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  #11  
Old 04-28-2021, 01:54 PM
tom paul's Avatar
tom paul tom paul is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 20
Default New RV Ferrying home coast to coast

This is an old thread but full of wisdom. I wonder if there are new thoughts about crossing the rockies in an RV. I am the excited purchaser of a gorgeous RV7A with an IO360 and CS Prop. I plan to pick her up in the northern Cali Bay Area and fly her home to NYC, with stops up in Bend, OR and Boulder, CO to see people.
I will check the AOPA info that someone mentioned, but any new thoughts are welcome!
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  #12  
Old 04-28-2021, 02:20 PM
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Fred.Stucklen Fred.Stucklen is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Brooksville, FL
Posts: 428
Default

I helped a new RV-7A owner, whom was a glider pilot, ferry it from Sacramento to the East coast. Not knowing the plane, we decided to keep the legs only three hours long (fuel gages un-calibrated), and follow US 80 over the Rockies...

Quote:
Originally Posted by tom paul View Post
This is an old thread but full of wisdom. I wonder if there are new thoughts about crossing the rockies in an RV. I am the excited purchaser of a gorgeous RV7A with an IO360 and CS Prop. I plan to pick her up in the northern Cali Bay Area and fly her home to NYC, with stops up in Bend, OR and Boulder, CO to see people.
I will check the AOPA info that someone mentioned, but any new thoughts are welcome!
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wstucklen1@cox.net
RV-7A N924RV Flying (1965 Hrs & counting)
RV-6A N926RV 875 Hrs (Sold)
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  #13  
Old 04-28-2021, 02:31 PM
FlyingBanker's Avatar
FlyingBanker FlyingBanker is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Eatonton, GA
Posts: 258
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom paul View Post
This is an old thread but full of wisdom. I wonder if there are new thoughts about crossing the rockies in an RV. I am the excited purchaser of a gorgeous RV7A with an IO360 and CS Prop. I plan to pick her up in the northern Cali Bay Area and fly her home to NYC, with stops up in Bend, OR and Boulder, CO to see people.
I will check the AOPA info that someone mentioned, but any new thoughts are welcome!
We flew my newly purchased 6A from Livermore, CA to central Georgia a couple of years ago. We did 3hr max legs, 2 legs per day (we were in winter so not wanting any night flights). We went southern route, down to LA basin, across southern AZ and NM to El Paso, TX for first night stop. Remainder of trip was fairly low terrain, so no further restrictions.
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  #14  
Old 04-28-2021, 03:11 PM
krwalsh krwalsh is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 381
Default Twice in the past two weeks

I flew from the Bay Area to the Chicago Area and back a week or so ago. I took the route that basically follows I-80 both times. On the way back I got snagged by cloud decks twice, but it was easy to divert to alternate airfields.

The worst part really is the stretch from Reno to Cheyenne. If you have to cross it anything other than early in the morning the air can get very turbulent either from wind or from thermals. I ended up stopping in Ogden, UT and Fallon, NV on the way back because I was just being abused by chop for a couple of hours.
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  #15  
Old 04-28-2021, 04:23 PM
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reak reak is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Loveland Colorado
Posts: 32
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I live in Colorado and the mountains can be crossed relatively safely BUT donít do it until youíve had some training. As others have suggested, follow Interstate 80 and you will be fine. There is a reason the first transcontinental railroad followed what is now I80, those old guys choose that route for the same reasons you should. It can be windy and rough and the usual rules apply, donít challenge the weather and donít hit nothing. KLAR (~7300 feet) is probably the highest runway on the route but itís a good stopping point.
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  #16  
Old 04-29-2021, 09:17 AM
Steve Steve is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Roy, Utah
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom paul View Post
This is an old thread but full of wisdom. I wonder if there are new thoughts about crossing the rockies in an RV. I am the excited purchaser of a gorgeous RV7A with an IO360 and CS Prop. I plan to pick her up in the northern Cali Bay Area and fly her home to NYC, with stops up in Bend, OR and Boulder, CO to see people.
I will check the AOPA info that someone mentioned, but any new thoughts are welcome!
Head east from Bend to pick up I-84. Follow that to Echo Junction UT, east of Ogden, to pick up I-80. Take 80 to Laramie WY than take the shortcut over US 287 to Boulder CO. You'll be up at 9500 or higher much of the route. After Boulder, head northeast-ish to I-80 then slog over to the east coast.
Fly early in the day while in the mountains.
Whereabouts in Brooklyn are you? I grew up in the Sunset Park area.
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  #17  
Old 07-11-2021, 06:26 PM
mbauer mbauer is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Nikiski, AK
Posts: 461
Default Fly Above to Get Better View

Flew Idaho to Mt Rushmore in record high temps with 40kt tailwind. 12,500 ft was still 60degree F.
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Climbed over all the ranges in my way.

