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  #21  
Old 05-19-2022, 08:11 AM
rongawer rongawer is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Brentwood, CA
Posts: 937
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockwoodrv9 View Post
I am still a student pilot. I have about 40 hours solo and 15 or so instruction in my 9A. I am not a fan of bouncing around when I fly but here in Michigan calm days are rare.

I have limited my flying to less than 10 mph on the ground or a 5-7 knot cross wind. As it heats up here, the different types of land - trees, lakes, farm land, all cause thermals and some pretty bumpy rides.

It still freaks me out a bit when it starts getting bumpy. I have been trying to fly through it thinking I will get used to it. I am better but I do cut some of my flights short because I am not enjoying it.

Any suggestions on how to become more comfortable in the bumps or flying technique that will help?
I suspect that some of your anxiety about the bumps (and likely turbulence in general) comes from the unknown, such as "will this thing hold together?". If so, maybe seeing the affect the bumps have on the airplane will help. If you have access to a G meter, (the Garmin G3X will display one), you can watch the bumps happen, see the peak value and actually make a game of it.

Comfort in flying comes with experience, experience comes with knowledge, expanding your knowledge of the the airframe and the flight will give you eventually make you more comfortable, and maybe even make it more enjoyable. Bumps can be fun...

I've found bumps rarely exceed 1G (e.g. you're already at 1G in level flight, a heavy "bump" might pop the G meter to 1.8) and are well within any decent aircraft's capacity. Just pull the throttle back a little and keep it straight and level. No worries.
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Last edited by rongawer : 05-19-2022 at 08:15 AM.
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  #22  
Old 05-19-2022, 08:23 AM
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jneves jneves is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2021
Location: Livermore, CA
Posts: 203
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One more thing to add, if it's bumpy turn off your autopilot, hand fly and don't fight the bumps. This makes for a slightly better flight.
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  #23  
Old 05-19-2022, 08:56 AM
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RV6_flyer RV6_flyer is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: NC25
Posts: 3,947
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No one likes bumps or crosswinds. We sorta just accept it and deal with both.

As one gains experience, both will be tolerated more.

As one gets older, both will get tolerated less.

I am speaking from 40-years flying experience. I tolerate crosswinds and bumps less now than I did 9-years ago as I was about to start retirement.

Early mornings are typically the smoothest and least crosswinds in my experience. Higher altitudes typically are also smoother.

I was not able to land my RV-6 in 49-states without turbulence or crosswinds. Had to tolerate some. At my age now, I am not sure I still have the tolerance to repeat everything I have done with my RV-6.
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  #24  
Old 05-19-2022, 09:25 AM
rongawer rongawer is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Brentwood, CA
Posts: 937
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RV6_flyer View Post
No one likes bumps or crosswinds. We sorta just accept it and deal with both.

As one gains experience, both will be tolerated more.

As one gets older, both will get tolerated less.

I am speaking from 40-years flying experience. I tolerate crosswinds and bumps less now than I did 9-years ago as I was about to start retirement.

Early mornings are typically the smoothest and least crosswinds in my experience. Higher altitudes typically are also smoother.

I was not able to land my RV-6 in 49-states without turbulence or crosswinds. Had to tolerate some. At my age now, I am not sure I still have the tolerance to repeat everything I have done with my RV-6.
I understand your sentiment, but I wouldn't say no one likes bumps or crosswinds. Maybe I'm just an outlier, but I just passed my 48th year of flying and still commute daily through the "bumps" at <4500' and enjoy the heck out of crosswind landings. It serves to keep me from getting bored.

