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  #21  
Old 07-31-2020, 07:47 AM
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Vlad Vlad is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Utah
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scard View Post


Tanya is a day behind, but we woke up in Ogden UT this morning after a bumpy afternoon. Time to Fly!
If in the mood stop by 33U. Walk to my trailer and relax there. Beer in the fridge. Key in the cars (take Jetta) stay for couple days. I am out for AZ till Sunday
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Не имей сто рублей, а имей сто друзей.
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  #22  
Old 07-31-2020, 09:38 AM
douglassmt douglassmt is offline
 
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Or, stop by Missoula on your way home. We plan to be in the San Juans in a couple weeks, one of our favorite destinations. Let us know if you're planning to stop here as I will offer the brewery tour.
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  #23  
Old 07-31-2020, 10:15 AM
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MarkW MarkW is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Edgewater, FL. KSFB
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Hey Guys,
Funny thing is being a Texan in Florida for 48 years I know nothing about the San Juan Islands. So I googled the area to see what the area was like for sailing. Up pops a picture on google maps very similar to your school house picture.
https://www.google.com/maps/place/St...4d-123.2162139
Looks fun.
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RV9 - N14MW - Flying
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  #24  
Old 07-31-2020, 06:19 PM
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tcard tcard is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 312
Default Disembark Day

The sun rose on our final morning. It was departure day. The shore trips were completed and up came the anchor. Once again, the magenta line kept us clear of shore, and with almost no wind we motored home.



As we left Tranquility for the last time (at least for this trip, we hope to be back), it felt as if we just arrived four days ago. The time passed as if we had entered a time machine.

Tidying up after arriving back at the dock.



Bye Tranquility


We stopped at the grocery store to pick up some rations for dinner at the hotel and travel food the next day. Then it was back to the airport, which looked deserted compared to Sundayís arrival. Scott and I chatted a bit with an EMS worker that flies a Cessna 150, while Roy and Sandy visited with another couple that parked next to us. Remember the airport at the end of Prevost Bay with the parachute approaches (not the one that ended in the trees)? It is a private airport that requires an invite from a resident. Well, Roy and Sandy got their invite as that couple lives there. Itís amazing how great things happen when you are simply friendly to the folks around you.

Iím pretty sure that tears would have swelled my eyes as we said goodbye to our good friends if it werenít for the fact it was time to operate. There just wasnít time for that as the flights ahead required all of our focus.

Itís about 1600 nm from Austin to Orcas Island and requires at least two days of travel. The plan was to head towards either Boise or Salt Lake City, and see how we felt in the afternoon bumpies. The fuel stop in Pendleton, KPDT, was HOT! We were surprised to land in 104 degrees in Oregon. The bumps werenít too bad, nowhere near the teeth rattling sessions weíve endured before, so we pressed on to Ogden, UT.

Sandy packed us kids sandwiches with her homemade bread. They tasted great up at 12.5 and allowed us to keep moving.



We landed in Ogden at 7pm local for a well earned rest.



Our COVID-friendly dinner included some microwaveable sustenance and an in-room nightcap. It turned out way better than expected. The ramen noodle bowl may end up in the pantry at home.



Next up, the 1000 nautical mile run home. We have a dog to pick up, as well as headsets and RV E-Lifts that need to make their way into the world.
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  #25  
Old 07-31-2020, 09:17 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donaziza View Post
Is it cold there? I see Scott is wearing a jacket in the motorboat.
The temps were highs in the low 80s / upper 70s with lows in the 50s. The mornings warmed up quickly and it cooled down just as rapidly in the evenings. Being on big water, it wasn't very humid. The dinghy rides tended to be early morning or late evening, so the cooler parts of the day.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkW View Post
Hey Guys,
Funny thing is being a Texan in Florida for 48 years I know nothing about the San Juan Islands. So I googled the area to see what the area was like for sailing. Up pops a picture on google maps very similar to your school house picture.
https://www.google.com/maps/place/St...4d-123.2162139
Looks fun.
I didn't actually get a picture of the school house. The picture you found is Turn Point Lighthouse on the northwest point of Stuart Island. It was pretty amazing watching the water flow over the underwater terrain and plants. I need to do some research on the significance of the maker there.



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Last edited by tcard : 07-31-2020 at 09:32 PM.
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  #26  
Old 08-01-2020, 02:13 PM
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tcard tcard is offline
 
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Originally Posted by RV8JD View Post
Quite an interesting piece of history. Thanks for providing the impetus for me to look it up!
Carl, thanks for tracking down those details. For me, this is the fun way to learn history when it isn't all just from books.
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Last edited by tcard : 08-01-2020 at 02:55 PM.
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  #27  
Old 08-01-2020, 03:28 PM
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vlittle vlittle is offline
 
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Location: Victoria, Canada
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Here I am sitting at anchor on the Canadian side (called the Gulf Islands). The San Juanís on the US side are an extension of the same archipelago The UK lost the San Juan Islands to the Yanks in the Pig War of 1859.

The entire archipelago is considered some of the finest cruising waters in the eastern Pacific and the view from the air is also spectacular.

Unfortunately, my boating time is cutting into my flying time, so itís time to return to my home port. Now hockey will cut into my flying time too, sigh. Too many toys/hobbies/jobs/interests.

