VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

-POSTING RULES
-Advertise in here!
- Today's Posts | Insert Pics

Keep VAF Going
Donate methods

Point your
camera app here
to donate fast.

  #21  
Old 03-08-2016, 11:48 PM
rightrudder rightrudder is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Laguna Hills, CA
Posts: 1,853
Default

Hey whd721,

I'm betting the white cowls are thicker near the firewall than the Pepto version, so you're getting no pucker, or minimal amounts.

I flew twice today, each flight a whopping 0.5 on the Hobbs. It was still quite breezy after the storm, so I did an exploratory flight up to the base of the Cajon Pass. I was getting knocked around some from gusts, so being the turbulence wimp that I am, I turned back to the airport. I had 120 lb. of cement in the right seat as ballast, and the extra weight really helps the sink rate on approach. But working at cross purposes was an idle adjustment I made earlier that bumped idle speed to about 800 rpm, from 650. Too much! I put it back down to 650 and while it sputters and gasps at this speed, it continues to run, and as I found out on the next flight, reduces the float over the runway.

I was looking on this flight to find a ballpark power setting to maintain pattern altitude (with full flaps), and what works for me is thus: About 1700 rpm to fly the pattern at about 70-72 knots; pull back to about 1300 rpm abeam the numbers and trim for 65 knots; then back to 1000 rpm trimmed for 60 knots on final, sometimes pulling all the power out/pitching down slightly as needed to get the desired descent. You have to be really patient and set up early with the -9; I found it far easier to hit my aiming spot on the runway in my transition-training -7A that had a more natural-feeling, linear sink rate...but also the sense that the bottom would drop out if you got carelessly low with your airspeed!

And man, 60 knots seems like slow motion when you've been bipping along at 140 or so!!

My second flight was amazing: I took off just as the sun set, the pattern to myself. Flew east toward San Bernardino, made a crisp 45-degree-bank to double back toward the airport, with runway now lit up. The air was calm, the 210 freeway was ablaze with taillights and the pattern was again empty. It was just dark enough to see my landing light on the pavement. Life is good.

I also met some fellow RV-ers on the field...Joel and his wife Kim, who flew in from their Santa Barbara work assignment to have some graphics applied to their red/white RV-7A by Cable's resident nose art-ist, Victory Girl, aka Jerri (sp?). Super nice folks, all. I hope Joel posts some pics of his -7A with the new graphics. It looks fantastic.

Looks like tomorrow will be calmer, so I hope to add more ballast, fly to the high desert and bore some full-throttle holes in the sky.
__________________
Doug
RV-9A "slider"--sold in July 2021
Flew to Osh in 2017, 2018 & 2019!
Donation made for 2021
You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky -- Amelia Earhart

Last edited by rightrudder : 03-08-2016 at 11:54 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 03-09-2016, 01:11 AM
IowaRV9Dreamer's Avatar
IowaRV9Dreamer IowaRV9Dreamer is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Marion IA
Posts: 1,116
Default

Man Doug, please o please keep posting these reports. That made me want to run out to the hangar and get working on my 9A! Thanks so much!

The speeds seem so slow, and do I understand that you fly the downwind with full flaps? I've heard the 9s are hard to slow down. Sure a lot different than my Beech.

Thanks again!
__________________
Dave Gribble VAF #232
Building RV-9A N149DG (slider, IO-320, IFR)
Restored and Flying Beech Super III N3698Q
Marion IA

Struggling with fiberglass

There is no sport equal to that which aviators enjoy while being carried through the air on great white wings." Wilbur Wright, 1905
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 03-09-2016, 10:06 AM
rightrudder rightrudder is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Laguna Hills, CA
Posts: 1,853
Default

Hey Dave,

Yes, keep working! Eventually, a glorious, fully functioning plane will emerge...I'm living proof!

At this point, yes, I'm flying the whole pattern with full flaps and keeping the speed down. It just helps to reduce the workload, to get the aircraft stabilized at 70-75 KIAS maybe a mile or so out (and slowed down somewhat at 4-5 miles out). The key thing is to do some stalls at altitude on maybe your second flight to see what YOUR airspeed indicator reads. For me, a power-of stall with flaps extended was 39 KIAS at solo weight, which gave me full confidence to slow it down to 60 on final. Controls do get quite light at 60....and the difference in feel from, say, 80 to 60 is noticeably more pronounced in a -9A than in a Cessna 172 or Piper Cherokee, for instance. So do those stalls and lots of slow flight at altitude early on, and build that confidence.

