VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

-POSTING RULES
-Advertise in here!
- Today's Posts | Insert Pics

Keep VAF Going
Donate methods

Point your
camera app here
to donate fast.


Go Back   VAF Forums > Avionics / Interiors / Fiberglass > Electrical Systems
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #21  
Old 08-09-2020, 11:25 AM
lr172 lr172 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Schaumburg, IL
Posts: 5,951
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lenny Iszak View Post
Todd,

Yes, it's normal. Your efis is likely fed through the ebus diode, which creates a voltage drop. Once you turn on your ebus switch it sees bus voltage.

You can improve the voltage drop by using a Schottky diode on the ebus.

Lenny
Voltage drop from a typical diode is .3 - .4 volts (.1 - .2 on a shotkey). A full one volt drop points to something different. Also need to confirm where the diodes are before making this assumption.

Larry
__________________
N64LR - RV-6A / IO-320, Flying as of 8/2015
N11LR - RV-10, Flying as of 12/2019

Last edited by lr172 : 08-09-2020 at 11:28 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 08-09-2020, 11:46 AM
Lenny Iszak's Avatar
Lenny Iszak Lenny Iszak is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Palm City, FL
Posts: 350
Default

Larry,

That's under no load. Once you start applying some load it voltage drop increases to .4V+ on a Schottky. It can go up to 1.1V on a rectifier bridge.

See Figure 1. for the IXYS Schottky diode, and Figure 3 for the bridge rectifier.

The Schottky is used by Perihelion, and a similar bridge was recommended by Bob Nuckolls.


Lenny
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ixys2.gif
Views:	94
Size:	102.3 KB
ID:	1011  Click image for larger version

Name:	rectifier.gif
Views:	93
Size:	186.2 KB
ID:	1012  
__________________
Lenny Iszak
Palm City, FL
2014 RV-10, N311LZ - 650 hrs
OnSpeed development team
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 08-09-2020, 12:06 PM
TimO TimO is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 640
Default

It's been answered once above, but I'll answer it again.

The ACS regulator part is indeed the same as original, modified with a wire for the OV protection and comes with brushes. It's a good idea to keep one on hand for a spare. I used my spare the last time I had a failure, which was caused by a worn bearing that broke one of the brushes.

The current B&C offerings use a very similar regulator module, but it also is hacked internally to jumper a couple of terminals together to basically just bypass the whole module. The module is only there because it acts as the connector and has the proper terminals to distribute the connections to the alternator in the necessary spots.

While I would recommend a Plane-Power user keep a modified OEM regulator/brush Assy on hand, I think with a little work it would be easy to figure out which off the shelf part would work in a pinch, if you were willing to give up OV protection to get you home when AOG for a bad regulator.

One other note: Alternator shops are familiar enough with these types of alternators that if you can find one willing to help you, they can rebuild them completely, other than that regulator hack. So if you find yourself stuck, see if you can find a shop that will help.
__________________
Tim Olson - CFI
RV-10 N104CD - Flying 2/2006 - 1400+ hours http://www.MyRV10.com
RV-14 N14YT - Flying 6/2016 - 350+ hours http://www.MyRV14.com
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 08-09-2020, 12:10 PM
az_gila's Avatar
az_gila az_gila is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: 57AZ - NW Tucson area
Posts: 10,011
Question

Why not just add OV protection externally like your regulator?
__________________
Gil Alexander
EAA Technical Counselor, Airframe Mechanic
Half completed RV-10 QB purchased
RV-6A N61GX - finally flying
Grumman Tiger N12GA - flying
La Cholla Airpark (57AZ) Tucson AZ
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 08-09-2020, 01:03 PM
TimO TimO is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 640
Default

True, that would be an option as well.
__________________
Tim Olson - CFI
RV-10 N104CD - Flying 2/2006 - 1400+ hours http://www.MyRV10.com
RV-14 N14YT - Flying 6/2016 - 350+ hours http://www.MyRV14.com
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 08-09-2020, 01:57 PM
scsmith scsmith is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Ashland, OR
Posts: 2,810
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lenny Iszak View Post
The regulator sold by Spruce is the same thing as the original. It's also a Hartzell part number. I replaced mine with one from Spruce. Looks exactly the same with the wire included. They give you the whole assembly with brushes and everything.

