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  #1  
Old 12-21-2014, 05:45 PM
ShortSnorter ShortSnorter is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: NOLA
Posts: 351
Default Build on or replace?

Good Evening All - I'll cut to the chase.

I smeared the head of a 470AD4-7 on the VS-411PP (hinge bracket). I drilled the head and popped it out with a punch but could not for the life of me get the tail/shank out. I slowly drilled with a #40 bit a little at a time and trying to push it out after drilling a bit. I finally drilled through the rivet and ended up knocking/prying the shop head off with flush dykes. When the remnants of the rivet were finally removed, the shop head side of the hole seems to have a slight "countersink" appearance. The hole itself was not enlarged or mishaped from drilling. My question is: Can I replace with the same rivet? Replace with a slightly longer rivet to fill the slightly swollen hole? Start over? Below are some pictures of the empty hole and with a new rivet inserted. Thanks for all the help!

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  #2  
Old 12-21-2014, 06:25 PM
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Jesse Jesse is offline
 
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Location: X35 - Ocala, FL
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Put the same size in or a half size longer.
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  #3  
Old 12-21-2014, 09:32 PM
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rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
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Location: Hubbard Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse View Post
Put the same size in or a half size longer.
I agree.
Same size will probably produce just a slightly thinner shop head but should still meet minimum spec.
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  #4  
Old 12-21-2014, 11:23 PM
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az_gila az_gila is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse View Post
Put the same size in or a half size longer.
AD4 (1/8) rivets don't come in half sizes do they?

Use the next size up...
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  #5  
Old 12-22-2014, 12:22 AM
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rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by az_gila View Post
AD4 (1/8) rivets don't come in half sizes do they?

Use the next size up...
No, that is what rivet cutters are for.....
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  #6  
Old 12-22-2014, 05:59 AM
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AltonD AltonD is offline
 
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Whenever, wherever possible, use a hand squeezer. When you first start building, the hands are pretty weak. By the time you finish, you will not even think about squeezing a AD4 rivet.
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  #7  
Old 12-22-2014, 06:16 AM
ShortSnorter ShortSnorter is offline
 
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Default Thanks

Thanks for input, I figured that would be the consensus but just wanted to verify.
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  #8  
Old 12-22-2014, 06:38 AM
Tom Martin Tom Martin is offline
 
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Location: Ontario, Canada
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For a part like this it is hard to beat the old C frame for setting a rivet. Support the spar with blocks etc to get it level and then using a hammer set the rivet. The beauty of using a hammer is that you can start with one small hit, take a look at the rivet, adjust, hit again, adjust etc, until you have the perfect shop head.
I use a hammer to back rivet many parts on the airplane, the firewall of the RV14 is a good example of where back riveting using a simple hammer works really well. Yes it is slower then using the rivet gun with a back rivet set but if you have to drill out a few missed rivets the time advantage is gone. In this case I do it free hand, using only the "set' from the C frame and not the frame itself.
Do not get me wrong, I do not use a hammer to set that many rivets on the airplane but sometimes it makes sense, and this may be one of those cases.
As always, practice on some scraps first.
There is a certain amount of pleasure in hand setting a rivet, and actually watching the shop head develop.
It is not that often that you can hit an airplane with a hammer, if feels good!
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Last edited by Tom Martin : 12-22-2014 at 06:42 AM.
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  #9  
Old 12-23-2014, 06:57 AM
ShortSnorter ShortSnorter is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Martin View Post
For a part like this it is hard to beat the old C frame for setting a rivet. Support the spar with blocks etc to get it level and then using a hammer set the rivet. The beauty of using a hammer is that you can start with one small hit, take a look at the rivet, adjust, hit again, adjust etc, until you have the perfect shop head.
I use a hammer to back rivet many parts on the airplane, the firewall of the RV14 is a good example of where back riveting using a simple hammer works really well. Yes it is slower then using the rivet gun with a back rivet set but if you have to drill out a few missed rivets the time advantage is gone. In this case I do it free hand, using only the "set' from the C frame and not the frame itself.
Do not get me wrong, I do not use a hammer to set that many rivets on the airplane but sometimes it makes sense, and this may be one of those cases.
As always, practice on some scraps first.
There is a certain amount of pleasure in hand setting a rivet, and actually watching the shop head develop.
It is not that often that you can hit an airplane with a hammer, if feels good!
Thanks Tom, I'll give the C Frame a shot!
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  #10  
Old 12-23-2014, 11:11 AM
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JonJay JonJay is offline
 
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I drove all my main wing spar rivets with a C-frame. 1/8" rivets will set like butta'
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