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  #1  
Old 11-13-2019, 08:15 PM
Radioflyer Radioflyer is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 197
Default Do all RV's fly about the same?

I have heard it said that if you learn to fly one RV, you can fly any RV. Obviously a tail wheel aircraft will be different from a nose gear type, but is there some truth to this? For example, if you train on a -9A, are you ready to fly a -6A as well?
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  #2  
Old 11-13-2019, 08:36 PM
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RWoodard RWoodard is offline
 
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Location: Brighton, Colorado
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All the multi-place planes fly the same...

The THREE stands alone in a whole better world!

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  #3  
Old 11-13-2019, 08:41 PM
Whitman Whitman is offline
 
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I?ve flown mostly in my -4, but I?ve also sampled the 6,7,8,9. There is a very noticeable difference in the roll rate of the Rv4 vs everything else. The pitch is similar as well as the general light handling, but there?s no beating the rv-4 for handling....except for the rv3 apparently!
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  #4  
Old 11-13-2019, 09:10 PM
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Ed_Wischmeyer Ed_Wischmeyer is offline
 
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Location: Savannah, GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radioflyer View Post
I have heard it said that if you learn to fly one RV, you can fly any RV. Obviously a tail wheel aircraft will be different from a nose gear type, but is there some truth to this? For example, if you train on a -9A, are you ready to fly a -6A as well?
Not really --
* The short wing two seaters can have a high sink rate, power off, much more than the -9/A;
* The higher wing loading of the -10 gives it a different feel;
* The tandem seaters have a different sight picture from the side by sides;
* Power and choice of prop can give different planes different feels.

As it turns out, I checked myself out in all of the RVs I've owned. Then again, I'd had a lot of experience in many kinds of airplanes including gliders before my first RV flight. I did get two landings while accompanied by the previous owner of the -9A, but the other three were tandems. The -8A was a piece of cake, the -8 was challenging because it had a tailwheel steering malfunction.

Learning to fly in one RV will in fact help you with any other RV, but it won't make you comfortable. And differences in instrument panels, systems, and power can slow down the transfer from one RV to another of the "same" kind.
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  #5  
Old 11-13-2019, 09:11 PM
Discus2b Discus2b is offline
 
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They seem so much alike. 9a owners will know best. More information is needed on differences between actual aircrafts to give you the best answer. The flying part won?t be a big deal, the systems differences could require a checkout.
Engine, prop, fuel management, aircraft op. limitations. Etc.
Checkouts in different aircraft with competent others familiar is best and allows you to relax, learn, enjoy, and makes for a fun flight. First time in any different aircraft is always a hoot and better with another pilot, but not in a 3.

R
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  #6  
Old 11-13-2019, 11:25 PM
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Ironflight Ironflight is offline
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Writing as one who has flown every model of RV (except the -5, and that might happen), I’d say that no, they don't all fly alike...but yes, they are all honest airplanes that aren’t out to get you. If you can fly one model, you have the capability to fly them all - but a good checkout in your first few is a great idea.

Taildraggers fly like taildraggers, nose-draggers fly like nose-draggers (just keep the weight off that nose gear!).

The differences you’ll notice are mostly in response rate for given control deflections, and the control forces themselves. Mike Seager has proven that if you can check out in a side by side two-seater, you can easily step in a tandem without a problem.

With good fundamentals, all RV’s are in reach.

Oh...the -1 was the least responsive of the line, but then...it was where Van did his learning. Thankfully, he got everything right on his very next next one, the -3!

Paul
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  #7  
Old 11-14-2019, 02:49 AM
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Dan 57 Dan 57 is offline
 
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as to how they fly is one thing... another factor is visibility.

Taildraggers are not only landed differently, but close to leaving or approaching mother Planet the outside view is different; Moving for instance from a -3/-4/-8 to say a -6/-7/-14 one might be surprised at the lack of, or very restricted, runway view during the initial take-off and and the flare for landing phases of the flight.
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  #8  
Old 11-14-2019, 07:33 AM
YellowJacket RV9 YellowJacket RV9 is offline
 
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I did transition training in a 6A to prep for my 9A. The only change I needed to make in flying the 9A was to subtract 10 knots from the approach speeds, because the 6A does sink much more. Speed is important, since the -9 will float a lot more on landing with any excess speed, so we prepped for that with no flap landings in the 6A. In the air, I found flying qualities to be very similar. Yes, the roll rate may be different but unless you are really flinging it around, it isn't very noticeable in everyday flight, in my opinion.

Chris
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  #9  
Old 11-14-2019, 10:25 AM
Radioflyer Radioflyer is offline
 
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Verrry interesting. So, the answer is yes and no. Training in one model can prepare you for being PIC in another model provided 1) landing gear type is same and 2) quick checkout still advised. Rates and forces are different but not day/night different. Panel layout and systems may be bigger factor transitioning among models than actual flight characteristics. The slow-speed, high sink rate of the side x side (except for the -9) seems to be a characteristic most pilots mention.

Last edited by Radioflyer : 11-14-2019 at 10:27 AM. Reason: I meant sidexside, not tandem
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  #10  
Old 11-14-2019, 10:54 AM
lr172 lr172 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radioflyer View Post
Verrry interesting. So, the answer is yes and no. Training in one model can prepare you for being PIC in another model provided 1) landing gear type is same and 2) quick checkout still advised. Rates and forces are different but not day/night different. Panel layout and systems may be bigger factor transitioning among models than actual flight characteristics. The slow-speed, high sink rate of the side x side (except for the -9) seems to be a characteristic most pilots mention.
I have over 600 hours in the 6A and my insurance carrier still required 5 hours or a check out with CFII for the 10. Regardless of similarity or lack thereof, insurance companies don't seem to think they are in all cases. I didn't really find this objectionable in my case, as the 10 does handle differently than the 6 in the landing phase.

Larry
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