On the way back a week later climbed over the Bridger Wilderness Area near Casper, WY. A little bumpy both ways. Headwind slowed me down to better enjoy the view I guess.
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On my return flew a straight line from Valentine, NB to Pocatello, ID. Windy Mountains were in the way. Gave them a 3,000 ft buffer, Afton, WY was just to the South of my flight path. Really liked the high altitude lakes going over this range. Most were still frozen with ice on them. Awesome photos taken.

Not as bumpy as it was below 9,500ft msl, over flat ground, on the really hot days that I was flying in.

I do understand Williwaw in Alaska. When I do my Denali flights, do pay attention to leeward side.

Iniskin Bay taught me about Williwaws. Cold air dropping like a rock to waters below off of Glaciers above. Not something you want to experience!!!

If you fly down in the passes that's where you get the mountain wave. Learned years ago better to go over the top. Why not use the capability of our RV's? Have an issue: you have more time to sort it out. When flying down the valley's you're committed to what that valley has to offer, high enough the valley over might have some roads, or logging trails.

As far as wilderness goes, in the lower 48, plenty of places to land if troubles, not so some of the places I fly here in Alaska and down the British Columbia Coastal Mountains. Idaho Primitive area has a few well placed spots if needed in an emergency.
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Lots of farm roads after Yellowstone, plenty of main roads in Yellowstone that can be reached from 12,500.

The lands in this photo did cause me to fly a little south of planned route, they for sure don't have many available landing spots. There are roads you can see, probably put a RV on it's top. In the zoomed photo, you can see several gravel roads.
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On my trip was thinking, don't want any trouble, but look at all the places to land. Used to fly Hueys, as such always looking where to land in case of trouble.

I've never smoked, carry an oxygen finger monitor, and I do have oxygen available. When going to flight school for the Hueys, altitude chamber was part of course. I was one of the last that had to put my mask back on at 25,000', 6minutes 33seconds. One of my friends did 6:45.

On this flight, could go to 14,500ft before my O2 was at 91%. At 16,500 was down to 86%, added some oxygen at that point. Currently live at 89' above sea level, so had to watch my oxygen when going up high.

Mike
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N999SN 1998 Syd Nelson RV-6 (purchased 2017)
UTC -09:00 Alaska

Last edited by mbauer : 12-02-2021 at 01:14 AM. Reason: Oxygen-monitor added GPS Screenshots removed bdlnds
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  #18  
Old 07-21-2021, 11:53 PM
mbauer mbauer is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Nikiski, AK
Posts: 461
Default Mountain Flying by Sparky Imeson

A great book on mountain flying is one by Sparky Imeson.

Mountain Flying has some great tips of what to look for. Published by Airguide Publications, INC. copyright 1975


Mentions the mountain wave, has illustrations that show what it is. Great tips on how to fly in the mountains. Recommends a minimum of 2000ft above when crossing ridges, I like 3000ft.

Great discussion on how best to test the air as you head towards a ridge. He suggests a 45 degree angle so that if you encounter turbulence you only have to turn a short way to get out, not 180 degrees.

The one thing makes more sense," No such thing as MVFR in the mountains, either IFR or VFR only".

Lots of dos and don'ts. He does not like flying down canyons. Suggests how to find updrafts to help clear ridges etc.. Lots of simple explanations on density altitude and how it effects aircraft performance.

Great book if you can find it, and plan to fly in the mountains. My son found a copy at a used book store and gave it to me the other day. First time I've read it and impressed with his writing style and what to do and how to fly mountains.

Best regards,
Mike Bauer
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N999SN 1998 Syd Nelson RV-6 (purchased 2017)
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Last edited by mbauer : 07-22-2021 at 12:00 AM.
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  #19  
Old 10-18-2021, 01:55 PM
Robb Robb is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Nevada City Ca
Posts: 260
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He died in 2009 while flying low into trees. Sad
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