You know, an electric VTOL ultralight would fit on my top deck (the BlackFly), so there is hope yet. The range of the BlackFly would cover most of the islands.

V
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  #28  
Old 08-01-2020, 03:43 PM
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tcard tcard is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 312
Default Point the Nose Toward Home

Being exhausted is a tremendous sleep aid. My head hit the pillow a little after 10pm, and I’m not sure I moved until the alarm went off at 6. We are crossing desert and high terrain, a combination for rough air, so we try to get out of Dodge early. I was moving before Scott, so I ran for coffee and muffins to deliver to the other half and returned just as Scott was becoming consicous. And we weren't behind schedule...YET. So far as our hosts knew, it was still 5-something in the morning.

We packed our food rations for the day, grabbed a couple bagels from the hotel breakfast to supplement our grocery store purchases, and made our way back to Ogden-Hinckley and CB SkyShare. The FBO did great. There wasn't a lineman to park us, so we self-parked, but they didn't make us move the airplane. They sent us off with a courtesy car the night before that took 15 blades to get started and was sketchy, but we were happy to have it as it delivered us to the hotel and back. In the morning, we walked in, droped the keys, and paid the fuel bill as the airplane was already fueled. We each did our typical tasks and it was off to attack the day.

The controllers were great to work with, which is always especially nice when you’re unfamiliar with the field and airspace. The tower coordinated clearance through the adjacent military airspace, and we were off to the VFR transition down the I-15 freeway on the east side of Salt Lake City.

We flew by the Salt Lake County Flight Park. Their website says "Flight Park is an 80 acre area in Draper. The park is designated for hang gliding and paragliding use, where gliders can fly off the winds from the north side of the Point of the Mountain." It looked like a blast, but there were so many paragliders I would have certainly bumped canopies. I don't know if that is as bad as trading paint, but I'd really rather not experience either.

We climbed up and over some terrain and stayed clear of the higher terrain. A friend calls it cumulogranite, way less friendly than the ever-grumpy cumulonimbus.





The first stop was on a mesa in Aztec, NM. Here's a place that landing short or long could put a damper on the day. There wasn’t much there, but it had the basic necessities and turned into a 23 mintue stop from shutdown to startup.



There was a bush plane flying low and fast both in the pattern and immediate vicinity of the airport. Out here it is pretty easy to maintain 500 - 1000 - or even 5000 feet away from any person or structure. He saw us taxi out and let us know he'd be remaining clear during our departure. Perfect, that's all the info we needed. He said he was breaking in a cylinder, so the operation made sense with the altitude limiting performance and cooling. It was a very healthy sounding engine, and we enjoyed the low-level airshow.



Rations at 13K included tuna packets on the acquired bagels, with mayo and mustard stirred in, and bananas. Not only does lunch in the air save time on the ground, it also makes the time in the air go by faster. Win-win!



The next stop was at Lamesa, TX, which, conicidentally is NOT on a mesa like our previous stop. It was quite cooler than our stop in Oregon, which was a welcomed surprise. I do have to make a plug for Lamesa, KLUV, for VAF pilots. This fuel stop is just south of Lubbock, with superb fuel prices, a brand new terminal building that was sparkly clean with good wifi and a couch for a nap, courtesy car, and recently resurfaced runways. Unless you require an attended airport, this is a great place to add to your flight planning options. There was nobody there, but there were 3 numbers to call in foreflight (one more than on the airnav page) if you were to need assistance, and a courtesy car was available.

A not-so-subtle reminder of the times we are in...Hand sanitizer at the fuel pump


The last leg home into 40XS was relatively easy, even though the radar rertuns paint a completely opposing narrative. We had been watching the weather build since before our stop in Lamesa, and the reds and purples just kept grabbing more than their fair share of the color scheme. We chose to deviate to the north of the exciting colors and planned to turn due south into Breakaway once we passed them.







It's amazing just how accommodating ATC is when there is actual weather around. I think you could have asked them for a cup of coffee, and they would somehow have made it appear in the cockpit. There was one pilot on frequency that had been told his destination wasn't accepting traffic (towered airport). About 10 mintues later, the controller advised the field had just opened and the reply was 'thanks, you're awesome'. The controller advised us that we'd passed the cell with the extreme precipitation, and our eyeballs out the window agreed. I could easily have echoed the words of the previous pilot. We scooted in to Breakaway without a single drop of water hitting the canopy.

We hopped out of the plane and made a beeline to pick up Skylar. She bolted out of the boarding place, galloped to the car, and leapt in. Ah, yes, back to normal.

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Last edited by tcard : 08-02-2020 at 05:02 PM.
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  #29  
Old 08-01-2020, 03:58 PM
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scard scard is offline
 
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Many of these flights were on an IFR flight plan. I find it quite a bit easier when going long distances. Avoiding clouds becomes annoying and detracts from the more strategic thinking necessary when weather happens or in unfamiliar territory.
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  #30  
Old 08-02-2020, 09:10 AM
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AlexPeterson AlexPeterson is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcard View Post


Tanya - what make/model of tire is this? I haven't seen one like that.
Thanks -
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