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  #21  
Old 01-29-2016, 06:42 PM
Chkaharyer99 Chkaharyer99 is offline
 
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Location: Pilot Hill, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironflight View Post
There's one just down the street from us that has been listed at $50K....originally sold for four times that amount back in the boom!
Karen and I will be looking at that one this weekend on our way to Idaho.

The ICF building system looks viable for a home and hangar Mike. Very energy efficient and sturdy.
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  #22  
Old 01-29-2016, 06:48 PM
Mike S's Avatar
Mike S Mike S is offline
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Location: Dayton Airpark, NV A34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chkaharyer99 View Post

The ICF building system looks viable for a home and hangar Mike. Very energy efficient and sturdy.
Yep sure does. But then when a seller of a product is doing the talking, it will always look good.

Same is true for Insulated Metal Panels, and Structural Insulated Panels

I am looking for input from folks with personal knowledge of these systems, either from being an owner, or a builder.
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  #23  
Old 01-29-2016, 06:50 PM
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Mike S Mike S is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Arehart View Post
Mike,

I built a superinsulated house in CO ~30 years ago and used ICF for the foundation. Very warm, easy to do. I also used ICF on a (large) cabin before that, and it worked well.

Greg
Thanks Greg----that is the kind of info I am looking for.
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VAF 909

Rv-10, N210LM.

Flying as of 12/4/2010

Phase 1 done, 2/4/2011

Sold after 240+ wonderful hours of flight.

"Flying the airplane is more important than radioing your plight to a person on the ground incapable of understanding or doing anything about it."
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  #24  
Old 01-29-2016, 08:07 PM
n180tf n180tf is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: TN
Posts: 44
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I am a GC and an ICF builder. I have built a few complete homes with ICF. They are a hard sell around here (East TN) because they do cost more than traditional methods, and most people who move to this area do so because it is a cheap place to live. They are too tight to pay the premium.

If I ever build another personal house it will be all ICF. If I lived in an area with temperature or weather extremes (coastal/desert) then ICF is for sure the way to go for new construction. Figure 10-15% premium over stick built and you will be safe. Using either stucco or EFIS over ICF is very straightforward, and will actually be cheaper than going over a "normally" framed house. With the ICF there is no prep. The stucco crew will apply right on top of the ICF. For a whole house you do want a contractor who is experienced with ICF. For a foundation or even a hangar, then maybe you can get by with someone less experienced.

On the hangar the price premium is going to be higher, just cause there is a lot of wall area, and that means a lot of ICF, steel, and concrete. But again, if you are going with stucco exterior, that may be a wash because of the savings vs prepping another method for finish.

Around here we use SIPs for the roof systems on timber frame homes. I have never seen panel systems used for walls, although there are a bunch of different types of precast/panel type deals for foundations walls. ICFs work for it all. If you want the house really tight, use ICF for the foundation and walls, and insulate the underside of the roof with closed cell spray foam. In that case you have to be sure you get enough air exchange so that the moisture can escape.

If you can afford the initial expense, you will not be disappointed with ICF. If you are looking for a long-term home, this is the way to go.

Tom Flaglor
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  #25  
Old 01-29-2016, 09:49 PM
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Dbro172 Dbro172 is offline
 
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Location: West Fargo, ND
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I've built a couple basements with ICF's and one house with gable ends to the peak with ICFs. That was 19 years ago, I was 17 and remember snapping all those nylon ties between the foam blocks, laying the rebar in, etc. there was also some lacing at the corners and around Windows. so you see these things have been around for awhile but really haven't taken flight because they are cost prohibitive. It certainly is an efficient brick xxxx house but a bit overkill.

The interior still needs to be furred out with stud walls in order to run electrical and plumbing....

Heck the way they build stick frame homes now with all the tyvek and spray foam they are very tight and efficient. Bought a new home about a year ago and I've had to run a dehumidifier non stop.
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  #26  
Old 01-29-2016, 11:53 PM
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Louise Hose Louise Hose is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chkaharyer99 View Post
Karen and I will be looking at that one this weekend on our way to Idaho.
Drop by and say "Hi". We'll probably be around Saturday and at least part of Sunday. DVA is a wonderful place to live!
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  #27  
Old 01-30-2016, 07:12 AM
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bret bret is offline
 
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When I bought a house and moved up here to the eastern sierras 16 years ago, I never thought about living on an airpark, wasn't building at the time either, but now looking at 300.00 + a month for a hanger at KMEV, those additional funds could go toward a house-hanger on an airpark............Hum.....
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  #28  
Old 01-30-2016, 07:24 AM
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rmartingt rmartingt is offline
 
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My thoughts after building a workshop:

The more electrical you have, the better. Get the biggest amperage panel you can (300A?). Put outlets everywhere. In your garage/shop/hangar space, put the outlets high enough up that they won't be blocked if you lay a 4x8 sheet of plywood against the wall. Run a couple of 220 outlets for compressors, car chargers, etc. If you can, get your main panel or a subpanel in that space, too, and try to make sure your panel is accessible to an exterior wall so if you ever need to run power outside, you can do it easily. Anywhere you even think you might possibly one day want an outlet, go ahead and run power there. It's a lot easier to do it during construction than afterwards.

If you don't do SIP or ICF, at least use 2x6 studs so you can put more insulation in the walls.
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  #29  
Old 01-30-2016, 08:26 AM
n180tf n180tf is offline
 
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Quote:
The interior still needs to be furred out with stud walls in order to run electrical and plumbing....
This is incorrect. There are furring strips imbedded in modern ICFs. You route wire and plumbing chases in the foam, mount the boxes, etc. Then put sheetrock or whatever right against the foam surfaces and secure with drywall screws.
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  #30  
Old 01-31-2016, 05:48 PM
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hydroguy2 hydroguy2 is offline
 
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Hey Mike, can't help with ICF building, although we almost used them for the foundation on our log home. The cost looked lower...if we did the labor. time was a factor for us to do the labor, so I went conventional concrete walls.

On the hangar cost for SIPS panels was a factor for our low budget allowance. Great product just too spendy for us. We are downsizing for our retirement so many decisions were $$ based. Didn't want to spend all our savings or have a huge loan...now it looks like I can retire this summer.

Our hangar is a 48x48x14 pole building with commercial girts. this allows me to sheet rock or tin the interior without any additional framing. we used spray foam 2" to give a tight, dry insulated building. Heating is radiant floor and will get a solar panel addition next year.

We also were told build as big a hangar as you can...you'll fill it! again our wallet said you only have 1 airplane and only need room for 1 more plus toys.
we have a studio apt 12x28 for guests in one corner. Big enough for friends to spend the week, small enough they probably wont. Garage door in the back for jeep, boat or what ever access.
I went with a 12x44 Higher Power Door HPDOORS the beauty is the clear opening of 11'6 or so in a 12' hole. Also the extra 4' width pays dividends when parking planes. I an easily get 3 RV's in our hangar even with the apartment hogging room in the corner. our actual hangar floor space is only 32'x46'+








It's been a lot of work being our own General Contractor and babysitting subs. but the commute isn't too bad some days. 4.5hrs to drive it each way or 1-1.5 in the RV. Great tailwind coming home a few days ago.


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