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  #1  
Old 03-03-2021, 06:50 AM
olyolson's Avatar
olyolson olyolson is offline
 
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Default Lycoming vs Superior cylinders

My engine is getting an overhaul at Aerosport Power. They just informed me yesterday that the OEM Lycoming cylinders ordered for my engine are delayed and will add a month or so to the build time. They asked if I wanted to use Superior cylinders to stay on schedule. Iím bumping up the compression to 9:5:1 and donít know the big differences between the two cylinders. Some of my buddies say Superior are good cylinders and some say wait for the Lycomings.

Superior has a crank AD and I know thatís comparing apples to oranges but does Superior have a quality control issue?

Curious what the brain trust thinks.......... Superior or wait for the Lycoming parts?
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  #2  
Old 03-03-2021, 09:15 AM
Freemasm Freemasm is offline
 
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Default

Pardon me for being one of "those" people that quote anonymous sources. I don't have a position, just passing along some info. Most of the experiences I've had with Superior cylinders, both directly and indirectly have been at least neutral to positive versus OEM jugs on Lycomings. The big bore Continental users I know all swear the Superiors get better life than the OEM; not exactly relevant to you, I know. Just saying Superior isn't new to the game.

When shopping for a final powerplant config and builder the last few months, I heard from different shops (well known players) that Lyc had brought the cylinder manufacturing back in-house. The common statements were about quality issues and delays. These were not lycoming competitors; rather, they were dependent on Lyc cores and parts for their livelihoods which adds credence at least in my mind. This is why I haven't named names. Maybe the relearning curve at Lyc has flattened and the story changed. Anyone know? Another question to ask is if different jugs require other changes (true for Continental supplied jugs for Lycs. Cooling baffles changes required) Anyway, you have choices between new/overhauled, OEM/non, cyl wall treatments, etc. Get as much info as possible from unbiased people as possible and save yourself any related time/money/heatache/etc. Best of luck. Let us know what you find.
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  #3  
Old 03-03-2021, 09:28 AM
vic syracuse vic syracuse is offline
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Default

Continental choices are a good option for the Lycomings as well. We've installed a few of them lately. The rings come pre-gapped, and they break in super fast.

We've bee getting them from Air Power Inc with no delays.

Vic
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  #4  
Old 03-03-2021, 11:13 AM
lr172 lr172 is offline
 
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I went with Surperior on the 10 O/H and happy. I really liked the through hardened barrels, though Continental has these as well. I found a cracked ring at 100 hours and they sent me a brand new cyl assembly under warranty. I almost went with the Conti's, as they were the only ones final honing at 400 grit (for faster break in).
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  #5  
Old 03-04-2021, 07:18 AM
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olyolson olyolson is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lr172 View Post
I went with Surperior on the 10 O/H and happy. I really liked the through hardened barrels, though Continental has these as well. I found a cracked ring at 100 hours and they sent me a brand new cyl assembly under warranty. I almost went with the Conti's, as they were the only ones final honing at 400 grit (for faster break in).
A cracked ring at 100 hours doesn’t make the the Superior decision likely. Good that they sent brand new parts but doesn’t give me confidence in Superior. Once I get the engine back on I do not relish being down for maintenance on a brand new engine.

I expect the chances of any issues with the Superior cylinders are relatively slim but most of the advice outside this forum is also having me lean to waiting for the Lycoming cylinders. Thanks for the inputs everyone.
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  #6  
Old 03-04-2021, 08:48 AM
lr172 lr172 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by olyolson View Post
A cracked ring at 100 hours doesn’t make the the Superior decision likely. Good that they sent brand new parts but doesn’t give me confidence in Superior. Once I get the engine back on I do not relish being down for maintenance on a brand new engine.

I expect the chances of any issues with the Superior cylinders are relatively slim but most of the advice outside this forum is also having me lean to waiting for the Lycoming cylinders. Thanks for the inputs everyone.
For the record, I don't blame the cracked ring on superior. Far more likely that I accidentally cracked the ring on installation. I have done many, however, the ring compressor is challenging to use on the thin bore wall at the bottom.
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  #7  
Old 03-04-2021, 01:34 PM
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Roadjunkie1 Roadjunkie1 is offline
 
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Default Lycoming vs Superior cylinders.

I've run Superior cylinders on the C90-8 Continental on the Cub for years and am nothing but happy. I think their design is better that the Continental as far as fin design and cooling properties. Continental engines of any power are famous for valve sticking. I have not had a valve stick with the Superior cylinders with now hundreds of hours on them. Granted, this is not vs a Lycoming but I believe their cylinders are a superior design. And MAY be easier to obtain than Lycoming.
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  #8  
Old 03-06-2021, 06:42 AM
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olyolson olyolson is offline
 
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Default Cylinders

Decision solved, got an update from Aerosport that my cylinders left Lycoming yesterday. Now the discussion is whether I want 9:5:1 pistons and the risk that 100 octane may not be available forever. Is the extra 15 hp worth the risk......
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