Maybe later when I have more experience, I can approach the pattern with a little more speed and slow it down mid-pattern, but for now I'm very content to trudge along!

In a 172 or Cherokee, they're draggy enough that when you reduce power approaching the pattern, you're almost automatically in Vfe range, so a quick glance at the ASI and you can start feeding them in. in the -9 or -7, you've just got to be more deliberate, stay ahead of the plane, and go back and forth with power reduction and nose-up trim to bleed off the speed and maintain altitude. No biggie, just a little more planning involved.

One more observation that's old news to RV gurus but new to me: There's so very little adverse yaw with the ailerons that I hardly use the rudder at all when at altitude to keep the ball centered. P-factor on takeoff requires higher rudder control effort than my rental planes, but less throw because of the RV rudder's generous size. I've yet to deal with any significant crosswind, but in coming weeks I'll do some crosswind landings on purpose up in the high desert.
__________________
Doug
RV-9A "slider"--sold in July 2021
Flew to Osh in 2017, 2018 & 2019!
Donation made for 2021
You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky -- Amelia Earhart

Last edited by rightrudder : 03-09-2016 at 10:14 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 03-09-2016, 08:21 PM
rightrudder rightrudder is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Laguna Hills, CA
Posts: 1,853
Default

A 2.2-hour flight this morning got me to 16.4 on the Hobbs. The most notable thing was that most of the flight was at 2600 rpm or above for engine break-in. No problem at all with temps on a full throttle sustained climb, from about 2500 ft to 7500 ft, at roughly 600 fpm with a KIAS of about 120. Next time I'll trim for 110 knots and see what that translates to in climb rate (and see what the temps do).

Red cube not calibrated yet, but based on what it took to fill the tanks afterward, fuel consumption worked out to 8.0 gph on this flight. It was hard to discern any oil consumption at all on the dipstick...maybe a cup at most?...so I feel good about the break-in thus far. I'll keep the cylinder pressures up as much as possible for the duration of Phase 1.

Going back and forth across the practice area (8500' westbound, 7500' eastbound), I was working on maintaining a precise altitude with trim and the very slight stick pressure these RVs are famous for. I'm trying for that 5/95 ratio of quickly checking the instruments, then getting eyes outside for the all-important scan for traffic. It's pretty lonely in the high desert at those altitudes, but you never know. Ever mistake a bug splat on the canopy for traffic, just for an instant? [Sheepishly raises hand] I hate that!

It just so happened that Joel and Kim, unbeknownst to me, were at the airport when I made my sunset flight. I noticed some shadowy figures near the taxiway taking pictures, but it was only later that I learned it was them. Thanks for the pic!!

__________________
Doug
RV-9A "slider"--sold in July 2021
Flew to Osh in 2017, 2018 & 2019!
Donation made for 2021
You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky -- Amelia Earhart

Last edited by rightrudder : 03-09-2016 at 08:41 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 03-10-2016, 08:20 AM
Planecrazy232's Avatar
Planecrazy232 Planecrazy232 is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Cape Coral, FL
Posts: 435
Default

Congrats on working through your Phase 1. I just finished mine and it's great to be able to actually go somewhere.

Not to be a debbie downer, but my Phase 1 limitations said "day VFR only". You may want to check yours to make sure you are in compliance.
__________________
Thanks,

Anthony

RV6-A "Aluminum Mistress"
Too many hobbies- not enough time.
2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 donor and happy to do it.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 03-10-2016, 08:59 AM
Rupester Rupester is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Mahomet, Illinois
Posts: 2,195
Default

Way to go, Doug. Your control discoveries and observations make me smile .... you perfectly described flying the Nine. Until you get used to the slippery airframe, slowing down for the pattern always reminded me of Sky King and "throw out the sandbags, Penny!"
You'll find the Nine is marvelously tolerant of X-winds .... w-a-y more so than any certificated aircraft I've flown. (And especially 172s). Keep up the good work and have a ball!
__________________
Terry Ruprecht
RV-9A Tip-up; IO-320 D2A
S. James cowl/plenum
(Dues paid thru Nov '18)
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 03-10-2016, 09:35 AM
Mel's Avatar
Mel Mel is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Dallas area
Posts: 11,214
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Planecrazy232 View Post
Congrats on working through your Phase 1. I just finished mine and it's great to be able to actually go somewhere.

