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  #1  
Old 05-01-2019, 08:13 AM
jeffsvan jeffsvan is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: detroit, michigan
Posts: 178
Default Expected Life cycle on Lycoming O-320 E2D

Just trying to get the feel of a normal life of engine operation of Lycoming O-320 E2D.

Engine was overhauled in 1981 0-SMOH with not much else given but some simple logbook entries. I do not know if cylinders were new or overhauled at that time.

Engine now has 1,550 hours on it SMOH.

Cylinder #3 was replaced twice.
The first time it was replaced with a used but serviceable cylinder at 900 SMOH, and then at 1300 hours SMOH that used cylinder had low compression and was replaced again with a overhauled unit.

Cylinder #2 was repaired once due to a broken ring. (honed and new rings) at 1,300 SMOH

Cylinder #1 was just replaced due to low compression with overhauled unit. Crack found by the exhaust valve. exhaust valve guide worn.

Cylinder #4 (according to logbooks) appears to be original.

at that same time 1300 hours SMOH (year 2014) the cam and lifters were examined and found to be in mirror like condition. Two senior mechanics looked it over and said "just fix the cylinders and go fly it".

The reason I am asking is that I am aware of a few O-320's on the field that made 2,000 hours without any cylinders replaced. Perhaps the owners are not providing correct information?

I am trying to get a 'feel' for what is normal and what is not on these engines. And considering how long ago mine was originally overhauled (1981) perhaps I am lucky to even go this long before needing a complete overhaul?

Opinions??
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  #2  
Old 05-01-2019, 08:26 AM
titanhank titanhank is offline
 
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Location: Friendswood, Tx
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If the oil pressure is good, compression good and it is not making metal in the filter, i would fly it. I have seen a lot of 0-320’s way over official tbo hours that when torn down look great. The key is to fly it and not let it sit around. Flight school engines rarely have serious issues. Engines flown 20hrs per year have a tendency to have rust in the bores and spall lifters from lack of use. I just finished my engine overhaul due to lack of use. Plane sat for years with very little flying. I bought it and started flying 70hrs per year. The engine lasted 100hrs after being put “back in regular” service before the lifters were trash. Cost me $20k for the overhaul, but i did a lot of things that was expensive to get the 190+hp out of it.
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  #3  
Old 05-01-2019, 08:49 AM
swjohnsey swjohnsey is online now
 
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I've got an O-320 in '67 Citabria. 2,165 hrs and never been touched. Still has above 70 on all cylinders and oil pressure above 60. Recently started using oil, maybe from front main seal.
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  #4  
Old 05-01-2019, 09:11 AM
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Jpm757 Jpm757 is offline
 
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Keep in mind that your 1550 hr engine was overhauled 38 years ago! That's a long time, (3X recommended calendar overhaul), and including a checkered history of cylinder replacement/repair. If you want a reliable engine you can count on, and can afford it, I would go for a quality overhaul. But once that's done it needs to be flown, regularly and often. Lycoming SB1009 allows for a 200 hr tbo extension for engines that meet a minimum use schedule. There is a reason for this, THESE ENGINES NEED TO BE FLOWN. If you are a 50 hr/year flyer then don't bother, just keep replacing cylinders or whatever else needs to be done on condition.
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  #5  
Old 05-01-2019, 10:47 AM
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donaziza donaziza is offline
 
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Hey Guys above, How often is good to keep your engine good, as referenced above? I fly about twice a month or maybe every two weeks or so. Is that good??
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  #6  
Old 05-01-2019, 11:57 AM
titanhank titanhank is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donaziza View Post
Hey Guys above, How often is good to keep your engine good, as referenced above? I fly about twice a month or maybe every two weeks or so. Is that good??
Most private owners will fly 30-50 hrs per year. I think this is about minimum for a healty engine longterm. The engine needs to get up to temperature to boil off water and contaminates once a week. This is not always possible. Lycoming recommends oil changes every 4 months or 25hrs with screen and 50hrs with filter for the same reasons. I run a filter and change the oil every 25 hrs regardless of time. It normally works out to two oil changed per year. Flying the engine and storage in a dry hangar will save you money in the long term.
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  #7  
Old 05-01-2019, 12:19 PM
elev666 elev666 is offline
 
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I know of schools who have put twice the recommended TBO hours on an E2D engine, the one in my RV 6 had 2600 hours on a 30 year old Skyhawk engine when I removed it for overhaul, A lot of people say the E2D was the best engine Lycoming ever built !! I?m only flying it 70 hrs / year now so it?s got a lifetime of flying in it I hope !!
By the way, I rebuilt the original cylinders so they are nearing 3000 hrs TT.
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  #8  
Old 05-01-2019, 12:41 PM
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Dan 57 Dan 57 is offline
 
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it ain?t the total amount of hours flown a year that counts, but the regularity (same as with pilot proficiency )
Engine manufacturers recommend a once a week flight, at least 30? duration, as a minimum. This will, amongst other positive effects, reoil all critical parts and eliminate some of the internal moisture.
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  #9  
Old 05-01-2019, 01:14 PM
YellowJacket RV9 YellowJacket RV9 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeeCee 57 View Post
it ain’t the total amount of hours flown a year that counts, but the regularity (same as with pilot proficiency )
Engine manufacturers recommend a once a week flight, at least 30’ duration, as a minimum. This will, amongst other positive effects, reoil all critical parts and eliminate some of the internal moisture.
Yep, like I tell my wife, the engine is an expensive investment, and the fiscally responsible thing for me to do is fly it at least once a week.

FWIW I have an -E3D with about 1200 SMOH and 200 STOH that has been flawless. The new cylinders were when I purchased the engine - due to the ECI recall (they didn't have any issues). I change the oil every 3 months no matter what and fly almost every week. Oil analysis is always excellent.

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  #10  
Old 05-01-2019, 08:36 PM
Boyd Birchler Boyd Birchler is offline
 
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I've had a few friend that flew Cherokee's with that engine and did so for 3000 hours. A couple of mechanic friends had a Cherokee 140 with 2700 hours that went 40 hours on a quart of oil. They figured they had went so far over TBO that it was time for a major. They majored it and it never got over 12 hours per quart.
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