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  #1  
Old 08-31-2023, 09:27 AM
KEG KEG is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Tuscumbia, Alabama
Posts: 57
Default Priming Fiberglass Parts

The 12iS includes several parts manufactured from "FIBERGLASS-POLYESTER", "FIBERGLASS-EPOXY" and/or "E-EPOXY" per KAI sec.4. The difference in these materials is unknown to me.

My question is: What type primer to use on these parts until I can finish my project, fly it and, eventually, get the plane painted professionally? I would prefer a 'rattle can' product but I do have some spray equipment.
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First time builder
RV-12iS, Garmin IFR
Tuscumbia, Alabama
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  #2  
Old 08-31-2023, 09:38 AM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
Posts: 10,468
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KEG View Post
The 12iS includes several parts manufactured from "FIBERGLASS-POLYESTER", "FIBERGLASS-EPOXY" and/or "E-EPOXY" per KAI sec.4. The difference in these materials is unknown to me.

My question is: What type primer to use on these parts until I can finish my project, fly it and, eventually, get the plane painted professionally? I would prefer a 'rattle can' product but I do have some spray equipment.
Most, if not all fiberglass parts on the RV 12 are supplied with a gray gelcoat coating on the exterior. This doesnít require any primer prior to flying. The only fiberglass that will require some finish work prior to flying is the fiberglass work that is done during the build of the canopy. For that, any rattle can primer listed as high billed would be acceptable. Being high build will provide a surface good for finish sanding.
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Scott McDaniels
Hubbard, Oregon
Formerly of Van's Aircraft Engineering Prototype Shop
FAA/DAR & Pre-purchase inspection Services
A&P, EAA Technical Councelor
RV-6A (aka "Junkyard Special ")
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  #3  
Old 08-31-2023, 12:27 PM
FlyingDiver FlyingDiver is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Southwest Florida
Posts: 292
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rvbuilder2002 View Post
Most, if not all fiberglass parts on the RV 12 are supplied with a gray gelcoat coating on the exterior. This doesnít require any primer prior to flying. The only fiberglass that will require some finish work prior to flying is the fiberglass work that is done during the build of the canopy. For that, any rattle can primer listed as high billed would be acceptable. Being high build will provide a surface good for finish sanding.
Something like this? https://www.aircraftspruce.com/catal...clickkey=88826

I had to extend the edges of my cowl due to trimming them short, so I have exposed fiberglass in those areas. So I'd like to just do the whole cowl so it doesn't look quite so bad.
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2023 Donation Paid
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Empennage, Wings (except nav lights), Fuselage done
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  #4  
Old 08-31-2023, 12:42 PM
Carl Froehlich's Avatar
Carl Froehlich Carl Froehlich is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Dogwood Airpark (VA42)
Posts: 4,438
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Donít forget the inside of the cowl. Prime to seal it from oil and such. Any good two part epoxy primer works, and if the primer is not white then put a top coat of rattle can white on top to reflect heat.

Carl
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  #5  
Old 08-31-2023, 01:08 PM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
Posts: 10,468
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Froehlich View Post
Donít forget the inside of the cowl. Prime to seal it from oil and such. Any good two part epoxy primer works, and if the primer is not white then put a top coat of rattle can white on top to reflect heat.

Carl
Not so much necessary on an RV-12 cowl because they are manufactured using a wet layup process with regular expoxy resin (not prepreg).
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Opinions, information, and comments, are my own unless stated otherwise.
You are personally responsible for determining the suitability of any tips, ideas, etc. obtained from any post I have made in this forum.


Scott McDaniels
Hubbard, Oregon
Formerly of Van's Aircraft Engineering Prototype Shop
FAA/DAR & Pre-purchase inspection Services
A&P, EAA Technical Councelor
RV-6A (aka "Junkyard Special ")
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  #6  
Old 08-31-2023, 01:09 PM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
Posts: 10,468
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingDiver View Post
Something like this? https://www.aircraftspruce.com/catal...clickkey=88826

I had to extend the edges of my cowl due to trimming them short, so I have exposed fiberglass in those areas. So I'd like to just do the whole cowl so it doesn't look quite so bad.
I like the SEM products.
Should be a good choice, though I haven't ever used that specific one.
__________________
Opinions, information, and comments, are my own unless stated otherwise.
You are personally responsible for determining the suitability of any tips, ideas, etc. obtained from any post I have made in this forum.


Scott McDaniels
Hubbard, Oregon
Formerly of Van's Aircraft Engineering Prototype Shop
FAA/DAR & Pre-purchase inspection Services
A&P, EAA Technical Councelor
RV-6A (aka "Junkyard Special ")
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