VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

-POSTING RULES
-Advertise in here!
- Today's Posts | Insert Pics

Keep VAF Going
Donate methods

Point your
camera app here
to donate fast.


Go Back   VAF Forums > Main > RV General Discussion/News
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-01-2019, 01:15 PM
Dugaru's Avatar
Dugaru Dugaru is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Richmond VA, USA
Posts: 595
Default That time of year: improving cabin heat

I've had some modest success improving the cabin warmth of my RV-9A, and I owe it all to the various posts here. So I thought I would list what I've done, in the hope that some other freezing RVer might find this info useful in the future.

1. Sealed up the eyeball vents. I was getting a ton of wind through my plastic eyeball vents, even when they were "closed." Two vinyl caps, suggested by someone here on the forums, were a quick solution and a huge win in the "bang for the buck" category:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I'm sure someday I'll bite the bullet and get decent aluminum eyeball vents, but for now, these worked wonders.

2. Wrapped the exhaust muff. I got some exhaust wrap from the aviation department of Autozone and wrapped it around my heat muff. My hangar neighbor A&P signed off on this approach, while cautioning that it's important not to wrap the actual exhaust pipes. I also stuffed a copper scouring pad into the muff to give the air some more hot metal to flow around before entering the cabin (another suggestion I picked up here). The improvement from these changes was noticeable.

3. Heated clothing. There's a lot to be said for solving this problem with clothing, since it's bound to be cold getting in and out of the airplane as well.

I got a battery-heated vest for my intrepid copilot, and she raved about it so much that I got one as well. This is one of those rare "yeah right" gadgets that actually turns out to be super useful in real life:

https://www.ventureheat.com/130-heat...t-for-men.html

Prices appear to have gone up since I got ours, so you may want to hunt for an equivalent by another brand. I'm guessing there's all sorts of heated clothing pitched at motorcycle folks.

4. Hideous hat. The reason Elmer Fudd wears an Elmer Fudd hat is because those things are..... AWESOME.

https://www.duluthtrading.com/mens-l...SABEgJVXPD_BwE

I use in-ear Halos for my headset, so I can fold down the ear flaps on a Fudd hat and be super comfy while flying. The long bill on this one is a big plus under an RV canopy, especially because you'll likely be stowing the overhead shade in order to soak up sun.

I got a 2XL and amazingly it was just on the verge of being too large (my head is so huge, I don't have a forehead, I have an eighthead....)

Key thing to keep in mind: nobody can see your fashion up there. Just remember to take the Fudd hat off before landing or crashing, so that you aren't caught alive or dead wearing it.

My next projects:

1. Tackling the gale blowing up from the stick well.

2. Sealing the rear of the canopy. I'm still getting a bracing little breeze hitting the back of my head. Starting to think about how I can do this cheaply and easily, and in a way that might be removable during the summer, when having the breeze might be nice.
__________________
N929JA, 2007 RV-9A
Based W96: New Kent International Aerodrome
(near Richmond, VA USA)
2021 Dues Paid
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-01-2019, 03:20 PM
JohnInReno's Avatar
JohnInReno JohnInReno is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Prescott Valley/Chandler AZ
Posts: 352
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dugaru View Post
My next projects:

1. Tackling the gale blowing up from the stick well.

2. Sealing the rear of the canopy. I'm still getting a bracing little breeze hitting the back of my head. Starting to think about how I can do this cheaply and easily, and in a way that might be removable during the summer, when having the breeze might be nice.
1. Seal the aileron tubes with something like a sleeve from a wind-breaker jacket.

2. If your -9A is a slider, then you want to stop the air from going OUT by your elbow. That is what draws the air in from the back.
__________________
John Morgensen
RV-9A N946PM 600+ hours since 2013
Nevada/Arizona

Last edited by JohnInReno : 03-01-2019 at 03:22 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-01-2019, 03:23 PM
maniago's Avatar
maniago maniago is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Bowie MD
Posts: 890
Default

"8 head" - now thats funny!

Thanks for the suggestions. I was thinking about going with heated seat pads - 12v cigarette lighter style, so I put two of those receptacles in my plane (one for each seat) and a 15a breaker.....hadnt even thought about heated (motorcycle) clothing, but thats a great idea. Probably too late for you, but I have a slider vent in the tail of my canopy, cheap bowden cable operated. Plagiarized the idea from another owner....lol
__________________
Mani
Busby MustangII (FoldingWing) Pending DAR.
Don't be a hater; I'm a cousin with thin wings!
N251Y
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-01-2019, 03:30 PM
BillL BillL is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Central IL
Posts: 6,314
Default

You can reduce the heater flow by adding a restrictor to about 1" dia. at the firewall baffle.

Use the search function and find some posts by Alex Peterson, he had a comprehensive list of improvements. Make your search range back 10 yr ago.
__________________
Bill

RV-7
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-01-2019, 04:28 PM
rvbuilder2002's Avatar
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
Posts: 9,654
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dugaru View Post

My next projects:

1. Tackling the gale blowing up from the stick well.

2. Sealing the rear of the canopy. I'm still getting a bracing little breeze hitting the back of my head. Starting to think about how I can do this cheaply and easily, and in a way that might be removable during the summer, when having the breeze might be nice.
These two will have the biggest influence on improving your heater performance.

