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  #1  
Old 10-15-2017, 02:01 AM
KRviator's Avatar
KRviator KRviator is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: NSW, Aust...
Posts: 859
Default Personal First Aid kits for RVators

As I close in on 100 hours on the hobbs, I'm starting to expand my flying somewhat, to get anywhere in Australia you need to fly for along time, oftentimes over some pretty desolate landscape where it could be a long time before help arrives.

I have held onto one of those military tactical vests from my RAAF days for eons with the intent of outfitting it as a survival vest to be worn during flight. Now, Survival kits are quite well covered here in the forums, so I won't try to reinvent the wheel there by asking for suggestions for that.

The vest itself currently holds a 406 PLB, Firefly strobe light, and an LED Mini-Maglite but nothing to treat injuries at present. So...The question I have though, is what the consensus should be for a first aid kit should you survive the crash with injuries serious enough to require treatment but that aren't likely to kill you before rescue, ie lacerations, infection, etc.

The goal is to have it in a single pouch about 6" tall x 3" wide x 1" deep. The aircraft will also have a Rescue Swag that will hopefully make it out for use following a crash, but this cannot be guaranteed, the worst-case logic being all you have is what is on your person.

My thoughts are along the lines of:
  • Lacerations: 2/3 feminine pads sized to fit in the vest pouch. The KRviatrix suggests using night-time pads as they're more absorbent. A couple of tampons for severe trauma. I figure needing much beyond this suggests you're not likely to survive until rescue.
  • For small cuts, a few band-aids & small tube of superglue.
  • Infection: Betadine wipes or a small tube of Dettol
  • Fractures: Crepe bandage to use with splint, and a few small clips. Triangular bandage for sling.
  • Burns: Non-stick dressing pads. A tube of chapstick for windburn on lips or nose.
  • Adhesion: Small roll of surgical tape.
  • Pain management: A few Aspirin/Ibuprofen/Paracetemol.
  • 'Surgery': Tweezers, splinter remover, small scissors.

Your thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated, all!
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  #2  
Old 10-15-2017, 04:58 AM
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ColoCardinal ColoCardinal is offline
 
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You may want to consider throwing in a package of Wound Seal, QuikClot or one of the other brands of bleeding stoppers. They come as powders or sponges and are more effective than tampons. Consider that you may be bleeding from a place you can't see, like the top of your head.
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  #3  
Old 10-15-2017, 06:15 AM
rgmwa rgmwa is offline
 
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Maybe a triangular bandage. Lots of different uses.
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  #4  
Old 10-15-2017, 06:31 AM
humptybump humptybump is offline
 
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Location: USA
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Duct tape (the ultimate multitasker) and a Swiss Army knife (not the monster but the kind with a couple of blades, can opener, etc, and possible scissors.

Create a "bar" (or two or three) by pulling 10" and folding over on itself. Then, keep wrapping over the thin bar to make it thicker. I keep these in my airplane, emergency kit, truck, etc. each bar is about 6" long and 1/2" thick. They easily fit in almost any pocket.

While purpose built supplies like gauze and sterile bandages are best, I look for the most versatility from the least complexity. In an emergency situation I focus on triage. I am less concerned with ideal solutions and fully focused on stabilizing the situation and survival.

In an emergency, duct tape will:
  • hold lacerations
  • used with sticks or debris to make splints
  • create a tools
  • repurpose the downed aircraft parts
  • used with a bit of fabric to make a bandage
  • hold water
  • temporary fix for some aircraft issues
  • nearly endless possibilities

With just two items, you can create "good enough" implementations of most of the typical medical supplies (and a lot of other stuff).

I do have a unitasker in my kit - a LifeStraw (or Sawyer Mini).

Last edited by humptybump : 10-15-2017 at 07:03 AM.
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  #5  
Old 10-15-2017, 06:33 AM
mturnerb mturnerb is offline
 
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Hypothermia is always a risk, so a mylar thermal blanket is a good add - they are small and light and can be used in many ways. Also - water purification of some sort. Tourniquet? Simple tourniquets saved many lives in the Boston Marathon bombing. (Triangular bandage already recommended, can be used as a tourniquet, but something like this is better: https://www.amazon.com/Pack-Genuine-...cue+tourniquet). Tourniquets have to be properly applied to work - the product shown is much better than improvised tourniquet.

Paracord is another consideration - a small amount can be used in many ways (including, along with the mylar blanket, fashioning a shelter).

