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  #11  
Old 05-08-2021, 03:24 PM
RV8iator's Avatar
RV8iator RV8iator is offline
 
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Default Why shove it to the wall?

I'm wondering why people go "balls to the wall" on go around. Smooth application of power as needed unless you are crashing into the ground. To blindly shove full power up on a go around is in 99.9% of ALL go arounds just not necessary.

Just "IMHO"
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  #12  
Old 05-08-2021, 03:36 PM
sailvi767 sailvi767 is offline
 
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I concur with the smooth application of power on a go around. Go arounds on even much larger aircraft can be challenging for pitch up with the 757 bring a good example. Boeing even added software to reduce power and limit ROC to 2000 feet a minute.
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  #13  
Old 05-08-2021, 04:53 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RV8iator View Post
I'm wondering why people go "balls to the wall" on go around. Smooth application of power as needed unless you are crashing into the ground. To blindly shove full power up on a go around is in 99.9% of ALL go arounds just not necessary.

Just "IMHO"
I think this is an example of the ‘first learned, best remembered’ law of primacy in learning. Put two people in a 152, full flaps, a bit under 60 kias, and it pretty much takes full throttle to go around. And that’s what is remembered.
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  #14  
Old 05-08-2021, 06:18 PM
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RV8iator RV8iator is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobTurner View Post
I think this is an example of the ‘first learned, best remembered’ law of primacy in learning. Put two people in a 152, full flaps, a bit under 60 kias, and it pretty much takes full throttle to go around. And that’s what is remembered.
Then I submit people need more, better, training. Cramming the power in just because is just not necessary. Maybe on a bolter off a carrier, not in 99.9% of go arounds.
Of course, opinions are worth what you pay for them. I will say that in 53 years and 27 plus thousands hours of flying most types from cubs to 1011’s I’ve never had to cram the throttles full forward except in a simulator for severe wind shear. In my 8, nah!
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  #15  
Old 05-08-2021, 06:46 PM
Renfield Renfield is offline
 
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Being smooth on the controls usually goes a long way towards preventing unnecessary excitement. One of my first instructors demanded smoothness. A rap on the back of my head from the back seat of the Champ was a sufficient reminder.

Executing a smooth, safe go-around to the point it’s second nature is a skill well worth practicing in any plane.
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  #16  
Old 05-08-2021, 07:28 PM
PilotjohnS PilotjohnS is offline
 
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Thanks to this thread, I am going to try a few go arounds with a slower application of power. Last go around got exciting because the power came on too fast and caused a pitch up due to P-factor.
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  #17  
Old 05-08-2021, 09:41 PM
n982sx n982sx is offline
 
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In my 14 I do not go to full power in a go around for this reason.

I increase power smoothly as I start bringing the flaps up and retriming. It doesn't take a lot of throttle in the 14 to arrest the descent and start climbing in the landing configuration.

There is plenty of power there if you need to go to full throttle immediately but you will need to push hard to keep pitch under control.
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  #18  
Old 05-09-2021, 12:48 AM
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pierre smith pierre smith is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PilotjohnS View Post
Thanks to this thread, I am going to try a few go arounds with a slower application of power. Last go around got exciting because the power came on too fast and caused a pitch up due to P-factor.
‘P-factor’ is not responsible for pitch up. P factor causes left yaw in our airplanes because the down-swinging propeller blades have a higher angle of attack than the up-swinging blade.

Pitch up has more to do with the existing up trim that was made during the approach, with throttle reduction. Thrust now causes the elevators to make the airplane pitch up unless you stop it by pushing down elevator.

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  #19  
Old 05-09-2021, 06:13 AM
Desert Rat Desert Rat is offline
 
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I used to do a of annual insurance checkouts and transition training, BFRs etc. and one thing I've noticed over the years is that a lot of people have never been taught the relationship between trim and airspeed. I should preface this by saying that I've never flown an RV14, but what you're describing is common to pretty much any airplane thats dynamically stable. Somebody mentioned a C-182 and it's a prefect example.

Sure, you trim to neutralize pitch forces, but if you come in with a bunch of power, most airplanes are going to pitch up until they find a climb angle that will have neutral pitch force on the stick at that same airspeed. If you reduce power, they will lower the nose to start a glide at the same previously trimmed airspeed.

Close to the ground isn't the place to be monkeying around with this, but the point is that if you're on approach at 65 kts and trimmed for neutral elevator at that speeding add a a ton of power, then yeah, the airplane is going to pitch up. Its trying to maintain 65 kts due to where the trim is, and the only way it can do that with all that power you just abruptly dumped on it is to pitch up like crazy
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Last edited by Desert Rat : 05-09-2021 at 06:16 AM.
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  #20  
Old 05-09-2021, 08:37 AM
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Toobuilder Toobuilder is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RV8iator View Post
I'm wondering why people go "balls to the wall" on go around. Smooth application of power as needed unless you are crashing into the ground. To blindly shove full power up on a go around is in 99.9% of ALL go arounds just not necessary.

Just "IMHO"
JMHO, but a "go around" is by definition an abnormal condition - trained as a borderline emergency procedure. Yes, most are routine, but if one is to "train like you fly and fly like you train", then its quite appropriate to extract all the performance of the airplane on every go around, because that's exactly what your want your lizard brain muscle memory to revert to on those rare occasions that it IS a real emergency.

If a pilot is able to differentiate between a "real" go around and a "routine" go around when the airport truck enters the runway or wind shear strikes AND that pilot is adept at the difference between trim forces of a "balls to the wall" emergency and a "gentle" go around then that pilot is better than me.
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