If much cold air is coming in, it will overwhelm even the best performing heat muff.
__________________
Opinions, information and comments are my own unless stated otherwise. They do not necessarily represent the direction/opinions of my employer.

Scott McDaniels
Hubbard, Oregon
Van's Aircraft Engineering Prototype Shop Manager
FAA/DAR
RV-6A (aka "Junkyard Special ")
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-01-2019, 08:07 PM
alcladrv alcladrv is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Southeast
Posts: 632
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dugaru View Post

My next projects:

1. Tackling the gale blowing up from the stick well.

2. Sealing the rear of the canopy. I'm still getting a bracing little breeze hitting the back of my head. Starting to think about how I can do this cheaply and easily, and in a way that might be removable during the summer, when having the breeze might be nice.
1. For sealing around the aileron push tubes, I followed an idea I either saw here or on a builder's website which worked very well. I bought a tyvek paint suit and cut off a portion of each sleeve. Disconnected the push tube, slipped the sleeve over the push tube, reconnected the push tube to the stick, tie-wrapped one end of the sleeve to the push tube, made an aluminum ring to match the opening in the lower fuselage for the push tube, and secured the sleeve between ring and the fuselage wall with screws. Make sure the sleeve is long enough so it will flex left and right as the stick moves.

2. For the back of the canopy on my slider, I've tried a couple of thin weatherstripping products that worked well on the curving sides of the fuselage. One had a kind of D profile with self-stick tape which is attached to the fuselage that reduces the backdraft quite a bit. I haven't solved the draft from the doghouse area, yet.

Overall, those mods warmed it up quite a bit, just using one heat muff, especially with no more cold draft between my legs.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-01-2019, 08:59 PM
RWoodard's Avatar
RWoodard RWoodard is online now
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Brighton, Colorado
Posts: 475
Default

I installed a seat bottom and seat back heater in my RV3. I bought the set from Flyboy Accessories. I can?t believe how well it works. It has a two position switch and I find myself switching to the low setting by the time I?m finished with my run up.

I noticed today that I still have a fair bit of air leaking around the stick boot. I?ll probably solve that with some foam and a zip tie.

I also have a pretty decent sized gap on the aft end of my slider canopy. I?ll probably solve this with some weather channel from the Home Depot aviation aisle. I?ll probably remove it in the summer because airflow is welcome in warm temps.
__________________
Rod Woodard
Brighton, Colorado (CO12)
RV-3 IO-320
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-01-2019, 10:10 PM
RepmikeBrown RepmikeBrown is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Tahlequah , Ok
Posts: 175
Default Flap rod cover

My grandson 3Dprinted me a set of these to keep the cold air from entering the flap rod holes in the fuselage. They work great at keeping air from coming in. I did have to glue a small leather flap on the top side with a slit in it for the rod [https://www.dropbox.com/s/35fyfsm562...20PM.jpg?dl=0], [https://www.dropbox.com/s/s3gt6v4mqb...20PM.jpg?dl=0]
__________________
RV4 Built/flying
repmikebrown@yahoo.com
Mike Brown
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-01-2019, 10:25 PM
rocketbob's Avatar
rocketbob rocketbob is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: 8I3
Posts: 3,758
Default

These are all solutions that incrementally help but the better solution would be recirculating heat fed with a centrifugal blower, like your car, with the ability to mix in some fresh air to keep humidity in check. Also heat muffs used on RVs are generally too small to work effectively. I fly a Beech Musketeer occasionally and it has plenty of heat at -10F. It has a large heat exchanger.
__________________

Please don't PM me! Email only!

Bob Japundza CFI A&PIA
N9187P PA-24-260B Comanche, flying
N678X F1 Rocket, under const.
N244BJ RV-6 "victim of SNF tornado" 1200+ hrs, rebuilding
N8155F C150 flying
N7925P PA-24-250 Comanche, restoring
Not a thing I own is stock.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-02-2019, 03:28 AM
RWoodard's Avatar
RWoodard RWoodard is online now
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Brighton, Colorado
Posts: 475
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rocketbob View Post
These are all solutions that incrementally help but the better solution would be recirculating heat fed with a centrifugal blower, like your car, with the ability to mix in some fresh air to keep humidity in check. Also heat muffs used on RVs are generally too small to work effectively. I fly a Beech Musketeer occasionally and it has plenty of heat at -10F. It has a large heat exchanger.
If my cowling was the size of a Beech Musketeer cowling, I?d probably have room for a larger heat muff and a more extensive air recirculation system.

It?s kinda like saying ?If I was taller, I wouldn?t be so overweight.?

__________________
Rod Woodard
Brighton, Colorado (CO12)
RV-3 IO-320
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:19 PM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.