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  #1  
Old 04-07-2021, 10:58 AM
rockitdoc's Avatar
rockitdoc rockitdoc is offline
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Fort COllins, CO
Posts: 236
Default Scott's RV-14A

So, I 'think' I have decided to simplify the switches instead of ganging multiple functions into single switches. Originally, I was thinking fewer switches would be better on the front, but now, I think I would prefer individual switches for specific functions.

This means taking up more space on the front, but there is room to do it. So, I think it will make it easier for me to remember what each switch does. Also, it makes the rear a bit simpler since wires to switches are also for specific tasks.

The logic, so far, is that start up operations are clustered on the far left, when my left hand is not occupied with the stick. Lights, fuel pump and flaps are on the right above throttle, mixture and prop when my left is busy with the stick.

Anyway, take a look and give me your thoughts on how manageable you think this is. I appreciate your opinions since most of you have WAY more experience than I do.
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14A
Begun 07-23-20
Emp Completed 11-12-20
Slo Fuse Completed 3-2-21
Wiring and Avionics Begun 3-3-21
QB Wings delayed until ?
Finish Kit expected 7-21
Thunderbolt EXP119 expected 7-21
2021 Dues Paid
Reserved: N52XL

Last edited by rockitdoc : 04-19-2021 at 04:59 PM. Reason: Title Change
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  #2  
Old 04-07-2021, 11:31 AM
David Paule David Paule is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 4,767
Default

Scott, I like to have a flow to the starting and to the shutdown. I prefer going left to right for the start-up, and right to left for the shutdown. Yours is more of a hopscotch pattern.

Now that's my preference, and I'm carrying it over from my Cessna 180 to my RV-3B project because it works so well.

You've got an avionics switch, but I think - check it - with Dynon you can leave the system on during start. That would give you engine data then. So your flow is:

Master,
Both mags,
Maybe the fuel pump to the right,
Back to the alternator,
Avionics,
etc.

A lot of jumping around.

Dave
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  #3  
Old 04-08-2021, 07:36 AM
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KeithB KeithB is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Granbury, TX
Posts: 298
Default

In my panel, I opted for all single function switches - I have found I really like a quick glance that “everything is down” after shutdown. The most significant duplication is landing lights and wig-wag as 2 switches where they are often on a 3-way - but I like them separate.

I also grouped left switches for startup (flow) except fuel boost which I put on the right near the flap and throttle. Hopscotch? - maybe but a tradeoff I prefer.

I opted to include an avionics switch (relay based). My reasoning was for easy load shedding in an emergency, but it has also proved beneficial for the frequent boot ups in the shop (even just to get Hobbs hours) that don’t fire up the entire panel.

The bottom line is that you quickly learn your plane and your panel. The fine points would only be an issue for the occasional pilot used to different layouts. IMO and YMMV.
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RV-14A Builder - kit #136
N314KC - First flight Mar 8, 2017, 24th in the air, >700 hrs
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RV-6A sold
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  #4  
Old 04-09-2021, 10:17 AM
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rockitdoc rockitdoc is offline
 
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Location: Fort COllins, CO
Posts: 236
Default First Iteration

So, my first try at this panel looks like this based on a starting sequence of, from top-down and left to right (except fuel pump and USB):

0. ELT On
1. Master On
2. Alternator On
3. Avionics On
3a. Load flight plan(s) via USB if this is necessary
4. Left PMag On
5. Right PMag On
6. Fuel Pump On, until peak flow, Off
7. Start Button until starts
8. Throttle to 1000 rpm, oil pressure check
etc, etc including radio, lights, etc.

If this sequence seems problematic for any reason, please chime in. I appreciate the help and your expertise always.
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__________________
14A
Begun 07-23-20
Emp Completed 11-12-20
Slo Fuse Completed 3-2-21
Wiring and Avionics Begun 3-3-21
QB Wings delayed until ?
Finish Kit expected 7-21
Thunderbolt EXP119 expected 7-21
2021 Dues Paid
Reserved: N52XL
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  #5  
Old 04-09-2021, 11:21 AM
David Paule David Paule is offline
 
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Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 4,767
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What does the avionics switch do for you? Can you eliminate it?

