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  #11  
Old 11-11-2021, 04:38 AM
TASEsq TASEsq is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Thanks for all the advice.

I did the big twist and it worked nicely. Clamped one end of the spar down to the bench, then twisted and checked etc. Took about 5 steps to get it true. Then riveted the nose ribs to the spar, and afterward it was still true.

Hopefully this will prevent a twisted aileron later on by getting it sorted now. I tend to think the "d" cell is basically set now. the nose ribs are basically holding the skins and spars together - i don't see how they can move much anymore.

The first 3 photos show the setup - the last 2 show the twist before and after riveting.

Thanks again for everyones help.
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  #12  
Old 11-11-2021, 09:41 AM
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rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
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The waviness of the skin, and twist that you showed in your first photos is totally normal for an assembly that has a skin that has been been rolled and press formed like the aileron nose skins have.
Twist related alignment in an assembly becomes locked in when the "box" is closed.
In the context of this assembly, that will be when the riveting on the spar gets done (that will be closing the box on the nose section of the aileron).
So to minimize the likelihood of twist in the aileron, you need to assure it is flat and twist free while the top and bottom flanges of the spar are riveted.
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  #13  
Old 11-14-2021, 03:38 PM
TASEsq TASEsq is offline
 
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Thanks Scott,

Appreciate your input.

Keeping the assembly twist free while riveting the skins to the flanges is very difficult - I've found a digital level to be almost too precise to tell if it is ok. The winding sticks work much better but can't be used on the skins.

Any suggestions?
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  #14  
Old 11-14-2021, 10:25 PM
mc607 mc607 is offline
 
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Not sure why you say you can’t use winding sticks on the skin. Tape them to the top or bottom skin. They’ll be pointing up toward the ceiling, if your aileron is in the cradles, but it’ll work. You can also check the aft, inboard and outboard corners of the top and bottom skins before you rivet the bottom skin. They should line up exactly. If they’re out then there may be a twist. Also, follow the rivet pattern in the plans for the bottom skin. Check frequently for twist.
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  #15  
Old 11-15-2021, 05:05 AM
Mark Browning Mark Browning is offline
 
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Location: Doncaster England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bavafa View Post
Did you cleco the trailing edge to to the steel box or other area of the aileron/flap.
I have done similar method for the trailing edge of the rudder using angle instead of a box but it seems the concept is about the same.
Yes i used the box section in the same way for the flap and rudder
I also used a perfectly flat work bench to constantly check for zero twist
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  #16  
Old 11-15-2021, 11:05 AM
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rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TASEsq View Post
Thanks Scott,

Appreciate your input.

Keeping the assembly twist free while riveting the skins to the flanges is very difficult - I've found a digital level to be almost too precise to tell if it is ok. The winding sticks work much better but can't be used on the skins.

Any suggestions?
Our experience is that if Step 7 & 8 are followed, it produces a good result.

A bubble level can be used instead of a digital level. If the bubble visually appears to be in the same position at both ends of the spar, you should get a good result.
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FAA/DAR
RV-6A (aka "Junkyard Special ")
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