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  #11  
Old 01-13-2021, 08:39 PM
Todd82 Todd82 is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Location: Wilmington
Posts: 7
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Sorry for 3 posts in a row.

Anyways the wife and I combined will be roughly 355 lb. We've gotten good at packing light for weekend trips. Typical trips will be in the 200nm range for visitng my family and 325nm trips up to TVC. Paved runway here is 3500ish so that's no issue but the fun places are grass so that's why I was asking.

Another thing, I'm your typical story of I was in training, got married, bought a house, and had to stop flying because of a lack of funds at the time. No more mortgage so now I've got money to buy. I've got over 60hr in a lot of starts and stops over the years, but almost all in Piper Cherokee models. Will the transition to a RV12 be difficult?
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  #12  
Old 01-13-2021, 09:05 PM
RFSchaller RFSchaller is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 2,909
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Todd,

Iíve flown a Cherokee for 35 years. You will find the RV. much lighter on the controls. Iím a CFI and I would suggest you just start over training as a sport pilot. You wonít need a PPL for day VFR in the RV-12. 60 hours spread over a number of years without recent flight experience wonít be much of a leg up on getting your license. A lot has changed in recent years so it would be best to just approach training as a blank page. Your hours still count, and if it comes back faster than average they can be used to satisfy the hours required for a sport pilot license.

Transition will probably be most difficult in getting used to a glass cockpit as opposed to steam gages, but certainly there is no aspect of transition to the RV-12 that you canít do. Itís meant to be simple and straightforward, and with a little study you should pick it up quickly.

Good luck!

Rich
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  #13  
Old 01-13-2021, 11:18 PM
NinerBikes NinerBikes is online now
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Granada Hills
Posts: 1,038
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Are you familiar with the Rotax 912 engine and it's propensity to be designed to run on premium 91 octane Mogas, not 100LL as sold at most airports.

Some of us fuel Mogas almost exclusively.

The RV-12IS with the Rotax 912IS engines have a plane pushing 775# before paint, cutting even further into remaining payload weight to be under 1320 gross max. Add in 119# for 19.8 gallons of fuel.

The earlier built Legacy versions with the 912 ULS with carbs, seem to come in a bit lighter.
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Last edited by NinerBikes : 01-13-2021 at 11:26 PM.
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  #14  
Old 01-14-2021, 07:14 AM
Slightlyabnormal Slightlyabnormal is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Ohio
Posts: 9
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I fly out of KHAO. Often near I66/ILN. I'd be happy to show you around my ULS powered RV-12 too.
It is unpainted. Mark's is prettier.
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  #15  
Old 01-15-2021, 07:58 AM
Todd82 Todd82 is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Location: Wilmington
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There's no real harm in running 100LL though, right?

But otherwise when at home, gotta use those Kroger fuel points somehow, right? Better in a low wing than a high wing.
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  #16  
Old 01-15-2021, 08:38 AM
Bob Y Bob Y is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Piedmont, SC
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Your low vs. high wing comment seems to imply wing tanks. The 12 does not have wing tanks - itís in the cockpit baggage compartment. The filler is on the side of the fuselage. Best you take a look at one first hand to evaluate better. And using LL is ok, just requires shorter oil change and oil tank cleaning intervals. Again, best to have a dialogue with an owner to understand all of the nuisances.
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  #17  
Old 01-15-2021, 10:58 AM
NinerBikes NinerBikes is online now
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Granada Hills
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd82 View Post
There's no real harm in running 100LL though, right?

But otherwise when at home, gotta use those Kroger fuel points somehow, right? Better in a low wing than a high wing.
The lead in 100LL isn't good for the motor, or the clutch in the gearbox. While 100LL can be used, it's not recommended. The tolerances in the engine were not designed for it. Get a copy of the Rotax 912 ULS Owners manual on line.

If you are doing 300 mile trips, and the plane has a range of 4 hour run time, 3.5 actual if you leave 1/2 hour reserve, you should be able to fill up with mogas at your destination, or make arrangements before hand to do so.

It's your plane, once you buy it.

Personally, myself, I try to do everything I can to meet the Mogas fuel spec when my plane needs fueling.

The RV-12 can be used for longer trips, but it's really a fair weather only flying plane. Winds aloft and it's light weight make for a really bumpy ride, so you need to pick the days you fly carefully, check the weather and definitely follow the winds aloft. Where I live, lately, it's been really slim pickings for days that the wind is down enough below 20 kts to go flying. YMMV, based on your location. The RV-12 may be reliable, but the weather to fly it in may not be reliable. Being retired, I can pick my days I go flying.
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  #18  
Old 01-15-2021, 12:25 PM
Todd82 Todd82 is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Location: Wilmington
Posts: 7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Y View Post
Your low vs. high wing comment seems to imply wing tanks. The 12 does not have wing tanks - itís in the cockpit baggage compartment. The filler is on the side of the fuselage. Best you take a look at one first hand to evaluate better. And using LL is ok, just requires shorter oil change and oil tank cleaning intervals. Again, best to have a dialogue with an owner to understand all of the nuisances.
I know the cockpit fuel thing I mentioned it earlier, but *anything* beats climbing up on wings to refuel. I'm only 5'8"

I'm just thinking the times you're "out" on a weekend trip or whatever and need a splash to get home. No issues carrying 3 plastic 5 gallon jugs to Kroger for some premium when it's at home base. I say 3 because if it took more than that to fill I was probably deeper into the reserve than I intended anyways with 19 and change usable.
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  #19  
Old 01-15-2021, 12:26 PM
Todd82 Todd82 is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Location: Wilmington
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slightlyabnormal View Post
I fly out of KHAO. Often near I66/ILN. I'd be happy to show you around my ULS powered RV-12 too.
It is unpainted. Mark's is prettier.
Unpainted = lighter = faster

If you've taken off 21 at I66 straight out you probably flew over me.
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  #20  
Old 01-15-2021, 01:29 PM
Slightlyabnormal Slightlyabnormal is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Ohio
Posts: 9
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Agreed!
I've never landed at I66. I did training at Red Stewart and did a lot of flying in that area. It seems like I'm often near KILN on trips too.

I've had my -12 at 40I and O74 grass strips, one with wheel pants and one without. No problems.

Last edited by Slightlyabnormal : 01-15-2021 at 01:32 PM.
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