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  #1  
Old 12-02-2016, 06:51 PM
scrockard scrockard is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Oregon City
Posts: 59
Question How to get ready for that first flight?

So, lets suppose that you have hundreds of hours of accumulated time in C-172 and PA28-180?s. Lets also suppose that due to building and bad weather, your flying skills are rusty (but still FAA current).

What do you do for practicing proficiency in order to get ready for the first flight in an RV-9a? I'm primarily interested in the first 10 hours while new engine break in, new aircraft glitches, etc are all happening.

(let me fill in the blanks for the first three answers)
  • get transition training?
  • get a buddy to let you fly their RV-9a?
  • read all of Van's articles, AC90-89, etc.
  • ?


What else do you guys do in a C-172 or PA28-180 to prepare? What skills? What proficiency tests do you practice? When do you know that you are ready?
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  #2  
Old 12-02-2016, 07:25 PM
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Vern Vern is offline
 
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Location: Peachtree City, Ga
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Default Practice

1-Practice staying on runway centerline during all takeoffs and landings. The power and acceleration of the RV will surprise you. It is easy to head for the bushes.

2-Just about everyone drags a brake on takeoff. Don't!
When you begin the takeoff roll, place your feet on the outside of the rudder pedal frame so you can't drag a brake

3-There is no centering on the stick so you might lift off and roll into an immediate bank. Be aware

4-On landings, do not allow the nose to plop down after touchdown. Maintain the back pressure and increase it as the plane slows. The nose wheel is a taxi gear, not a landing gear!

Anyone else?
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  #3  
Old 12-02-2016, 07:49 PM
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Ironflight Ironflight is offline
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Location: Dayton, NV
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Default

Statistically, the most likely mechancial problem that can easily kill you is an engine out - the engine will be fine, it'll be a subsystem, or lack of fuel getting to the motor. So practice, practice, practice engine outs - and do plenty of them to a full stop on a runway. The problem will be that the airplanes you mention won't drop like an RV with the engine out - so you need to get used to barely making the runway from low key - with a tight pattern.

The other thing to remember is that Transition Training is not First Flight Training. Ask yourself if you know how you react in emergency-like situations, and what your response will be. That will help you know if first flights are for you or not. It is not a big deal to have someone else do your first flight - you'll always have your own first flight in the airplane.

The last thing I tell people is that you can expect alarms and the unexpected in the early flights, - and most of the time, they will be false alarms due to instrumentation issues or incorrectly set limits. If the big fan up front is still driving the airplane, you have control, and aren't on fire, ignore the alarms. Fly the airplane. Troubleshoot it on the ground. Condition yourself to doing that every time.

Paul
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  #4  
Old 12-02-2016, 07:49 PM
BillL BillL is offline
 
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Location: Central IL
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Default

You are in Oregon, get a bit of transition training from Mike Seager. THE RV man.
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  #5  
Old 12-02-2016, 10:06 PM
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Dbro172 Dbro172 is offline
 
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Default

Have other sets of eyes look over your plane.

Make sure to test the fuel system for leaks and verify fuel flow. My DAR requested a list of info prior to his inspection, of which was a fuel flow test. This process revealed a leak in my system due to a bad flare... Which was good to get sorted out prior to first flight.
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  #6  
Old 12-02-2016, 11:09 PM
scrockard scrockard is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Oregon City
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Default

This is all great advice so far - keep the ideas going!
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  #7  
Old 12-03-2016, 04:38 PM
rightrudder rightrudder is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Laguna Hills, CA
Posts: 1,843
Default

You'll find this out during transition training, but the P-factor/spiraling slipstream effect is more pronounced than in a lot of other GA planes, and RVs have very generous rudders to deal with this.

I found that the rudder was distinctly higher effort/shorter throw than the Cherokee 140s and 172s I've flown, and that it was easy to overcorrect a bit in the takeoff roll, even with trike gear. No big deal; a few takeoffs in transition training and you'll be an ace at it.

Also, know your airport and the environment around it. Find your best options for an off-airport landing on upwind, crosswind, and downwind legs. I drove around my airport looking at roads, fields, and where power lines and overpasses were. Google Earth can help a lot here.

The -9s tend to float quite a bit on landing, so be prepared to go around on your first approach if necessary.
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Last edited by rightrudder : 12-03-2016 at 04:42 PM.
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  #8  
Old 12-03-2016, 06:08 PM
thinkn9a thinkn9a is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 287
Default Read and listen to experts !

And here are a few other things,..from a non-expert

1) ensure you are prepared to let the insurance compnay have the plane

2) do everything you can to prevent rule 1, but always be ready to invoke rule 1


Remember the AC is now up to Rev B

Plan your test cards,...print your test card,... "Walk through" your test cards,.. Now walk through cards with instruments, and indications are not indicating correctly,....alarms are going off ( in error) ,....now,.walk through and They are correct,..and you do have problems

Remember it is a short test flight,...not photo ops or,....AND ,..when you get done,..and calmed down,... Pull the cowl and take a look

And remember do it right,..and you get to go fly it again. 😀😃
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  #9  
Old 12-03-2016, 06:46 PM
cajunwings cajunwings is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: new iberia la
Posts: 826
Default First flight

All good suggestions from the VAF crew. Try to get some time in a 9A before first flight. Ideally with the eng/prop combination you have. I'm a hi-time pilot with 6A experience and found the 9A pitch sensitive at low speeds in the flare compared to other aircraft. Also it has a very good glide ratio above 75-80kts, but at around 60kts it will come down at a fairly high sink rate. It's light and powerful compared to the planes you mentioned. Be safe.

Don Broussard

RV-9 Rebuild in Progress
57 Pacer
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  #10  
Old 12-03-2016, 06:50 PM
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az_gila az_gila is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: 57AZ - NW Tucson area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dbro172 View Post
....

Make sure to test the fuel system for leaks and verify fuel flow. My DAR requested a list of info prior to his inspection, of which was a fuel flow test. This process revealed a leak in my system due to a bad flare... Which was good to get sorted out prior to first flight.
Even if you don't want to use the new FAA Additional Pilot rule, the engine system tests specified in AC 90-116 make a lot of sense -

b. Powerplant Testing. Powerplant testing is required prior to the initial flight and any time warranted thereafter to help ensure the reliability of the powerplant. Based on the recommendations of AC 90-89 and the industry on testing of the powerplant and fuel system, the following tests, if applicable, are required:
? Mixture and Idle Speed Check,
? Magneto Check,
? Cold Cylinder Check,
? Carburetor Heat Check,
? Fuel Flow Check,
? Unusable Fuel Check, and
? Compression Check.

c. Documented Testing. Documented testing similar to that of the build is required as proof of compliance. This includes appropriate logbook entries with test results. Photographs and diagrams should also be provided for tests where the applicant deems them beneficial or necessary.
d. Changes to Fuel System. Any change to the fuel system after conducting the fuel flow tests, except for normal fuel system/filter maintenance, requires a repeat of the tests prior to additional flight. All tests, including repeated tests, require documentation.

d. Changes to Fuel System. Any change to the fuel system after conducting the fuel flow tests, except for normal fuel system/filter maintenance, requires a repeat of the tests prior to additional flight. All tests, including repeated tests, require documentation.


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