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  #1  
Old 06-01-2021, 08:29 AM
bill.hutchison bill.hutchison is offline
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 288
Default Leak Fixing Question...

So I've been making some progress chasing down a leak (or two) on my O-360...I'm at the point where I think I know the leak is coming from and I'll be able to confirm it in the next day or so.

I think - I don't know for sure yet but I think - the worst leak is coming from the three rear sump bolts (under/nearest the oil screen/#3 cylinder.)

Naturally, I need to check these for correct torque. The previous owner seems to have added some RTV around there in the past, but I haven't confirmed that that RTV was to fix this leak. Seems like it might be, but I don't know.

If it turns out that it's the sump bolts, and the torque is right...what's my best course of action? More torque?

I am not excited about the idea of disassembling everything under the motor to get to the sump, pulling it, and re-sealing everything, but I'll do that if that's the only way. I'm just wondering if there are other options.
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  #2  
Old 06-01-2021, 08:51 AM
lr172 lr172 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Schaumburg, IL
Posts: 6,519
Default

While the best course would be to pull the pan and replace the gasket, I have a method that has worked for small leaks. Not a great fix, but can stem the tide until the proper repair can be done.

First, determine the length of the flange area that is leaking. Clean this aggressively with a strong solvent. It will take many attempts, as the oil will keep wicking out of the flange. Very quickly after the last cleaning, apply permatex "the right stuff" to the outer area of the flange, covering the top and botom flanges.

The right stuff has a strong adhesion component unlike most sealants. It is a pain to remove because of that, but it is what makes it a good tool for this type of job. I did this on a leaking front engine cover on my son's buick. It was losing a gallon of coolant per hour and this fix got him home on a 7 hour drive without losing a drop. Terrible mess to clean up when I pulled the cover, but it worked well and served it purpose.

Larry
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Last edited by lr172 : 06-01-2021 at 08:57 AM.
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  #3  
Old 06-01-2021, 08:53 AM
bill.hutchison bill.hutchison is offline
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 288
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lr172 View Post
While the best course would be to pull the pan and replace the gasket, I have a method that has worked for small leaks. Not a great fix, but can stem the tide until the proper repair can be done.

First, determine the length of the flange area that is leaking. Clean this aggressively with a strong solvent. It will take many attempts, as the oil will keep wicking out of the flange. Very quickly after the last cleaning, apply permatex "the right stuff" to the outer area of the flange, covering the top and botom flanges.

The right stuff has a strong adhesion component unlike most sealants. It is a pain to remove because of that, but it is what makes it a good tool for this type of job.

Larry
I used the term RTV generically....I'm wondering if that's what the stuff was - it's red-orange in color.

I will take a look.
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  #4  
Old 06-01-2021, 09:00 AM
lr172 lr172 is offline
 
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Location: Schaumburg, IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bill.hutchison View Post
I used the term RTV generically....I'm wondering if that's what the stuff was - it's red-orange in color.

I will take a look.
The Right Stuff is NOT RTV or at least not typical silicone RTV. It is black in color. It is more like construction adhesive than RTV. I would not expect any RTV sealant to work very long in this type of fix.
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Last edited by lr172 : 06-01-2021 at 10:20 AM.
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  #5  
Old 06-01-2021, 09:09 AM
Flyingleap Flyingleap is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Cincinnati,Ohio KHAO
Posts: 143
Default dumb question

Would Proseal work if clean?
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  #6  
Old 06-01-2021, 09:11 AM
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bkervaski bkervaski is offline
 
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Location: Birmingham, Alabama
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I chased a handful of small leaks around the engine for about a year ... I didn't have to do anything but replace star washers and make sure the torque was set correctly.
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  #7  
Old 06-01-2021, 09:22 AM
bill.hutchison bill.hutchison is offline
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Northern VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bkervaski View Post
I chased a handful of small leaks around the engine for about a year ... I didn't have to do anything but replace star washers and make sure the torque was set correctly.
Curious about both your process and what you found. This seems to be a common problem for a lot of owners. Love to know anything that might help me out.
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  #8  
Old 06-01-2021, 12:36 PM
bill.hutchison bill.hutchison is offline
 
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Location: Northern VA
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Also a follow up question...

If I had to pull the sump on a carbureted O-360 RV-6A, would I have to remove the nose gear to do that or would I just be able to remove the airbox, carburetor and associated angle/linkage?
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  #9  
Old 06-02-2021, 08:31 AM
lr172 lr172 is offline
 
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Location: Schaumburg, IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bill.hutchison View Post
Also a follow up question...

If I had to pull the sump on a carbureted O-360 RV-6A, would I have to remove the nose gear to do that or would I just be able to remove the airbox, carburetor and associated angle/linkage?
I have never done it or considered it, but probably no issue. Assuming you have a more modern sump that uses the oil pickup intregal to the sump casting, there is nothing sticking out more than an inch below the parting line of the case/sump. You can remove the nuts / bolts and slide the sump forward after dropping an inch to 1.5 inches to get the studs in the sump clear of the case. If you have an older engine that has the pickup tube bolted to the case, you probably won't get it off with the nose leg in place, though never studied the geometry of that.

If I remember correctly, all of the sump studs are in the front, so you can tip the front down some without having to drop the rear of the sump much before sliding it forward.

Larry
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Last edited by lr172 : 06-02-2021 at 08:38 AM.
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