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  #1  
Old 03-21-2019, 09:07 AM
Sam I Am Sam I Am is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Amarillo, TX
Posts: 45
Default O-320 E2D Drama

I purchased my first plane, a 2003 Vans RV-9A, July 2018. I commute from Texas to Kansas weekly for work so have accumulated almost 200 hours since purchase. The plane had 525 TT when I bought it. The Lycoming was a rebuilt that was in storage for some time before the RV builder purchased it in 1999. Previous log books were not available but Lycoming estimated that it had been in use for 2,000 h when he purchased it. The engine was disassembled and reassembled by A&P with new gaskets and seals at time of the builders purchase and pistons, valves, seats, cam, lifters, etc all appeared new based on log book entry. Had a prebuy conducted and no issues were noted at purchase.

Almost immediately fuel burn went to 11 to 12 g/h and the engine would not run smoothly. Two mechanics later there were multiple fuel leaks found. Replaced the Van's fuel selector valve with Andair. Fixing the leaks brought the fuel use back to 7,5 to 8 g/h but the engine was not very smooth. Found the intake connector hose clamps were loose and tightened them up. Through trial and error determined that when the electric fuel pump was turned on, the engine would turn off! Only use electric fuel pump when priming. The primer was checked and not leaking fuel to the cylinders when not activated.

High CHTS climbing out has been a common issue (425F) until fall weather brought cooler ambient temps. The plane is equiped with and EIS 2000 with probes in the 1 and 4 cylinders. Baffling is in good shape and checked again last night with flash light for leaks. Started to notice that the mixture would be set at flight elevation then would get LOP after some time. The engine tried to quit several times at take off then did quit at 11,500 over the panhandle one day. I then replaced the carb with a rebuilt Marvel-Schebler MA-4SPA and a new lycoming mechanical fuel pump. Wow! The engine ran much smoother and fuel burn at 7 g/h. Thought I had it fixed....

Now that the weather is warming up, the CHT are skyrocketing. Yesterday I left TOP (880 msl, 60 degrees F). I taxied to the runway with the engine leaned, conducted my runup to 1,800 rpm after enrichening the mixture. The left mag was rough so ran the engine up and leaned to burn off the plugs. Next mag check spot on. As I lined up to take off, the CHT #4 was already 425 F and #1 was 415F. I took off with one eye on the sky and one on the EIS. I climbed very slowly, full rich, as the temps went to 485. When I reached 3,500 msl, the cylinders started to cool to less than 400 F as I continued to climb to 10,500 (32 degrees F). The temps settled in at 375 and 355 for the remainder of the flight. When I landed in Amarillo, the temps immediately went to 285 for roll to the hangar. This has been the condition for the last 3 flights. The previous flights did not entail having to burn off the plugs before take off.

I'm about to conduct an intake leak test but thinking that my scenerio doesn't quite fit a leak. I've read that the Lycoming SB 258 can be an issue so will pull the carb and check the intake through the sump for dead space. Any other ideas would be much appreciated.

While I have the podium, I would like to thank everyone for their time and knowledge on this forum. I'm a newly minted pilot with a new plane and would have walked away by now had it not been for this forum and peoples honest input. THANK YOU!!!!
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  #2  
Old 03-21-2019, 09:33 AM
JonJay's Avatar
JonJay JonJay is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Battleground
Posts: 4,348
Default

Check your timing?
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  #3  
Old 03-21-2019, 09:55 AM
Sam I Am Sam I Am is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Amarillo, TX
Posts: 45
Default

New spark plugs and timing was checked at annual in July 2018. Slick mags rebuilt in 2016. Good point and will check timing again.
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  #4  
Old 03-21-2019, 10:20 AM
DennisRhodes DennisRhodes is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Taylorsville, Ga
Posts: 885
Default

Check engine baffles for leakage and or good seal. CHT on slow taxi , TO and Climb are effected tremendously by leakage and by pass. Be sure all baffles are turned to correct position after cowl installed. Poor Seals at cowl inlet { to lower section} are bypass killers.
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  #5  
Old 03-21-2019, 12:52 PM
lr172 lr172 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Schaumburg, IL
Posts: 6,710
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam I Am View Post
I took off with one eye on the sky and one on the EIS. I climbed very slowly, full rich, as the temps went to 485.
During this climb, what was the airspeed, RPM, and fuel flow? What prop type are you running? It's possible/likely the main jet on the new carb is too small.

Larry
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Last edited by lr172 : 03-21-2019 at 12:54 PM.
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  #6  
Old 03-21-2019, 12:59 PM
lr172 lr172 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Schaumburg, IL
Posts: 6,710
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam I Am View Post
As I lined up to take off, the CHT #4 was already 425 F and #1 was 415F.
Something doesn't seem right here. I don't understand how a lyc engine running at idle can produce these kinds of CHTs.

Larry
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  #7  
Old 03-21-2019, 01:04 PM
sbalmos's Avatar
sbalmos sbalmos is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Liberty Twp, OH
Posts: 681
Default

Maybe leaks at the intake tube gaskets to the cylinders making everything too lean, regardless of mixture control?

Admittedly I'm watching this thread closely. I've had insanely high CHTs also. But for me that might be a combo of timing maps in the EFII system, using an SJ cowl, and baffles. We'll see this weekend after my 5-month winter overhaul after I switched to a factory cowl and did some timing remapping.
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  #8  
Old 03-21-2019, 01:13 PM
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10builder 10builder is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Nashville, TN
Posts: 147
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lr172 View Post
Something doesn't seem right here. I don't understand how a lyc engine running at idle can produce these kinds of CHTs.

Larry
Sure does sound like the timing is too far advanced.
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  #9  
Old 03-21-2019, 03:19 PM
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Mycool Mycool is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: West Hills, CA
Posts: 424
Default Same same

I have the same setup, but had to break in engine during summer temps in souther California. After break in CHT?s were still HIGH.

Installed ANTISPLAT cowl flap and it instantly solved all problems of cooling. Just recently installed a second cowl flap ( not required ) but just for additional even cooling.

Its easy to install and worth every penny! Antisplat has great customer service and everything I purchased is of high quality,
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  #10  
Old 03-21-2019, 10:07 PM
esco esco is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: SoCal
Posts: 407
Default Take a step back, pls

Sam:

My two cents:
1. Stop flying the airplane.
This will not fix itself. It will get worse, until you resolve underlying issues.
You can choose to fix an unflyable airplane on the ground. In the air you have fewer choices, with worse consequences.

2. Pay for an evaluation by a no-kidding RV expert, to include a thorough inspection, and if safe, a flight to evaluate operations.
Mr. Syracuse comes to my mind.

3. Don't poke holes in the airplane.
Lots of RVs fly, in hot places, without 485F temps on climbout.

R&R doesn't seem to have identified underlying issues. Remove and replace, as you're seeing, is expensive in time, money, and opportunity cost.

The good news:
-you're reading this, I hope, safely on the ground. We're not reading about you.
-this is fixable (with enough information, time, money, and effort.)

Caveats: my perspective is based on reading many Lycoming pubs, operating (1) RV-9A with an 0-320-E2D for a couple of hundred hours, and doing my own maintenance.
I'm no expert!


Good luck, and be safe.
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