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  #1  
Old 01-22-2018, 04:50 PM
Hongie Hongie is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Mackay Australia
Posts: 41
Unhappy Low time Pilot, New (to me) RV, motion sickness

Hi All, long time lurker here, only a couple of posts.

I received my recreational cert. back in 2012 (Australian equiv of a sport pilot i suppose).

Background:
My 1st flight was in a Fly Synthesis Texan, on a hot bumpy day. Another student on the ground before my flight said, "Don't throw up!". We got into the circuit started doing basic effects of controls etc. I'm getting greener. I said to the instructor, "i'm going to spew!" He handed me a towel and I used that. Nothing actually came out of me, just a big burp, was a strange experience. We landed, and I called it quits for the day.

I ended continuing my training, and it took me, according to my logbook, about 19 hours to go solo. I battled air sickness the whole way. I then completed the endorsements I wanted (cross country, radio, passenger etc).
My instructor was(and is) convinced its all in my head. I, to a point, agree. Sometimes I would feel sick before we were even airborn. It was never a case of being nervous about the flying or the landing. I knew I could land it, fly it, navigate etc. I was afraid of being sick.

I kept flying for another year or so in a rented aircraft, which was a ICP Savannah with a very light wing loading, STOL kind of aircraft. Probably not ideal for our climate. Hot, humid, bumpy etc. Then work rosters and things changed, didnt have time to continue flying.

Fast forward to present day. I now have a lofty sum of 60 hours total time.

On the weekend, I pulled the trigger and bought a RV-7a superior io360 cs dynon SV touch etc, nice plane.

Went for a short flight with the owner, and again its the middle of our summer, hot humid and bumpy, After 15 mins, I'm asking to go home. No vomiting, just the sweats and queezy.

I know it has been a considerable amount of time since I've flown, and I'll never be an aerobatic king, but I'm stubborn and have wanted an RV ever since I found a stack of sport aviation magazines in a secondhand shop when I was a kid.

But now I'm thinking I've made a mistake. More then anything, I get angry/disappointed/ashamed about being sick, and disappointed that I cant enjoy what has been my passion since I could talk!

Sorry for the long winded post.

input/opinions appreciated.
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  #2  
Old 01-22-2018, 05:00 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Livermore, CA
Posts: 7,857
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There is a wrist band available that discharges a small current into the nerves under your wrist. ?Relief band? ? Something like that. I know some people that swear by them, for preventing air sickness.
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  #3  
Old 01-22-2018, 05:04 PM
YellowJacket RV9 YellowJacket RV9 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Clearwater, FL KCLW
Posts: 1,330
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Does it happen more when you are NOT the one flying? Being in control and having something to do seems to help a lot. The quicker responsiveness of the RV may have something to do with it as well.

I have a pretty iron stomach, and had 200ish vomit-free hours before finishing my RV -but doing RV transition training on a hot south Florida day, I felt pretty bad on the first flight, where I wasn't doing as much of the flying. After recovering on the ground, I did all the flying on the next flight, and felt much better. Still not 100%, but better each of the next few flights. Now I have 200 hours in the RV with no more issues.

Also, try to fly early in the morning or when it cools off in the evening, when the air is cooler and calmer, at least while you get comfortable. It will get better, I can almost guarantee it. Enjoy your RV!

Chris
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RV-9A - Done(ish) 4/5/16! Flying 4/7/16
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  #4  
Old 01-22-2018, 05:05 PM
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Veetail88 Veetail88 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Hales Corners, WI
Posts: 1,016
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I had exactly the same thing when I started flying again after quite an interruption and then building my 8. The first few flights were horrible with sweating and very queasy stomach. Stubborn I am though, and in time it went away. I can still make myself sick with enough yanking an banking, but for the most part I'm ok.

Try Ginger root. Lots of folks say it works. I think it worked for me, placebo or not!

I have a rule for passengers, I'm very happy to turn over control of the airplane to you, but if you turn me green, times up!

A bit of straight and level with my own hand guiding the ship brings me back from the brink.

Hang in and don't give up.
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  #5  
Old 01-22-2018, 05:06 PM
Jake14 Jake14 is offline
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Seattle
Posts: 389
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Stay with it. Bob Hoover, the greatest pilot of all time, talked about how hard it was for him to overcome the nausea when he first started flying and teaching himself aerobatics. Many sailors will throw up the first few days at sea and then be fine for the duration. I had a hard time with nausea when I first started aerobatic training to the point where I could only do about 3 maneuvers and then had to go home. I'm fine now.