BTW, Byron (C83), in the spring is a great cross-wind training opportunity. IMO, much like accelerated stalls, the more you do XW landings, the more comfortable you become with them - and the more fun they become.
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  #25  
Old 05-19-2022, 10:52 AM
rockwoodrv9 rockwoodrv9 is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Meridian ID, Aspen CO, Okemos MI
Posts: 3,095
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Ron, I have a couple of the G3x panels in front of me and I will set the G meter so I can see it. I never thought of that. I dont worry about the plane holding together, i have never seen the wing or anything flex on the plane like you do on an airliner. It feels as stiff as can be. Knowing what the bumps are and maybe a lighter touch on the stick will help. Thanks


Quote:
Originally Posted by rongawer View Post
I suspect that some of your anxiety about the bumps (and likely turbulence in general) comes from the unknown, such as "will this thing hold together?". If so, maybe seeing the affect the bumps have on the airplane will help. If you have access to a G meter, (the Garmin G3X will display one), you can watch the bumps happen, see the peak value and actually make a game of it.

Comfort in flying comes with experience, experience comes with knowledge, expanding your knowledge of the the airframe and the flight will give you eventually make you more comfortable, and maybe even make it more enjoyable. Bumps can be fun...

I've found bumps rarely exceed 1G (e.g. you're already at 1G in level flight, a heavy "bump" might pop the G meter to 1.8) and are well within any decent aircraft's capacity. Just pull the throttle back a little and keep it straight and level. No worries.
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  #26  
Old 05-19-2022, 11:35 AM
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Webb Webb is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Jackson, MS
Posts: 1,311
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Bumps are comfort issues. You can do things that can make your ride more smoother.

Crosswinds are a safety issue. Please go with an instructor and get comfortable with cross winds.
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  #27  
Old 05-19-2022, 12:25 PM
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Dugaru Dugaru is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Richmond VA, USA
Posts: 649
Default Altitude variations

Quote:
Originally Posted by GrinchF16 View Post
You will have some altitude variations, the key is you want minimal attitude variations. Keep it fun.
Indeed. The -9A is the Nearly Perfect Airplane but it can be quite the ride in turbulence. Watch a butterfly flapping alog on a windy day and you get the idea.

In those situations when it's super bumpy but you really really need to hold a specific altitude, large throttle adjustments may be required as you deal with big updrafts and downdrafts.

Holding altitude while blowing through towering summer cumulus, etc., is a task best handled by an autopilot--and will still likely require a lot of throttle adjustments. I can fly it by hand, and I've done it before (for example, when my Garmin AP lost consciousness), but it's a high workload.

I sometimes asks for climbs or descents in turbulence. I do this to try to get out of the turbulence, of course (usually through climbing). But I also do this because big variations in climb or descent rates don't matter nearly as much as altitude excursions in level flight.

I've thought about asking for block altitudes in turbulence but I suspect they're hard to come by where I fly.
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  #28  
Old 05-19-2022, 06:39 PM
David Paule David Paule is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 5,364
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Turbulence is one of the two things I hate about flying. I've found that as I got older and flew less, my tolerance decreased. I expect that if I fly more it'll improve. Still, changing altitude for smoother air is often worth doing and I carry oxygen so that I can do it.

Loading the plane up does help, but only incrementally. Changing altitude is the main tool.

Dave
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  #29  
Old 05-19-2022, 08:36 PM
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Tankerpilot75 Tankerpilot75 is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Oklahoma City, OK
Posts: 762
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Wind and turbulence are endemic to flying in Oklahoma. If I waited for ďfriendly skyísĒ Iíd never fly. As others have said altitude is your friend to reduce air turbulence.

As far as crosswinds I strongly recommend you seek out opportunities to challenge your landing skills. At my home airport itís not uncommon to see 20G30 knot winds - hopefully down the runway but often 60+ degrees off the wing. A tail dragger would be smart to avoid the high crosswinds but tricycle gear RVs usually handle the challenge easier.
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  #30  
Old 05-19-2022, 08:40 PM
crabandy crabandy is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Ottawa, Ks
Posts: 2,421
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Turbulence starts bothering me when I canít drink my coffee, I get rather annoyed when I canít even open the spill proof cup to sneak a drink between bumps. When it gets really bumpy I need to make sure my cup is strapped down just as tight as I am so it doesnít break something bouncing around. The turbulence defensively wears on you.

It might be beneficial to go with an instructor and experience 30+ knot surface winds and LLWS days, itíll make the lesser wind/bumpy days more tolerable.
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