Not to be a debbie downer, but my Phase 1 limitations said "day VFR only". You may want to check yours to make sure you are in compliance.
Yep, "day VFR only" is standard on all op lims for phase I. If not, they were issued improperly.
__________________
Mel Asberry, DAR since the last century. Over 1,000 certifications accomplished. Discount for Veterans, Law Enforcement, Fire Fighters.
EAA Flight Advisor/Tech Counselor, Friend of the RV-1
Recipient of Tony Bingelis Award and Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award
USAF Vet, High School E-LSA Project Mentor.
RV-6 Flying since 1993 (sold)
<rvmel(at)icloud.com>
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 03-10-2016, 09:41 AM
TFeeney TFeeney is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Floyds Knobs, IN
Posts: 175
Default

That picture looks like it has a REALLY long taxiway.
And I'm sure there was some after landing checklist items that he did immediately after landing.

That's at least 45 mins to an hour before this picture was taken. Appears to be day VFR to me.
__________________
RV10
QB Wings done
Fuselage done
Systems and electrical...
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 03-10-2016, 10:35 AM
airguy's Avatar
airguy airguy is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Garden City, Tx
Posts: 5,589
Default

It can be very difficult to accurately judge lighting with some many camera variables...
__________________
Greg Niehues - SEL, IFR, Repairman Cert.
Garden City, TX VAF 2021 dues paid
N16GN flying 900 hrs and counting; IO360, SDS, WWRV200, Dynon HDX, IFD440, G5
Built an off-plan RV9A with too much fuel and too much HP. Should drop dead any minute now.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 03-10-2016, 01:29 PM
rightrudder rightrudder is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Laguna Hills, CA
Posts: 1,853
Default

Hi guys,

I think I was OK per day VFR as my landing was only about 25 minutes past sunset. It may look a little darker in the picture, but I could've easily landed without the runway lights.

Here's another shot my friends took of me on that flight. I'm right on the horizon, where the base of the mountain and the flatlands intersect.



Rupester, love the Sky Kings reference!! You're so right about crosswinds. So far I've only dealt with an X-wind component of maybe 8 knots and I don't even remember doing anything other than a little aileron input to keep 'er on the centerline. Landings in this thing are an absolute joy... the nose-high flare is very intuitive, and the way it floats at solo weight, you get to enjoy that 5-foot-AGL feeling for a while! I'm getting a lot better at carrying the nose wheel after touchdown of the mains; you have to get it to full back stick pretty quickly. If I'm not fast enough, the nose will do one gentle pogo, but full back will arrest the tendency.

Anthony, yes, I'm dreaming of flying to all possible destinations! But first, to the paint shop....

TFeeney, yes, a long taxiway. Our runway is 3706' excluding thresholds, and I like to roll to near the end to save the brakes a little. Winds usually favor 24, so you're landing downhill, and from the numbers to the VASI, there's an additional downward dip, which adds to the complication (the entire runway is a gentle sine wave in profile). And you fly the pattern in a fisheye cutout of Ontario's Class C, so a bit of a tighter pattern is encouraged so as to not bust airspace, so there's just enough time to level the wings briefly on base before turning final. And I'm essentially doing mountain flying to reach my practice area. And I'd rarely gone to nontowered fields in my previous flying experience. So the learning curve has been steep, but very rewarding!

I'm still a little fast over the fence on landings...maybe 65 KIAS, and I need to bring it down to 60. More storms on the way, so the next flight will probably be next Wed. or Thur.
__________________
Doug
RV-9A "slider"--sold in July 2021
Flew to Osh in 2017, 2018 & 2019!
Donation made for 2021
You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky -- Amelia Earhart

Last edited by rightrudder : 03-10-2016 at 02:16 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:54 PM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.