It's mostly in your head, but you have to keep at it and it'll go away
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  #6  
Old 01-22-2018, 05:22 PM
terrykohler terrykohler is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,044
Default I started flight training to see if I could overcome sickness

Brad:
Really bad for me in the beginning as well. Found when I climbed above the bumps into cooler air, the problem went away. Still don't like steep turn and spins- I tend to fly VERY smoothly even today. That was 47 years and thousands of hours ago.
I really enjoy rough time weather sailing, but I turn into a puker if I even stick my head belowdecks. It's an inner ear thing, I guess. I've discovered where the "edges" are for me and haven't been sick for years. Good luck.
Terry, CFI
RV9A N323TP
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  #7  
Old 01-22-2018, 05:22 PM
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KRviator KRviator is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sydney, Aust.
Posts: 849
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hongie View Post
Fast forward to present day. I now have a lofty sum of 60 hours total time.

On the weekend, I pulled the trigger and bought a RV-7a superior io360 cs dynon SV touch etc, nice plane.

Went for a short flight with the owner, and again its the middle of our summer, hot humid and bumpy, After 15 mins, I'm asking to go home. No vomiting, just the sweats and queezy.

I know it has been a considerable amount of time since I've flown, and I'll never be an aerobatic king, but I'm stubborn and have wanted an RV ever since I found a stack of sport aviation magazines in a secondhand shop when I was a kid.

But now I'm thinking I've made a mistake. More then anything, I get angry/disappointed/ashamed about being sick, and disappointed that I cant enjoy what has been my passion since I could talk!

Sorry for the long winded post.

input/opinions appreciated.
Don't feel too bad (and please forgive the terrible pun...). I gave away a career in the back end of a Herc because I got too airsick, but now happily fly my -9 with nary a hint of uneasiness. It does go away, even being bounced around in an Australian summer.

What worked for me usually is being conscious of what I'd eat the morning before flying. Usually just jam on toast, with a glass of water, or similar. No juice, milk or tea. The other consideraion is the type of flying you'll be doing. If going cross=country, go as high as the weather allows. Smoother, more efficient, better glide range and better visibility usually.

Being PIC you'll probably find you have less time to worry about being airsick vs actually flying the plane and thinking about this-and-that.
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  #8  
Old 01-22-2018, 05:22 PM
moosepileit moosepileit is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 748
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As a kid I went up in a bait spotting tower of a boat in swells. Got sick. All day long, rode it out in the boat. That cold KY Fried drumstick that stayed down was my first favorite meal. Nothing since bothered me until my first summer Pitts dual after college.

Flew gliders, including acro by 14. Fast turn rate light loading, quick but low g onset. Not much air sickness seen there teaching in a large club. Acro Dual- saw some airsickness, but mostly poor food choices before ride. About the same proportion as USAF pilot training.

I know at least the USAF aerospace physiology folks will work over a willing student in a "Barany" spin chair system until they acclimate their inner ear. That seems to help get most of the willing over the hump for the heat and bumps and acro.

I'm no medical type, I have no idea what is available in the civilian world aside from enjoying cool, smoother early and late day on one hand. Take dual from someone that can take over as PIC if you don't knock it off soon enough with higher heat, bumps, turn and roll rates, g onsets and durations on the other hand.

It does not sound like a lack of will, skill or some kind of apprehension in your post- just sounds like an inner ear that does not equal your enthusiasm.
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  #9  
Old 01-22-2018, 05:32 PM
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greghughespdx greghughespdx is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Aurora, OR
Posts: 1,037
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Suggestions:

1. Be well hydrated. This is a huge air sickness cause.

2. Make sure you are well-rested. Again, a huge cause.

3. Look at the horizon.

4. Put your hands and feet on the controls. Much better than being the passenger.
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Building RV-8A since Sept 2014
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  #10  
Old 01-22-2018, 05:36 PM
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hydroguy2 hydroguy2 is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Townsend, Montana
Posts: 3,179
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Take a day and don't train. Grab your CFI and Plan a 30-45minute flight for lunch or a "simple get a water and walk around stop". Normal take-off, climb high to the smooth cool air, keep it high until close to stay out of the heat and bumps. Walk around, stretch and do it in reverse. Keep it simple, NO learning! let your instructor or pilot friend do all the thinking (maybe even the take-off and landing). partially getting info overload is my guess.
You need to get back to enjoying flight.

at least it worked for me many years ago. good luck
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