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  #21  
Old 12-23-2020, 08:49 AM
rv6ejguy's Avatar
rv6ejguy rv6ejguy is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Calgary, Canada
Posts: 5,933
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The 6A is a very easy airplane to fly and land. I use 70-75 kts, on final and prefer landing with half flap unless you need full flap for a short runway. Climb 85-110 knots depending on prop, OAT, temps and over the nose visibility.

Best glide 85-90 knots depending on prop.

Watch the sink rate below 65 knots with full flap.

Nose high in the flare, you never want to wheelbarrow a 6A as the nose gear doesn't take kindly to abuse.

That's it, have fun!
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Ross Farnham, Calgary, Alberta
Turbo Subaru EJ22, SDS EFI, Marcotte M-300, IVO, Shorai- RV6A C-GVZX flying from CYBW since 2003- 445.9 hrs. on the Hobbs,
RV10 95% built- Sold 2016
http://www.sdsefi.com/aircraft.html
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiy...g2GvQfelECCGoQ


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  #22  
Old 12-23-2020, 09:21 AM
Snowflake's Avatar
Snowflake Snowflake is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sidney, BC, Canada
Posts: 4,134
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Quote:
Originally Posted by azrv6 View Post
Should be able to click on each image to get larger size, hope this helps as a starting point for you.

Attachment 6041
Keep in mind the Vne speed here is incorrect. Vne is True Airspeed, not Indicated.
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Rob Prior
1996 RV-6 "Tweety" C-FRBP (formerly N196RV)
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  #23  
Old 12-23-2020, 11:22 AM
Robert Sailor Robert Sailor is online now
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Nanaimo BC Canada
Posts: 81
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Depending how much of your time is in light aircraft and how recent it is the RV6/6A is a very easy aircraft to fly.. The 6A is capable of shorter takeoffs and landings because its capable of higher angles of attack....in my opinion. Treat the nose gear like a taxi gear, within 2 seconds on takeoff you should have the nose gear off and hold it off on landing until you can't. It will operate just fine in gravel and grass but keep it away from rough strips. Approach speed for average use is best at 70 knots and for short strips 65 works fine with a tad of power. Stall speed on ours is 50 knots, kinda a nothing sandwich. Very well designed aircraft and very predictable. I taught aerobatics for years and its delightful for gentleman's inside maneuvers, again very predictable. Ours has the IO-320 with constant speed and we can count on right around 165 knots at 10,000 feet so it's a great cross country machine as well. Having owned over 30 aircraft in the last 50 years it certainly rates as one of my all time favorites.
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  #24  
Old 12-23-2020, 02:13 PM
quinnjim quinnjim is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Algonquin, IL
Posts: 21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Sailor View Post
Depending how much of your time is in light aircraft and how recent it is the RV6/6A is a very easy aircraft to fly.. The 6A is capable of shorter takeoffs and landings because its capable of higher angles of attack....in my opinion. Treat the nose gear like a taxi gear, within 2 seconds on takeoff you should have the nose gear off and hold it off on landing until you can't. It will operate just fine in gravel and grass but keep it away from rough strips. Approach speed for average use is best at 70 knots and for short strips 65 works fine with a tad of power. Stall speed on ours is 50 knots, kinda a nothing sandwich. Very well designed aircraft and very predictable. I taught aerobatics for years and its delightful for gentleman's inside maneuvers, again very predictable. Ours has the IO-320 with constant speed and we can count on right around 165 knots at 10,000 feet so it's a great cross country machine as well. Having owned over 30 aircraft in the last 50 years it certainly rates as one of my all time favorites.
Great information. Thanks for taking the time to post it.
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  #25  
Old 12-25-2020, 11:52 AM
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Mike Crossland Mike Crossland is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Midland Tx
Posts: 4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quinnjim View Post
Thanks.

Iíve been flying for over 30 years. ATP, CFII, 20,000+ hours.

There is always something new to learn when trying different aircraft. I thought some basic V speeds would be a good place to start. Iíve flown everything from a J-3 Cub to 767ís. If you fly the proper speeds, they all do OK.

I plan on getting together with an RV instructor for a few hours. Asking about relevant V speeds is NOT an indication of my lack of experience. Quite the opposite.

Itís kind of funny to ask a pretty basic question and have several guys suggest Iím inexperienced.
In my experience the guys with the least experience always give the most advice. With that said, you will love the RV, they are just fun to fly. Period.
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  #26  
Old 12-27-2020, 11:48 AM
BenderAviation BenderAviation is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: San Diego
Posts: 4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quinnjim View Post
Great information. Thanks for taking the time to post it.
Welcome to the club Jim. Are you purchasing the RV you posted about in the video?
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  #27  
Old 01-02-2021, 07:25 PM
delgadojay@gmail.com delgadojay@gmail.com is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Colorado
Posts: 50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Sailor View Post
Depending how much of your time is in light aircraft and how recent it is the RV6/6A is a very easy aircraft to fly.. The 6A is capable of shorter takeoffs and landings because its capable of higher angles of attack....in my opinion. Treat the nose gear like a taxi gear, within 2 seconds on takeoff you should have the nose gear off and hold it off on landing until you can't. It will operate just fine in gravel and grass but keep it away from rough strips. Approach speed for average use is best at 70 knots and for short strips 65 works fine with a tad of power. Stall speed on ours is 50 knots, kinda a nothing sandwich. Very well designed aircraft and very predictable. I taught aerobatics for years and its delightful for gentleman's inside maneuvers, again very predictable. Ours has the IO-320 with constant speed and we can count on right around 165 knots at 10,000 feet so it's a great cross country machine as well. Having owned over 30 aircraft in the last 50 years it certainly rates as one of my all time favorites.

I'll 2nd this one! Seems to vry a little with each reply I have read but this one seems to be the closest to my experience with the plane.

I bought my 6a around May and have put about 400+ hours on it with the vast majority being long cross countries, with lots of T&G at various airports around the country! Tail # is N99PZ flight aware will back it all up. lol...

Anyway- I have landed the RV in all configurations Flaps full/half/ and none. Grass strips, Dirt strips, rough strips (not at all advisable) short and long strips. I have bounced the **** out of it a couple of times (Nose gear doesn't like it) and now mostly do butter landings - of course.

I practice getting the nose off the ground 6" asap and keeping it there until I rotate. I don't climb out at low speeds, (while it can) I find climbing out at "blue line" (118knts) gives me the best "cooling" and 1000+' a min which is good enough for me. On landing; I practice stabilized approaches and being fully configured and stabilized on final as if doing an IFR approach. 80 knots (full flaps) and come across the # about 10 knots slower. I flair and keep the plane in ground effect about 8-10" off the run way until the mains touch down and then keep the nose off the ground until speed dictates.

When I 1st started I had an "Idea" of what the previous owner used for his numbers. However the 1st thing I did was go out and do power on and power off stalls and I quickly found out my plane stalls at 55knts and how she handles. Get in and do some stalls, then play and find out what #'s works best for your plane. Seems they all vary- either because of the flyer or the build. I also found lot's of information on "YouTube" and I'll admit I learned how to land and fly that plane using it. No transition training... (Yup- I said it and admit it.) lol... The plane is actually that easy to fly. I just have to laugh when others flamed you for asking about the #'s, because if you know those #'s this plane really isn't as complicated as "those" others tried to make it sound!

By the way; I have an O-360 w/ C/S prop.

Have fun! You'll love it! Feel free to stop in Colorado (and say Hi)on your way from SFO.

Last edited by delgadojay@gmail.com : 01-02-2021 at 07:29 PM.
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