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  #1  
Old 02-12-2020, 08:29 AM
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Felix1973 Felix1973 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Miami
Posts: 15
Exclamation Engine failure RV-12

Hello fellow RV-12 pilots:

Yesterday I had an engine failure right after takeoff. I turned around, declared emergency and landed her safely. It was pretty scary though.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1yj...J0NIHiLoh4B4FQ

This happened at 300ft and all engine instruments were in green. I did do pre-flight and run-up and had no prior indication for that. Ambient temperature was 82 degrees with 70% humidity. I am running 93 auto-gas.

I uploaded a short video of that incident I would like to get your feedback, maybe anyone can determine from sound of the engine what kind of failure this may have been?

Thanks
Felix
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  #2  
Old 02-12-2020, 08:39 AM
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Sam Buchanan Sam Buchanan is offline
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Did the engine run normally after landing (and catching your breath?). If so, could you do a full-power run-up?

Fuel starvation/flooding (vapor lock due to winter blend gas or flooding due to a defective carb float?) is a likely suspect. Other than a bit of hesitation in turning back.....well done!

But anything we suggest is secondary to a thorough visual and operational inspection of the engine and data from the engine monitor.
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Last edited by Sam Buchanan : 02-12-2020 at 08:48 AM.
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  #3  
Old 02-12-2020, 08:47 AM
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Felix1973 Felix1973 is offline
 
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Thanks for your feedback Sam. Yes, the engine ran fine after landing and no, I did not yet do a full-power run-up after yesterday's incident.

I had 16 gallons fuel in the tank and was climbing at Vy (75kts). Any idea what might have starved the engine from fuel in that situation?
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  #4  
Old 02-12-2020, 08:54 AM
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Sam Buchanan Sam Buchanan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Felix1973 View Post
Thanks for your feedback Sam. Yes, the engine ran fine after landing and no, I did not yet do a full-power run-up after yesterday's incident.

I had 16 gallons fuel in the tank and was climbing at Vy (75kts). Any idea what might have starved the engine from fuel in that situation?
Anything I say is mere internet speculation but if the engine performed well before and after the incident one possibility is vapor lock due to winter blend auto gas on a warm day. I've had this happen with a Lycoming engine in the RV-6 but don't know if RV-12ers see this as a concern with the Rotax using winter Miami gas. Obviously any filters in the fuel system need a very careful examination.

Did you build this aircraft? If not, who maintains it for you? Do you have access to local Rotax experts or RV-12 pilots? What do they suggest after looking at your engine?

By the way....welcome to the VAF community....wish it was under better circumstances!
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Last edited by Sam Buchanan : 02-12-2020 at 09:01 AM.
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  #5  
Old 02-12-2020, 08:57 AM
Lexxan Lexxan is offline
 
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I don't know if it's appropriate in this situation but I have heard that https://www.savvyanalysis.com/home works well in looking at engine data and helping look for issues.
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  #6  
Old 02-12-2020, 09:39 AM
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charosenz charosenz is offline
 
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First,

Excellent flying!!!

My guess is fuel related.

While I have very low time flying, I do have considerable experience with engines. I would suggest you check all fuel filters, fittings.

I watched the video, it was hard to tell, but it seems like the engine continued to put out sporadic power almost till the end. Is that true.

On a secondary note, I would check all ignition wiring connections as well.

For us who are curious, it would be helpful to know some more details likeL
Engine Make Model,hours.
Fuel system details, Pumps, how many? Return lines?
Fuel, 100LL, Auto?
Time on the system flying.
Electrical. Mags? Dual? Aftermarket?

Please keep us posted.

Charlie
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  #7  
Old 02-12-2020, 09:42 AM
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Sam Buchanan Sam Buchanan is offline
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A question for RV-12 pilots....is carb ice a concern with the 912?

If so, 82*F @ 70% is prime conditions:

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Last edited by Sam Buchanan : 02-12-2020 at 09:46 AM.
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  #8  
Old 02-12-2020, 09:44 AM
Mitch757 Mitch757 is offline
 
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Location: Falmouth, MA
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A couple years ago I had the same thing happen after takeoff in my RV12. The engine was warm and I had just filled the fuel tank to the top of the filler neck.

The taxi out was short and takeoff was normal until about 500 feet when the rpm rolled back. I realized that I was high to land so I chopped the power and landed uneventfully in the opposite direction.

After landing, the engine ran perfectly with full power and no stumbling. I checked the carburetors and floats and all was fine. Fuel pressure normal.

The fuel used was Swift 94UL.

In this case possibly fueling to the top of the tube might have had something to reduce fuel venting. Or short taxi with warms fuel.

Mitch757
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  #9  
Old 02-12-2020, 09:55 AM
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Brantel Brantel is offline
 
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It sounds like the engine was making partial power or at least at times it was? Is that true? Hard to tell from video. Glad you made it back around. These occasional examples of people making the impossible turn possible could lure folks into trying to pull it off when it happens to them. The being said we as pilots need to try and learn the details of what made it possible so we can use that knowledge if it ever happens to us. We also have to realize that not all RV's are the same anymore. The 12 likely has a much different glide ratio than a RV6 and trying this same turn in the same situation could end much differently.

At this point it looks to me like the partial power helped make this turn possible. Would love to know what the situation was in reality.

Would also love to hear what your thoughts were. Looks like there was some hesitation at the beginning which is perfectly normal. What made you decide to turn back?

Engine failure early in the takeoff climb is one of my biggest fears in flying.
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  #10  
Old 02-12-2020, 10:17 AM
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bkervaski bkervaski is offline
 
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Whoa! Glad you're safe .. great job handling the situation!
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