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  #1  
Old 03-05-2012, 09:05 PM
kevinh's Avatar
kevinh kevinh is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: San Mateo, CA
Posts: 1,419
Default spin practice video

youtube link

You can tell when I was less than pleased with a maneuver from my face. Just rolls, cubans and spins.
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  #2  
Old 03-06-2012, 08:16 AM
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Rhino889 Rhino889 is offline
 
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Great video!

Scott
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  #3  
Old 03-06-2012, 12:32 PM
sandifer sandifer is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: NC
Posts: 667
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I'd like to have a practice area like that. Just wanted to share an alternate technique for ensuring you're square as you pull vertical, FWIW. I noticed you first looking left on the pull into the loop, but then looking right a couple times, I assume to check to ensure you're not dragging a wing up (not vertical in yaw). This works. But you can also learn the exact spot on the wingtip where the horizon bisects it when you are perfectly vertical (in yaw). In this case, you can look left (and continue looking left) while being sure you are square.

I've found that when I move my head left and right that it's harder to precisely monitor pitch rate, and also to prevent very small inadvertent movements of the stick. This is especially important pulling vertical for vertical rolls where you must be perfectly vertical (and stay there) in both pitch and yaw in order to have a chance at doing a good vertical roll. A single wingtip will tell you everything you need to know about pitch and yaw if you learn exactly what it should look like. This might make things a bit easier if you're interested in progressing with more advanced stuff. Bottom line, it's whatever works for you, and there's no such thing as one best technique. Ask five pilots how they time a hammerhead, and where they look throughout the whole figure, and you'll get 5 different answers. I like hearing the successful techniques other folks use (if different from mine) incase there are any tidbits I can pick up. Anyway, fun video.

Last edited by sandifer : 03-06-2012 at 12:37 PM.
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  #4  
Old 03-06-2012, 02:33 PM
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Rhino889 Rhino889 is offline
 
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Location: Jupiter FL.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandifer View Post
I'd like to have a practice area like that. Just wanted to share an alternate technique for ensuring you're square as you pull vertical, FWIW. I noticed you first looking left on the pull into the loop, but then looking right a couple times, I assume to check to ensure you're not dragging a wing up (not vertical in yaw). This works. But you can also learn the exact spot on the wingtip where the horizon bisects it when you are perfectly vertical (in yaw). In this case, you can look left (and continue looking left) while being sure you are square.

I've found that when I move my head left and right that it's harder to precisely monitor pitch rate, and also to prevent very small inadvertent movements of the stick. This is especially important pulling vertical for vertical rolls where you must be perfectly vertical (and stay there) in both pitch and yaw in order to have a chance at doing a good vertical roll. A single wingtip will tell you everything you need to know about pitch and yaw if you learn exactly what it should look like. This might make things a bit easier if you're interested in progressing with more advanced stuff. Bottom line, it's whatever works for you, and there's no such thing as one best technique. Ask five pilots how they time a hammerhead, and where they look throughout the whole figure, and you'll get 5 different answers. I like hearing the successful techniques other folks use (if different from mine) incase there are any tidbits I can pick up. Anyway, fun video.
This is great info...

Thanks,

Scott
__________________
VAF DUES 7/13, 12/13, 03/14
Founder/Director
www.Aircraftwraps.com
Replace paint with performance.

This is my personal account and does not reflect the official communications of Aircraftwraps.com. We have retained a username for such correspondence. I post about formation, eating, aerobatics and pilot stuff .
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  #5  
Old 03-06-2012, 02:38 PM
kevinh's Avatar
kevinh kevinh is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: San Mateo, CA
Posts: 1,419
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandifer View Post
I'd like to have a practice area like that. Just wanted to share an alternate technique for ensuring you're square as you pull vertical, FWIW. I noticed you first looking left on the pull into the loop, but then looking right a couple times, I assume to check to ensure you're not dragging a wing up (not vertical in yaw). This works. But you can also learn the exact spot on the wingtip where the horizon bisects it when you are perfectly vertical (in yaw). In this case, you can look left (and continue looking left) while being sure you are square.

I've found that when I move my head left and right that it's harder to precisely monitor pitch rate, and also to prevent very small inadvertent movements of the stick. This is especially important pulling vertical for vertical rolls where you must be perfectly vertical (and stay there) in both pitch and yaw in order to have a chance at doing a good vertical roll. A single wingtip will tell you everything you need to know about pitch and yaw if you learn exactly what it should look like. This might make things a bit easier if you're interested in progressing with more advanced stuff. Bottom line, it's whatever works for you, and there's no such thing as one best technique. Ask five pilots how they time a hammerhead, and where they look throughout the whole figure, and you'll get 5 different answers. I like hearing the successful techniques other folks use (if different from mine) incase there are any tidbits I can pick up. Anyway, fun video.
Great idea! I'll try it!
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