Is your ELT on battery power if it's switch is on and the master is off? Because some are not, and those switches can be left on.

I like to have the prop and mixture set for starting before I turn on the electrical stuff. That way I'm not burning amps or gasoline while I adjust them.

Dave
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  #6  
Old 04-09-2021, 11:32 AM
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jcarne jcarne is offline
 
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Location: Worland, Wyoming
Posts: 1,656
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Scott, I would swap the knob module and the AP control. You will use the knob module far more and it sure is nice in turbulence being able to brace your hand on the top skin/panel.

I would also move that stack up as high as possible.

Looking good.
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  #7  
Old 04-09-2021, 11:45 AM
Nova RV Nova RV is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Leesburg, VA
Posts: 534
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The ELT "on" function on the ACK panel there activates the ELT in case it doesn't activate on it's own in a crash, you definitely don't want to turn it on before flight. The ELT is battery powered so you don't need to do anything on that panel except for using the "test" function normally so I would move that ACK panel lower and perhaps put a standby attitude indicator there in your normal scan area.
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  #8  
Old 04-09-2021, 02:02 PM
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rockitdoc rockitdoc is offline
 
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Location: Fort COllins, CO
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Paule View Post
What does the avionics switch do for you? Can you eliminate it?

Is your ELT on battery power if it's switch is on and the master is off? Because some are not, and those switches can be left on.

I like to have the prop and mixture set for starting before I turn on the electrical stuff. That way I'm not burning amps or gasoline while I adjust them.

Dave
Actually, the avionics could come on with the Master, I suppose. No need to be separate, unless one wanted to be able to switch them off in flight, without turning off Master. In case of smoke coming out of the EFIS, etc?

I think my ELT has it's own battery. Not sure, though. IT's going to be the ACK.
__________________
14A
Begun 07-23-20
Emp Completed 11-12-20
Slo Fuse Completed 3-2-21
Wiring and Avionics Begun 3-3-21
QB Wings delayed until ?
Finish Kit expected 7-21
Thunderbolt EXP119 expected 7-21
2021 Dues Paid
Reserved: N52XL
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  #9  
Old 04-09-2021, 02:12 PM
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rockitdoc rockitdoc is offline
 
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Location: Fort COllins, CO
Posts: 236
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcarne View Post
Scott, I would swap the knob module and the AP control. You will use the knob module far more and it sure is nice in turbulence being able to brace your hand on the top skin/panel.

I would also move that stack up as high as possible.

Looking good.
Good advice. Thanks.
I am planning to move everything up about another 1". I am thinking the closer the EFIS's are to the glare shield, the more shade and maybe better visibility?

Another thing: Do you think it would be worthwhile to angle the right EFIS slightly toward the pilot for easier reading? Maybe turn it so the left side is 1" forward of the the panel front and the right side its 1" aft of the panel front?
__________________
14A
Begun 07-23-20
Emp Completed 11-12-20
Slo Fuse Completed 3-2-21
Wiring and Avionics Begun 3-3-21
QB Wings delayed until ?
Finish Kit expected 7-21
Thunderbolt EXP119 expected 7-21
2021 Dues Paid
Reserved: N52XL
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  #10  
Old 04-09-2021, 07:20 PM
PhatRV PhatRV is online now
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Buena Park, California
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If you are going to cut you panel by hand like many people, these screw holes are PIA to mount the mini nutplates, especially when you have them so close together as in your panel layout. I space mine out by 1/4 inch. I mounted mine in the vertical orientation but that is just personal preference. The hole slot for the intercom is not the same as the autopilot and the radio.
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RV8 standard build: Empennage 99% completed
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Avionics Installation -- 90%
Firewall Forward -- Prep for cowl install
Electrical -- 90%

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