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  #1  
Old 08-02-2016, 07:42 PM
Paul 5r4 Paul 5r4 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Foley, Al
Posts: 595
Default IFR training question

Recently I saw a video of a VFR guy stuck on top of a pretty benign looking cloud layer. He was handling it well and ATC was looking for a hole. So... I've been considering getting some IFR training. I'm not really interested in the rating but would like to become a little more.... really less.... afraid of an inadvertent cloud encounter. I have 1300 hrs and all of it VFR with very little hood time. If I ever HAD to to stay alive, I would like to become halfway proficient at handling an encounter with clouds.
My 7A is not IFR equipped/certified and doesn't have a heated pitot. With a VFR airplane can I get some actual instrument time with an instructor or am I limited to hood time only? Wondering what my options might be.

Thanks in advance!

EDITED here. Ok.... I understand the thoughts of the posts below, (and for the most part agree), however please answer the question.... can you get actual instrument time in a VFR airplane or would I maybe be forced to rent something.
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Last edited by Paul 5r4 : 08-02-2016 at 08:44 PM.
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  #2  
Old 08-02-2016, 07:59 PM
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scard scard is offline
 
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Location: Cedar Park, TX
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Default

This concept makes any instrument rated pilot nervous to say the least. "Let's train to a level to where we're just comfortable enough to ...." Sorry, not what you wanted to hear, but what you're going to get.

"Heated pitot" isn't a requirement. Saddle up and get the rating. It is so completely worth it.

I've talked to so many VFR only pilots that just can't comprehend just how EASY full IFR competency can make things. Yeah, none of us are flying around thunder storms or icing, but short of that, IFR = Easy button. Quite quickly the conversation always degenerates to single engine vs. multi...
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Last edited by scard : 08-02-2016 at 08:25 PM.
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  #3  
Old 08-02-2016, 08:11 PM
cardinalflier cardinalflier is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Granite Bay, Ca
Posts: 131
Default

A little bit of IFR training can lead to a false confidence. Staying proficient at IFR flying takes consistent practice under the hood, or in actual IMC. It can be very difficult to stay upright in IMC if you aren't current and practicing on a regular basis. The lack of a heated pitot/static is the least of your issues. Anything less than 100% currency, which should lead to proficiency, is extremely risky. My opinion
Bruce Estes
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  #4  
Old 08-02-2016, 08:35 PM
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Planecrazy232 Planecrazy232 is offline
 
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Location: Cape Coral, FL
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Default

I was a VFR pilot for the last 28 years. I thought "why would I need a license to kill?" Well last year I worked hard and received my IFR rating. It was said before- it makes flights like pushing the "easy button". I can honestly say I fly much more VFR these days than ever before because of the rating. I feel safer because I know I am safer. I have very high personal minimums that I will never break. The controllers do a fantastic job with IFR traffic. If you're going to do it- go all the way.
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  #5  
Old 08-02-2016, 08:46 PM
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ChiefPilot ChiefPilot is offline
 
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Location: Twin Cities, MN
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What everyone else said.

I was recently on a flight that, had I been able to file IFR like normal, would have been a piece of cake. Instead we needed to go VFR and it turned into a bucket of armpits. Get the rating.
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  #6  
Old 08-02-2016, 11:19 PM
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SMRacer SMRacer is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Leesburg, VA
Posts: 580
Default The answer you wanted

No, you cannot legally fly into IMC conditions if the aircraft is not properly equipped and certified for it.

No, it is not necessary to get a full instrument rating. And single pilot IFR in an RV can be quite challenging.

Yes, you should frequently get some hood time in your airplane so that you could save yourself in an emergency. You could also get some actual IMC time by renting a properly certified airplane with the guidance of an instructor.

No, you should not use that IFR training to embolden yourself so that you fly into conditions that could include unintended flight from VMC to IMC.

I am by no means trying to talk you out of getting an instrument rating. Any additional training can only make you a better pilot.

Be smart, be safe.
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  #7  
Old 08-03-2016, 01:34 AM
BobTurner BobTurner is online now
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Livermore, CA
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What, exactly, do you mean by a vfr airplane?
If you have the usual operating limits they say you must equip per FAR 91.205 for ifr operations. Do you mean you do not have that equipment? If so you may not fly in IMC. If you do meet the bare minimums of 91.205 most cfiis will consider that not enough to be safe - they will want some backups for actual imc.
So tell me what is in the panel, and I'll tell you if I would fly in actual IMC with you.
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  #8  
Old 08-03-2016, 04:13 AM
Paul 5r4 Paul 5r4 is offline
 
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Location: Foley, Al
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Default instruments

I have the Dynon D-100 and D-120 as well as the Dynon autopilot. Also a standard ASI and Altimeter. No VOR or ILS capabilities.
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N729PG..... 450+ hrs
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  #9  
Old 08-03-2016, 06:35 AM
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Auburntsts Auburntsts is offline
 
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Location: Tampa, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul 5r4 View Post
I have the Dynon D-100 and D-120 as well as the Dynon autopilot. Also a standard ASI and Altimeter. No VOR or ILS capabilities.
As others have said, your OPLIMS and 91.205 drives the requirements. Plus you need to comply with the 91.411 for the static system inspection, and although technically not required by regs for IFR, for practical reasons you also need a transponder and meet 91.413 for its inspection. Additionally, you need the navigation equipment suitable for the route being flown. In practical terms, this means you need either Nav radio with a CDI (or EFIS HSI) or an IFR GPS (preferably a WAAS box, TSO145/146, or you'll still need a Nav radio to compliment the GPS).

Having said that, you could log simulated instrument time (e.g. under the hood) in a VFR airplane, but you'd have to fly in VFR conditions and you'd need either a safety pilot or CFI to ride shotgun.
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Last edited by Auburntsts : 08-03-2016 at 02:50 PM.
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  #10  
Old 08-03-2016, 01:40 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is online now
 
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Location: Livermore, CA
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As others have said, your airplane is not legal to fly in IMC without some sort of navigation ability. Beyond that, it appears you have no backups for attitude. While strictly speaking 91.205 does not require it, I will not fly in IMC where the failure of one box, one power source, or a bug in the pitot tube leaves prayer as the only option for a safe outcome.
By all means, get some hood time, either with a cfii (especially to start - you don't want to practice bad habits) and/or a safety pilot. A hood is semi-realistic in the day (shadows give you subtle clues) but quite realistic at night, if you can do that.
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