be easier to land on a parallel or crosswind runway (or even taxiway)..........
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  #12  
Old 06-04-2021, 04:58 PM
Kyle Boatright Kyle Boatright is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emsvitil View Post
I'm surprised that they didn't mention

Know the layout of your airport.


Although not all airports have multiple runways, it may be easier to land on a parallel or crosswind runway (or even taxiway)..........
In that situation, the big win is making a survivable arrival - probably on something flat without big obstacles. There are lots of areas on most airports that qualify. Making it back to the actual runway is the cherry on top.

And if you're gonna practice this, get a feel for it at a safe altitude before you even consider doing it at low altitude.
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  #13  
Old 06-04-2021, 05:11 PM
swjohnsey swjohnsey is offline
 
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Altitude loss is not the whole story. A tight turns gets you back to the runway with less distance traveled.
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  #14  
Old 06-04-2021, 06:00 PM
BillL BillL is offline
 
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This is certainly not the best reporting of the turn back. But they were probably limited by print space or reading time. It is not just about altitude and skill.

EAA Webinar is the best analysis/presentation on this subject I have seen and it was based on fundamentals - the real variables. Highly recommended!!!

I was taught to unload the wing for allowing a 180 with less lateral distance/descent and avoidance of stall.

Pulling back my CS prop will greatly help. YMMV
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Last edited by BillL : 06-04-2021 at 06:06 PM.
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  #15  
Old 06-04-2021, 07:07 PM
Desert Rat Desert Rat is offline
 
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I've done this quite bit in Cessna products on BFR's or whatever, Hopefully it goes without saying that for training I pick an entry altitude that allows for a stall recovery if it's botched.

On a 172, the least altitude loss is consistently achieved while holding best glide and a bank angle that has the stall horn going off, but yeah, It's possible to get one turned around with just a few hundred feet of altitude loss.

Probably not something I'm going to recommend somebody tries in a real engine out when they're close to the ground and freaked out anyway, unless they have absolutely no other options. A stall, or God forbid, an uncoordinated stall leading to a spin entry would almost surely be fatal.
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  #16  
Old 06-04-2021, 08:27 PM
Norman CYYJ Norman CYYJ is offline
 
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The trouble with engine failures they always catch you by surprise and they very seldom happen at a convenient time or place. But training is best it shortens the time you say aw sh**t to the time you get things under control.
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  #17  
Old 06-04-2021, 08:46 PM
David Z David Z is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle Boatright View Post
In that situation, the big win is making a survivable arrival - probably on something flat without big obstacles. There are lots of areas on most airports that qualify. Making it back to the actual runway is the cherry on top.

And if you're gonna practice this, get a feel for it at a safe altitude before you even consider doing it at low altitude.
There's also lots of talk about how great RVs are on short runways. Long runways provide more option to land straight ahead, or to make it back to some part of the airfield. The thing about long runways is they are usually at big airports. Big airports have better crash/fire/rescue. I'd rather crash on a "field" (soft mucky grass between taxiways) with a fire truck 90 seconds away than nose over in a corn field with the fire truck 15 minutes away. Then again, don't crash trying to make it back to the airfield and ignore a perfect empty parking lot. Awareness of surroundings is the important part.
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  #18  
Old 06-05-2021, 07:09 AM
RV74ME RV74ME is offline
 
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Thinking out loud here, but wouldnt it be better to practice with prop lever full fwd (worst case scenario), since thats where it will go if engine loses oil pressure?
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  #19  
Old 06-05-2021, 07:37 AM
swjohnsey swjohnsey is offline
 
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Maybe. If the engine fails it will likely be still producing oil pressure (turning). I going to try it high rpm and see how much difference it makes.
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  #20  
Old 06-05-2021, 07:43 AM
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Mel Mel is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swjohnsey View Post
Maybe. If the engine fails it will likely be still producing oil pressure (turning). I going to try it high rpm and see how much difference it makes.
ABCs Wide World of Flying did a video on "extending the glide" several years ago.

Using a C-182 the difference in glide between course pitch and a stopped prop was a somewhat amazing 26%.

Of course the demonstration was at altitude where you would have time to evaluate circumstances. This might not necessarily apply on initial climb-out situation.
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