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  #21  
Old 04-29-2020, 08:50 AM
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Mel Mel is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Dallas area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobnoffs View Post
which one was the Gomer?
You beat me to it, Bob. I was thinking the same thing!
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  #22  
Old 04-29-2020, 09:46 AM
dwranda dwranda is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Jamestown,NY
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I was watching a youtube flying video and someone commented that this sludge buildup on the oil filler neck was definitely not right. Is this what happens with the condensation inside the engine? I'm new to aircraft engines and trying to learn what to look for. This was on a Beech 6 cyl by the way. Sorry for the crappy pic.
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  #23  
Old 04-29-2020, 06:13 PM
BillL BillL is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Central IL
Posts: 6,320
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yen View Post
I would think you are having some serious moisture problem if the oil is white and foaming. I have never seen that in a normally operated engine, but I do live in a fairly dry climate.
Sorry, but a dry climate has nothing to do with it. The engine combustion produced a high water content. And combined with sulfur in the fuel condenses through out the engine crankcase.

I am now working on a purge phase using a mattress inflator. Calculations confirmed with data indicate 3 min will yield ambient moisture content in the crankcase. A 3-5 liter/min flow through a desiccant will replace the ambient moisture with very dry air in 30 min, but for safety 60 min is recommended. Doing this does not require recirculation. A quart of desiccant should not need regeneration for months, and is not contaminated by oil.

To the OP - yes that helps and should be done, but a purge with mattress inflator, or vacuum cleaner for 3 min will complete the process.
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  #24  
Old 04-29-2020, 06:50 PM
Robb Robb is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Nevada City Ca
Posts: 260
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The only time I have ever seen moisture in the filler neck is when the oil temperature was very low on a flight before I added an oil shutter. Seems to me if the oil temp is hot enough and the flight is sufficient to burn off any moisture it would not be visible? I am in northern Ca and we dont get the severe cold in the winter
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  #25  
Old 04-30-2020, 07:00 AM
pa38112 pa38112 is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Clarksboro, NJ
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Originally Posted by BCP Boys View Post
I'm not picking at you but don't you do at least a quick pre-flight before the next flight?
Yes, but that is not my concern. I do not want the dipstick sitting open all of the time. Would you poor a quart of oil into your engine that sat in your hanger with no cap on it for a year?
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  #26  
Old 04-30-2020, 07:52 AM
Canadian_JOY Canadian_JOY is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillL View Post
Sorry, but a dry climate has nothing to do with it. The engine combustion produced a high water content. And combined with sulfur in the fuel condenses through out the engine crankcase.

I am now working on a purge phase using a mattress inflator. Calculations confirmed with data indicate 3 min will yield ambient moisture content in the crankcase. A 3-5 liter/min flow through a desiccant will replace the ambient moisture with very dry air in 30 min, but for safety 60 min is recommended. Doing this does not require recirculation. A quart of desiccant should not need regeneration for months, and is not contaminated by oil.

To the OP - yes that helps and should be done, but a purge with mattress inflator, or vacuum cleaner for 3 min will complete the process.
Bill - please do share details of this device when you have had a chance to run it. I'd like to do something similar - plug it in after flight with the device on a timer that shuts it off after the engine is purged.
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  #27  
Old 04-30-2020, 08:11 AM
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Location: Fort Mill, South Carolina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jliltd View Post
I can tell you from a personal friend's experience that a 4-cylinder Lycoming will operate fairly fine with the dipstick missing. This friend added oil and was interrupted by a Gomer and forgot to re-install the dipstick. He went on a hour flight with an angle-valve IO-360 and had the same oil level as he filled to (5qts) when he discovered the dipstick back in the hangar. I wouldn't have believed it but I saw it with my own eyes. Just sayin'....
My friend did this just the other day, with negligible oil loss and only a little oil streaking from the oil filler door after landing. My friend thinks most of the "splashing/leaking" happened after landing, when his taildragger taxiied in.
My friend will now devise a dipstick clip to the door so he won't put the dipstick in the forward baggage compartment again.
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Last edited by AAflyer : 04-30-2020 at 08:26 AM.
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  #28  
Old 04-30-2020, 08:58 AM
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Plummit Plummit is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AAflyer View Post
My friend will now devise a dipstick clip to the door so he won't put the dipstick in the forward baggage compartment again.
The answer is even easier than that; when you remove the dip stick, just wipe it off with a rag or paper towel, then lay it on the wing walk where you have to see it when you get in the airplane! If you get in the airplane with the oil dip stick on the wing walk we'll change your name to "Indiana Jones!"

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  #29  
Old 04-30-2020, 09:33 AM
pa38112 pa38112 is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Clarksboro, NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwranda View Post
I was watching a youtube flying video and someone commented that this sludge buildup on the oil filler neck was definitely not right. Is this what happens with the condensation inside the engine? I'm new to aircraft engines and trying to learn what to look for. This was on a Beech 6 cyl by the way. Sorry for the crappy pic.
It depends on the oil you use. The white sludge you see in your photo is what I use to see when I ran Exxon Elite. I would find some on the dip-stick and sum under the valve covers. That oil was formulated to do this in the presence of moisture.
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  #30  
Old 04-30-2020, 10:51 AM
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dpansier dpansier is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Green Bay, WI (GRB)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillL View Post
Sorry, but a dry climate has nothing to do with it. The engine combustion produced a high water content. And combined with sulfur in the fuel condenses through out the engine crankcase.

I am now working on a purge phase using a mattress inflator. Calculations confirmed with data indicate 3 min will yield ambient moisture content in the crankcase. A 3-5 liter/min flow through a desiccant will replace the ambient moisture with very dry air in 30 min, but for safety 60 min is recommended. Doing this does not require recirculation. A quart of desiccant should not need regeneration for months, and is not contaminated by oil.

To the OP - yes that helps and should be done, but a purge with mattress inflator, or vacuum cleaner for 3 min will complete the process.
Thanks for the data Bill, based on your description, I'm invisioning your doing the following.
Are you using a 120 volt blower?
I have used Duck Bill valves in the past and they may work well in this application as check valves.

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