The most important thing to have in your first aid kit is knowledge: know how everything in the kit should be used and what the most likely survivable wounds/injuries are.
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Last edited by mturnerb : 10-15-2017 at 06:41 AM.
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  #6  
Old 10-15-2017, 08:25 AM
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JonJay JonJay is offline
 
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Water, water purification pump.
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  #7  
Old 10-15-2017, 09:08 AM
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rmartingt rmartingt is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColoCardinal View Post
You may want to consider throwing in a package of Wound Seal, QuikClot or one of the other brands of bleeding stoppers. They come as powders or sponges and are more effective than tampons. Consider that you may be bleeding from a place you can't see, like the top of your head.
Don't use feminine products; get real trauma dressings.
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  #8  
Old 10-15-2017, 02:56 PM
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KRviator KRviator is offline
 
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Location: NSW, Aust...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colo Carl
You may want to consider throwing in a package of Wound Seal, QuikClot or one of the other brands of bleeding stoppers. They come as powders or sponges and are more effective than tampons. Consider that you may be bleeding from a place you can't see, like the top of your head.
The WoundSeal tubes look ideal. I'd never heard of something like that before, thanks! I'll be adding a couple of tubes of this now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by humpty bump
Duct tape (the ultimate multitasker) and a Swiss Army knife (not the monster but the kind with a couple of blades, can opener, etc, and possible scissors.

Create a "bar" (or two or three) by pulling 10" and folding over on itself. Then, keep wrapping over the thin bar to make it thicker. I keep these in my airplane, emergency kit, truck, etc. each bar is about 6" long and 1/2" thick. They easily fit in almost any pocket.

While purpose built supplies like gauze and sterile bandages are best, I look for the most versatility from the least complexity. In an emergency situation I focus on triage. I am less concerned with ideal solutions and fully focused on stabilizing the situation and survival.
Another top idea. I had included a roll of electricians tape in my survival kit, but this suggestion to 'flat pack' a length of duct tape I like.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mturnerb
Hypothermia is always a risk, so a mylar thermal blanket is a good add - they are small and light and can be used in many ways. Also - water purification of some sort.
I hadn't mentioned it here, but do have a small survival kit for another vest pouch containing a space blanket and PuriTabs, as well as:
  • A flat signal mirror, taped to the underside of the lid.
  • 3 condoms
  • A tiny ziplock bag of small fishing hooks
  • A 2" diameter, reel of fishing line & hook
  • Small box of matches
  • A matchless fire-starting kit
  • 1/2 dozen safety-pins
  • Small ziplock bag of sinkers & swivels
  • Wire saw (two keyrings either end, and diamond wire in between)
  • Razor blade
  • 2" swatch of DPCU fabric
  • Small cardboard with various green cotton wound on it, and needles
  • Sharpening stone

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonJay
Water, water purification pump.
Water itself would likely be too bulky, even a 600ml bottle wouldn't fit on-board the vest, and wouldn't go too far, but purification is dealt with using the PuriTabs in the other pouch. A LifeStraw looks like a good option, but I think the length might preclude its' inclusion. But for $40 at BCF, I think I'll get one to try out anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rmartingt
Don't use feminine products; get real trauma dressings.
I had seriously considered doing so, but the problem becomes one of 'value for space', as touched on by humpty bump. A proper field dressing would be ideal, but take up much more space than women's products, indeed this was specifically mentioned by the instructors on the RAAF Combat Survival Course, and for this reason. The non-stick dressings included for use over burns can do double-duty if needed. Though after some better Googling, including something like this vac-packed dressing might be a goer.
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Once you have tasted flight you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return - Leonardo DaVinci

My Flickr gallery: http://www.flickr.com/photos/35521362@N06/

RV-9A - Finished on 10th February 2016 after 4 years, 9 months and 19 days! The 1020th RV-9 flying.

First flight 26th March 2016. Essential specs 145KTAS @ 2400RPM, 8000', 24.2LPH, Initial RoC 1800FPM.

Last edited by KRviator : 10-15-2017 at 03:00 PM.
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  #9  
Old 10-15-2017, 05:08 PM
Gisnar Gisnar is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Northern Nevada
Posts: 140
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Duct tape,spot elt,butane lighter,knife and space blanket . Tape wrapped around lighter. Fits in chest pocket of flight suit.
Will do all I need to do or can do. If need more stuff than that probably not going to make it!
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  #10  
Old 10-16-2017, 09:27 AM
RViter RViter is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 244
Default Suvival thoughts

Quote:
Originally Posted by KRviator View Post
As I close in on 100 hours on the hobbs, ...
[snipped]
Your thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated, all!
You've already identified the need for 'on your person' and 'larger kit in plane' ... excellent. A 2-level supply of 'survival tools' - the USAF a/c seats were a 'butt-boat' containing a one-man raft and attached survival pack. There was an 8-oz can of water in that pack. We were instructed to drink the entire 8 oz immediately and not ration it. Quickly get a boost of rationality and offset the stress of a bail-out and early dehydration effects. Carry some in your vest and follow that advice. Every X-C trip is conducted with hydration rationing to minimize bladder operations, so dehydration is an imminent risk even without any other injuries. Make your plane kit highly visible to identify it in the debris and confusion.

Thanks for the thread -
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