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  #11  
Old 11-15-2011, 08:20 PM
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John Clark John Clark is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donaziza View Post
Well, I thought I could tell ATC what I want to do, and if they can accept me, and simply go where they want me to go, Im in. ( I'm intrument qualified)
If you are "rated and equipped" and have the proper O2 system it is a non-issue, just pick a place clear of airways to keep it simple for the controller and request a block altitude. I have "been there and done that," I gave up at FL210, as it was very cold and not fun. Our short winged RVs really aren't happy at those altitudes. As a test pilot friend once said, "A little like balancing a bowling ball on a knitting needle".

John Clark ATP, CFI
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RV8 N18U "Sunshine"
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  #12  
Old 11-15-2011, 08:58 PM
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Ironflight Ironflight is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Clark View Post
If you are "rated and equipped" and have the proper O2 system it is a non-issue, just pick a place clear of airways to keep it simple for the controller and request a block altitude. I have "been there and done that," I gave up at FL210, as it was very cold and not fun. Our short winged RVs really aren't happy at those altitudes. As a test pilot friend once said, "A little like balancing a bowling ball on a knitting needle".
Excatly what I did, with similar results. Fun to do...for awhile!
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  #13  
Old 11-15-2011, 11:17 PM
mkburcar mkburcar is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Seattle, WA
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Guys,

I had to chime in on this one. I completely understand the excitement and gratification in exploring the performance of your home built airplane. But I don't see the point in trying to play Wiley Post in a RV.

These are spectacular performing, fun airplanes. Why jeopardize that by trying to take them somewhere they really are not meant to go? High altitude is no where to play around and there are not a lot of "good" ways to get back down quickly either.

Have fun and fly safe.

Mark
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  #14  
Old 11-16-2011, 12:01 AM
Sig600 Sig600 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkburcar View Post
Guys,

I had to chime in on this one. I completely understand the excitement and gratification in exploring the performance of your home built airplane. But I don't see the point in trying to play Wiley Post in a RV.

These are spectacular performing, fun airplanes. Why jeopardize that by trying to take them somewhere they really are not meant to go? High altitude is no where to play around and there are not a lot of "good" ways to get back down quickly either.

Have fun and fly safe.

Mark
+1

If you must do it though to satisfy the inner adventurer, do it right with a new and proper O2 system.

Second hand military gear is dangerous. Remember, it's built by the lowest bidder and our gear is inspected regularly and often by pros. If it fails so much as a leak check they toss it and we get new stuff. Guess where that discarded gear sometimes winds up?

Make sure you have an out too, chopping the throttle and stuffing the nose if you have to come down fast is a great way to not only shock cool the engine, but blow right through Vne.
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Last edited by Sig600 : 11-16-2011 at 12:05 AM.
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  #15  
Old 11-16-2011, 09:39 AM
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Mark12A Mark12A is offline
 
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Default High Altitude Stuff...

Also...it may have been mentioned here before...if you plan to go over FL240 there are some regulatory issues you have to address; and I understand the FAA aerospace medical folks at Ok City still provide high-altitude training. Military used to do it for civilian pilots, but they stopped. I believe the FAA training is free, but you have to schedule it.

Someone set me straight if I'm mis-remembering, but since my other computer got the blue screen of death, my memory is sort of hamstrung.
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  #16  
Old 11-16-2011, 10:38 AM
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John Clark John Clark is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark12A View Post
Also...it may have been mentioned here before...if you plan to go over FL240 there are some regulatory issues you have to address; and I understand the FAA aerospace medical folks at Ok City still provide high-altitude training. Military used to do it for civilian pilots, but they stopped. I believe the FAA training is free, but you have to schedule it.

Someone set me straight if I'm mis-remembering, but since my other computer got the blue screen of death, my memory is sort of hamstrung.
FAR 61.31(g) covers the training requirements for operating over 25000 feet. Altitude chamber training isn't required, but I recommend it to anyone that flies. Experiencing hypoxia is a real education.

John Clark ATP, CFI
FAAST Team Representative
EAA Flight Advisor
RV8 N18U "Sunshine"
KSBA
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  #17  
Old 11-16-2011, 11:06 AM
RV8R999 RV8R999 is offline
 
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You don't have to actually go there to figure out how high you can get.

Pick your highest mission resprenstable cross-country alitude you might expect to fly such as 14,500ft MSL.

Climb at Vy recording your power and ROC to that alititude. You can reasonably extrapolate your absolute ceiling (O climb rate) and service ceilingt (100 FMP climb) from this data.

Its not perfect but close enough without having to jump through all those O2 and regulatory hoops and worries about canopies, high altitude engine fires, and Vne.

.02
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  #18  
Old 11-16-2011, 11:19 AM
RVnoob RVnoob is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donaziza View Post
... I would like to see how high I can get my plane just once just to see how high it will actually go. ...:
Someone has done this a few years ago. It was an RV8, IIRC. He did it in Ontario Canada. He has documented the planning and preparation in his website (quite extensive, including discussions with ATC). Unfortunately I can't find the website anymore. Maybe someone in Canada can help.
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  #19  
Old 11-16-2011, 11:35 AM
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longranger longranger is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RVnoob View Post
Someone has done this a few years ago. It was an RV8, IIRC. He did it in Ontario Canada. He has documented the planning and preparation in his website (quite extensive, including discussions with ATC). Unfortunately I can't find the website anymore. Maybe someone in Canada can help.
RV6: http://home.hiwaay.net/~sbuc/journal/high.html
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  #20  
Old 11-16-2011, 11:41 AM
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N546RV N546RV is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Clark View Post
FAR 61.31(g) covers the training requirements for operating over 25000 feet. Altitude chamber training isn't required, but I recommend it to anyone that flies. Experiencing hypoxia is a real education.

John Clark ATP, CFI
FAAST Team Representative
EAA Flight Advisor
RV8 N18U "Sunshine"
KSBA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UN3W4d-5RPo

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