Lenny
Sorry for my lack of familiarity with how an alternator is assembled, but this should be an easy question:
Is the replacement of the regulator/brush assembly something that can fairly easily be done in the field? Could it be done on the airplane without removing the alternator from the airplane? (this would depend on whether the cover is held on with screws that are only accessible from the side that is against the engine, or by screws that go in from the back and nothing else on the engine is in the way (as if that EVER happens))
Does the back cover come off the housing to access the regulator/brush module, so if you can get the cover off, you can easily replace the regulator/brush module?
__________________
Steve Smith
Aeronautical Engineer
RV-8 N825RV
IO-360 A1A
WW 200RV
"The Magic Carpet" Flying since Sept. 2009
Hobbs 635
LS6-15/18W sailplane SOLD
bought my old LS6-A back!!
VAF donation Dec 2020
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 08-09-2020, 10:16 PM
TimO TimO is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 640
Default

Steve,
I am not sure if you could replace them without removing the alternator or not. I would think that with all the right tools, maybe. That said, I think that since you'd already have the bottom cowl off, all there would be to do is pull the large bolt and the adjuster arm bolt and you'd have the alternator off. That would give you a much better look at what the internals look like, and it would probably take less time, in the end. But yes, the regulator and brush assembly is just under the back cover, so it's not hard to get to.
__________________
Tim Olson - CFI
RV-10 N104CD - Flying 2/2006 - 1400+ hours http://www.MyRV10.com
RV-14 N14YT - Flying 6/2016 - 350+ hours http://www.MyRV14.com
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 08-10-2020, 10:47 AM
Lenny Iszak's Avatar
Lenny Iszak Lenny Iszak is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Palm City, FL
Posts: 350
Default

Steve,

The back cover is held on by 3 screws all pointing aft. On the RV-10 there's plenty of room to remove it, not sure about the 4 cylinder engines.
Replacing the regulator/brush assembly is doable but you'll need a mirror or a phone camera to see what you are doing, especially if you haven't seen the internals of the alternator before.

Tim has a bunch of photos on his site, referenced a few posts above.

Lenny

Quote:
Originally Posted by scsmith View Post
Sorry for my lack of familiarity with how an alternator is assembled, but this should be an easy question:
Is the replacement of the regulator/brush assembly something that can fairly easily be done in the field? Could it be done on the airplane without removing the alternator from the airplane? (this would depend on whether the cover is held on with screws that are only accessible from the side that is against the engine, or by screws that go in from the back and nothing else on the engine is in the way (as if that EVER happens))
Does the back cover come off the housing to access the regulator/brush module, so if you can get the cover off, you can easily replace the regulator/brush module?
__________________
Lenny Iszak
Palm City, FL
2014 RV-10, N311LZ - 650 hrs
OnSpeed development team
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 08-12-2020, 03:57 PM
dpansier's Avatar
dpansier dpansier is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Green Bay, WI (GRB)
Posts: 514
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lenny Iszak View Post
The regulator sold by Spruce is the same thing as the original. It's also a Hartzell part number. I replaced mine with one from Spruce. Looks exactly the same with the wire included. They give you the whole assembly with brushes and everything.

Lenny
Photos of Hartzell P/N 11-1043 Plane Power Regulator, Aircraft Spruce P/N 07-17968 $80.75
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2737.jpg
Views:	98
Size:	169.2 KB
ID:	1195  Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2740.jpg
Views:	114
Size:	161.9 KB
ID:	1196  Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2739.jpg
Views:	112
Size:	188.3 KB
ID:	1197  
__________________
Don Pansier
Green Bay, WI (GRB)
RV-7 N450DP
W9LYX

Antennas for Experimental Aircraft
www.deltapopaviation.com
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 08-13-2020, 07:16 AM
DanH's Avatar
DanH DanH is online now
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: 08A
Posts: 9,934
Default

I suspect the YR6621 is merely a YR662 Toyota regulator clone with an added jumper wire. Apparently it is common worldwide, from a bunch of different sources.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/PREMIUM-NEW...-/221848016822
__________________
Dan Horton
RV-8 SS
Barrett IO-390
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:20 PM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.