VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

-POSTING RULES
-Advertise in here!
- Today's Posts | Insert Pics

Keep VAF Going
Donate methods

Point your
camera app here
to donate fast.


Go Back   VAF Forums > Main > Safety
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #21  
Old 12-09-2016, 08:11 PM
Dreamin9 Dreamin9 is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Near Buffalo, NY
Posts: 69
Default

Your goal is 91% or better.
Depending on many variables as mentioned above, O2 may be needed at rather modest altitudes or possibly high.
Get a cheap oximeter and under various conditions learn at what altitude(s) your levels drop to 91%.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 12-09-2016, 09:31 PM
PCHunt PCHunt is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 1,724
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Low Pass View Post
.................On a cross country, I'll use a minimum to keep me clear headed and what I feel is out of headache zone. I want to be functional but not waste all my O2. When it comes time for dealing with crowded airspace, approaches, etc. I'll turn it up. How much? Enough to make my brain work better. And I can almost always feel the difference as I increase flow. Point being, it's not black and white and each situation differs somewhat. The O2 sat meter just gets you in the ballpark.
My concern about this approach is how are you measuring your "brain power". You can NOT depend on your own perceptions of how well you are doing.

Low Oxygen Saturation in the blood produces a feeling of "euphoria", and it is nearly impossible for someone who is hypoxic to properly assess themselves. That's why a pulse oximeter is so important. If you stay above 90%, you will be safe.
__________________
Pete Hunt, [San Diego] VAF #1069
RV-6, RV-6A, T-6G
ATP, CFII, A&P

2021 Donation+, Gladly Sent
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 12-09-2016, 09:45 PM
SmackSB4 SmackSB4 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Up north eh
Posts: 28
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCHunt View Post
My concern about this approach is how are you measuring your "brain power". You can NOT depend on your own perceptions of how well you are doing.

Low Oxygen Saturation in the blood produces a feeling of "euphoria", and it is nearly impossible for someone who is hypoxic to properly assess themselves. That's why a pulse oximeter is so important. If you stay above 90%, you will be safe.
Couldn't agree more. I took part in the high altitude chamber in college and was shocked at how insidious and scary the effect was. Even as low as 12,000, it took about an hour, but at the end of that hour, I thought Bill Clinton was legitimately a Canadian Prime minister.

Oximeter and oxygen above 8 for sure.
__________________
Brandon Simunac
Regional driver in Canada
RV Wannabe. Just soaking up knowledge for now
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 12-09-2016, 09:56 PM
SmackSB4 SmackSB4 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Up north eh
Posts: 28
Default

Sorry for derailing the topic.

I was always told that you can exhale through the cannulas, but the oximeter is definitely the way to go to confirm it.
__________________
Brandon Simunac
Regional driver in Canada
RV Wannabe. Just soaking up knowledge for now
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 12-09-2016, 10:06 PM
Bavafa Bavafa is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 3,523
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by scsmith View Post
If you really want to save O2, and be sure that you are getting exactly the proper O2 delivery all the time, you should check out the Mountain High electronic O2 delivery system.

Most all of us in gliders are using this system nowadays.
I have it and love it. I have timed it and can last me for more than 22 hours around 14-15K (one person) when it is set to dispense Oxygen at 10K. It last for more than 11 hours when flying two people.
__________________
Mehrdad
N825SM RV7A - IO360M1B - SOLD
N825MS RV14A - IO390 - Flying
Dues paid
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 12-10-2016, 06:09 AM
roadrunner20's Avatar
roadrunner20 roadrunner20 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Bay Pines, FL, building in Andrews, NC (new base @ KRHP)
Posts: 1,957
Default

I agree with others regarding an oximeter. I always have it available & will usually attach it when on AP cruise, just to establish a baseline monitor.
__________________
Danny "RoadRunner" Landry
Morphed RV7(formally 7A), N20DL, PnP Pilot
1200+ hours
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 12-10-2016, 08:17 AM
Gisnar Gisnar is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Northern Nevada
Posts: 137
Default

Trust but verify! Pulse oximeters are a useful check. If you are a lowlander or fly at night use O2 at a lower altitude than 12000 ft. Same goes for if you smoke (rather than fume) have a cold, or any lung or heart problems.
The FAA has a O2 chamber that goes around the USA, will be in Reno, NV next week. Everyone has a different O2 saturation threshold....some can tolerate 85% others need 92%. We also all react differently and it is good to know when you are not performing well!
That said I really like flying at 12-17000 ft. Faster ground speed, less fuel and less traffic. Have fun and stay safe.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 12-10-2016, 09:40 AM
DanH's Avatar
DanH DanH is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: 08A
Posts: 9,894
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gisnar View Post
The FAA has a O2 chamber that goes around the USA, will be in Reno, NV next week.
Looks like there are seats available on the 15th, 16th, and 17th.

Here's the 15th:

https://www.faasafety.gov/SPANS/even...EventList.aspx
__________________
Dan Horton
RV-8 SS
Barrett IO-390
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 12-10-2016, 10:27 AM
guccidude1 guccidude1 is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Reno NV
Posts: 548
Default Correct usage of Oxygen

20 years ago, I use to fly solo 12K and below all the time. My wife would complain of a headache on anything greater than 9k, so I purchased an oxygen system "for my wife". What I immediately notice was my wife no longer complained of headaches and I didn't feel so tired and beat up after a couple 2-3 hour hops on cross country flights. No facts to support, but the older we get the more I think O2 is needed, especially age mid 40s and above. As mentioned above, you are the least qualified person to determine if you are suffering hypoxia symptoms without altitude chamber training or a pulse meter. As they say, I "never leave home without it". Dan from Reno
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 12-11-2016, 01:51 AM
climberrn's Avatar
climberrn climberrn is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Carson City, NV
Posts: 593
Default

Flew for the first 200 hours without O2. Wife has a SPO2 monitor, and we would routinely drop below 90 on flights above 10k. Never got a headache but would feel tired for the rest of the day. Keep in mind, our house is at 4,800 feet, and we hike and ski in the Sierras at 8-12k.

Installed a tank from AEROX with the oxysaver cannulas. Titrate the flow rate to keep saturation above 92%. 95% and above is better (unless you have COPD, then consult your doctor!!). The pulse oximeters are sold on Amazon for $20. There is no reason not to spot check in flight. One is clipped on the shoulder harness of our plane at all times.

Now, when we arrive at our destination, we feel much better. Dan Ross, and a few others told me to use O2 a while ago. Glad I finally got it installed.

By the way, the the oxysaver cannulas work By acting as a resivor. The O2 flows at a constant rate (unless you are using a pulse demand system). The resivor stores the oxygen dispensed from the tank during exhalation, which would be wasted with a simple cannula. Upon inhalation, you breathe the stored oxygen. According to AEROX, you can get he same O2 intake using 1/4th the flow.
__________________
Joel

N626JA
RV-7A at CXP
Flying!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:12 AM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.