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  #1  
Old 06-13-2016, 05:41 PM
NorthernRV4's Avatar
NorthernRV4 NorthernRV4 is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Prince Edward Island, Canada
Posts: 143
Default Aileron bellcrank rib

I'm wondering how other builders have dealt with this problem. Two of the rivets that attach the 3/4 angle are located right on the flanged ring around the second lightening hole. This is as per the plans but this leaves a gap between the angle and the rib web. Unfortunately I didn't notice this until I had started riveting.


Port aileron bellcrank rib by James Soutar, on Flickr

Port aileron bellcrank rib by James Soutar, on Flickr



I'd like to flatten this area to the angle with a pair of flat sets and my squeezer by I don't think it will lay tightly to the angle. I'd rather not have to drill out the rivets to disassemble it. Any suggestions?
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  #2  
Old 06-13-2016, 06:04 PM
HFS HFS is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Lemoore, CA
Posts: 384
Default Aileron Bellcrank Rib

Van's original plan was just to rivet through the lightening hole reinforcement and take whatever the result was.

I backfilled the affected areas with Devcon "Liquid Aluminum" or 3M 2216 Scotchweld w/aluminum powder as a thickening agent. After the proper curing interval, I riveted the joint as indicated. Three airplanes, and 2500 hours later - no problems.

David Howe
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  #3  
Old 06-13-2016, 07:23 PM
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az_gila az_gila is offline
 
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Location: 57AZ - NW Tucson area
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Exclamation

Be careful of that bolt shown on the right of your plans picture.

By the time you add in the thin, small diameter washers now called out for that location the bolt end can hit the angle if the tolerances stack up the wrong way.

Check you have a reasonable clearance here when the control rod to the stick is installed - contact, especially under G loads, would be a major control limiter and disaster.
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Last edited by az_gila : 06-14-2016 at 09:21 AM.
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  #4  
Old 06-14-2016, 05:51 AM
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NorthernRV4 NorthernRV4 is offline
 
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HFS View Post
Van's original plan was just to rivet through the lightening hole reinforcement and take whatever the result was.

I backfilled the affected areas with Devcon "Liquid Aluminum" or 3M 2216 Scotchweld w/aluminum powder as a thickening agent. After the proper curing interval, I riveted the joint as indicated. Three airplanes, and 2500 hours later - no problems.

David Howe
I'm surprised at that when so many other seemingly small details are fussed over. Being that this is an important structural part to the control system I want to make sure it's the best it can be. I think I'll try and make some conformal shims to fill in the gap. On a related note I was surprised there was not a second 3/4x.063 angle at the other end near the main spar. I considered that for a while and then resolved myself to the fact there are many -4 and -6 flying with no issues.

Last edited by NorthernRV4 : 06-14-2016 at 06:15 AM.
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  #5  
Old 06-14-2016, 06:50 AM
HFS HFS is offline
 
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Location: Lemoore, CA
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Default Aileron Bellcrank Rib

You have to remember the time frame for the design/construction of the prototype of this aircraft - it was finished in August of 1979. Van was more interested in simple construction techniques that could be used by most builders - back then there were very few "repeat" builders, so the cumulative skill set was not been developed as well as it is now.

You are building a dinosaur in comparison to the kits available today - almost all of the decisions concerning the health and well being of the construction is up to you. You build the jigs, locate all holes, deal with the inconsistencies of the plans, interpret the plans (as best you can), and all the other things that go along with these early models - early -6's are a lot the same re/building issues.

As John Harmon used to say, "Read the manual, throw it away, build the airplane".


HFS
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  #6  
Old 06-14-2016, 07:38 AM
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swisseagle swisseagle is offline
 
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Location: 20km outside of Zurich, Switzerland
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Default Are there three rivets on each horizontal angle?

Hello,

Just looked at the plans in your photo ... are there three rivets in the horizontal angle? One inbetween those which have a clecos inside?

Regards, Dominik
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  #7  
Old 06-14-2016, 12:32 PM
Christopher Murphy Christopher Murphy is offline
 
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Location: colorado
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Default Rivet it flat

Rivet it flat and make sure it dosent interfere. The integrity of the ring is transfered to the angle. Dont fool with a shim. Meaningless there.
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  #8  
Old 06-17-2016, 06:01 AM
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NorthernRV4 NorthernRV4 is offline
 
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Location: Prince Edward Island, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swisseagle View Post
Hello,

Just looked at the plans in your photo ... are there three rivets in the horizontal angle? One inbetween those which have a clecos inside?

Regards, Dominik
There are four rivets in the horizontal angle, two at one end, and two slightly further spaced at the other end. The aft most rivets attach to the vertical angle and the rib and are the ones drilled through the embossed ring.

Aileron bellcrank rib by James Soutar, on Flickr

DWG-16a by James Soutar, on Flickr

Port aileron bellcrank rib by James Soutar, on Flickr
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  #9  
Old 06-17-2016, 04:27 PM
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Bob Kuykendall Bob Kuykendall is offline
 
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Location: Vallecito, CA
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Default

I'd suggest adjusting the embossed ring using the percussive inertial tuning implement sometimes referred to as a "hammer."
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  #10  
Old 06-17-2016, 04:43 PM
krw5927 krw5927 is offline
 
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Location: Wichita, KS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernRV4 View Post
There are four rivets in the horizontal angle, two at one end, and two slightly further spaced at the other end. The aft most rivets attach to the vertical angle and the rib and are the ones drilled through the embossed ring.
What about these two?

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