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  #11  
Old 10-19-2015, 04:43 PM
A2022 A2022 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 2,425
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this booth will have some air dead zones. all the parts will be hanging, fairings, wing tips, cowl halves (upside down). the flow over these parts at eye level may be enough with 1500 cfm. if not, add another fan.
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  #12  
Old 10-19-2015, 07:59 PM
ijustwannafly's Avatar
ijustwannafly ijustwannafly is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Colorado
Posts: 248
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Cant wait to see how you progress with this project!

Try and keep us updated. Im very eager to see what you learn and how you make out.

Planning to do the same someday for myself if i ever get that far :roll eyes:

What paint products have you chosen?
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  #13  
Old 10-19-2015, 08:52 PM
A2022 A2022 is offline
 
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Posts: 2,425
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well, I've been reading about paint... so I'm doomed. Jet GLO Express sounds cool, I like the name "Jet". PPG? that doesn't sound exciting but there may be a store close to me. One guy says to use a high build primer. Why do I need high build primer on a clean alum surface? The other guy says I'm doomed. Hey, an eclipse jet took the runway when I was on short final on my last flight before I put the aircraft down for paint. Maybe that's a sign, "Jet". Any other ideas?
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  #14  
Old 10-19-2015, 09:26 PM
Kyle Boatright Kyle Boatright is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 5,142
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Melton View Post
well, I've been reading about paint... so I'm doomed. Jet GLO Express sounds cool, I like the name "Jet". PPG? that doesn't sound exciting but there may be a store close to me. One guy says to use a high build primer. Why do I need high build primer on a clean alum surface? The other guy says I'm doomed. Hey, an eclipse jet took the runway when I was on short final on my last flight before I put the aircraft down for paint. Maybe that's a sign, "Jet". Any other ideas?
If you have a PPG resource nearby, that's the way to go, regardless of whether you buy airplane paint or auto paint. The auto paints will probably be a bit easier to work with and less expensive.

High build primer is what you use as the final coat over fiberglass and/or other areas you plan to sand. Otherwise, it is just excess weight. On most of the airplane, you need a primer which will stick to aluminum and is compatible with your finished paint system.

As to whether you're doomed, that's up to you. Just like building an airplane, there is a process to follow. Follow it well and you'll be happy. As I wrote yesterday, paint something else first. A trash can, a few sheets of aluminum flashing from Home Depot, etc. Far better to make your mistakes on throw-away items than airplane parts. Also, unlike airplane parts, you don't have to strip or sand throw-away items when the paint quality is awful.
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Marietta, GA
2001 RV-6 N46KB
2019? (actually 2022) RV-10 N46BX
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  #15  
Old 10-19-2015, 09:29 PM
A2022 A2022 is offline
 
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ok, PPG it is.
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  #16  
Old 10-19-2015, 09:38 PM
RKellogg RKellogg is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Newark, IL
Posts: 287
Arrow paint booth ideas...

Steve, Looks like a good start!

Paint spray droplets and volitiles are denser than air and will settle to the floor. Sucking the air out at the lowest level will suck out the dirtiest air.

You might consider making a 4' x 8' (or larger) floor of 3/4 plywood on 2x4 joists, placed on top of your concrete floor. Drill about 400 3/4 inch diameter holes thru the floor, radius the edges of the holes with a 1/4 inch radius corner round router bit, then put a header box on one end with fiberglass hammock filter inside. Suck the air down thru the plywood floor holes, thru the joist spaces under the floor to the header, then draw the air out of the header above the fiberglass filters. Low air velocity in the headers will allow some of the paint droplets to drop out of the airflow before getting to the filters. A hinged cover allows easy access to inspect and change filters. 1/4 inch hardware cloth screen supports the hammock filter material, but chicken wire might work. I used two hammock filters in series. Changed them three times in the course of painting an RV-7A. No sign of overspray on the white exhaust outlet grill in the sidewall of the hanger.

Providing lots of filter area makes the airflow velocity low as it passes through the filter, maximizing the likelihood that sticky particles will stick to the filter and not to the neighbor's Mooney. A simple tygon tube manometer measures the pressure drop across the filters, alerting to filter change time. I used a furnace blower with good results. Quiet, low amperage, reliable, cheap. Exhausting the outlet air high through the sidewall or roof of the hanger on the downwind side makes the air safer in the hanger. I made a simple plywood chimney out of 1/2 inch plywood for the exhaust air. A gable vent grill dresses it up outside, keeps the rain and robins out.

Need to provide a filtered inlet for the air that is replacing the air that is getting sucked out, I used 20 sq ft of hammock filter up high, in the ceiling.

Place your breathing air unit high on a shelf so that it isn't picking up the volatiles that collect at floor level in the hanger. Nasty, nasty stuff, paint fumes. Pilots need all the brain cells they can retain.

Start the air flowing before starting spraying so that the concentration of flamables never gets up to the LEL (lower explosive limit). Leave blower running until volatiles are evaporated out of paint. Run a grounded bare copper wire through the airflow path to provide a ground for static. Evaluate each electrical light for safety / integrity, once read about a guy who dropped a trouble light while spraying and torched his just-freshly-painted fuselage. I use LED lights on an 18 inch wand as a hand light while spraying to be able to see reflections and gage coverage / sheen in remote corners of complex shapes.

Practice a bunch before painting real parts. Find a local expert/professional and make him a friend. Good advice is better than learning it all the hard way.

Expect your hanger floor inside the paint booth to change color... ...each time you change colors. I repaint mine with cheap white floor paint every so often to keep things bright.

Painting is hard work, I discovered a hundred ways to screw up a paint job. A good paint booth makes a difficult task easier to master and enjoy.

Maybe most of this is common sense or common knowledge, hope some of it was helpful.

It's an adventure! Best of luck!

- Roger
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  #17  
Old 10-19-2015, 09:48 PM
A2022 A2022 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 2,425
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Kyle, the PPG aviation website pictures are not impressive. what's up with that? where's the marketing? especially that lower picture on the left.


Last edited by A2022 : 10-19-2015 at 09:56 PM.
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  #18  
Old 10-20-2015, 07:03 AM
gordodavis gordodavis is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Lexington, KY
Posts: 45
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Hey Roger, do you have any photos of your paint booth you wrote about?

-Gordon
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  #19  
Old 10-20-2015, 07:09 AM
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Fearless Fearless is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Crestwood, KY
Posts: 850
Default Good luck Steve

I bought the 8" inch duct fan and 20ft ducting from Northern Tools (which I would like to sell). The paint booth I built was 10 X 20. It wouldn't clear the area that well. I then went to two 20" box fans with two 16 X 25 filters in my doors. That went better but still doesn't clear the booth as fast as I need. You will need some filters for input air as well. I sprayed my plane using Kirker products due to Smart Shoppers being close to me and supposedly cheaper. I used way more paint than I anticipated. On the RV12, my brother and I are building, I am spraying with PPG Concept. On some areas I get good coatings and on the same part in other areas I get more orange peel. It doesn't seem to matter if it was the Kirker or the PPG paint I am getting the same results on the parts so my shortcomings must be attributed to painting technique, booth and/or paint tools. I am using a DeVilbiss FG4 gun to shot things. I am following the paint tech sheets. Shooting primer is a no brainer. It's the color that things get complicated. My plane results is probably a two footer. I have seen some planes painted by so called professionals that don't look any better than mine. So far I have only painted one part on the 12 and that was a flaperon and I wasn't fond of the overall results. Most importantly is using a respirator system. I am using a BreatheCool hooded system from Turbine Products when spraying. I use a regular respirator when mixing paint.
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Last edited by Fearless : 10-20-2015 at 07:16 AM.
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  #20  
Old 10-20-2015, 07:22 AM
Vansconvert Vansconvert is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Racine, WI
Posts: 244
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I am using a full-size dust collector that wood-workers hook up to suck up the sawdust as they are planning/etc. It has a 4 inch hose on it that really sucks it in. I put a T on it and have 2 4 inch hoses on one end of the booth near the floor, and on the other end are cheap furnace air filters up high. So I get a very nice sweep of air, and it really works great.
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