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  #1  
Old 09-07-2010, 10:43 AM
checkride checkride is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: South Africa
Posts: 9
Default Landing RV-7

Hey Guys

I am flying a RV-7A in South Africa at the moment, but having a bit of a problem with the landing.

The aircraft floats down the runway, my speed are approach at 90mph and landing at 80mph. I think it speed is a bit fast but that what i was taught to use in the plane.

What speeds and technique do you guys use.

Regards
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  #2  
Old 09-07-2010, 10:50 AM
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Jamie Jamie is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
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Yes, that is waaaay too fast.

If at idle (and yes it does matter) I like to do 65-70kts on final and slow to 60kts over the numbers. If I'm trying to land over an obstacle or if I'm high, I will drop the approach speed to 60kts and the descent rate really picks up. I never see a need to slip these airplanes to drop altitude.

If you continue to float after slowing the airplane down you could have your idle set too high. Check that too.
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  #3  
Old 09-07-2010, 10:57 AM
checkride checkride is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: South Africa
Posts: 9
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OK cool flying it on Friday so will try it with those numbers, other then the landing the rv-7 is a awesome aircraft it surprises me on every flight.
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  #4  
Old 09-07-2010, 11:40 AM
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Kevin Horton Kevin Horton is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 2,358
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Keep in mind that each aircraft has its own airspeed system errors. ASI instrument error, static system position error, and possible static and pitot system leaks all may differ from aircraft to aircraft. So, just because one pilot says that an approach speed of XX IAS works well in his aircraft is no guarantee that XX IAS will work well for you in your aircraft.

But, your approach speed does seem a bit high. The fact that the aircraft floats before touching down seems to confirm it. Do some tests up at altitude, doing simulated approaches and landing flares, using the same throttle movements that you would use during a normal approach and landing. Note the slowest IAS that will allow you to stop the descent and hold the aircraft in a constant altitude for a couple of seconds.

Then, do some approach and landing testing on a day with smooth air. Decrease the approach speed a bit more on each landing, until you find the minimum speed that will allow an acceptable flare and touchdown. Add a few knots to this to have some margin for turbulence, pilot inattention, etc, and declare this higher value as your minimum approach speed. Also keep in mind that you'll need to add a few more knots when flying at much higher weights.
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  #5  
Old 09-07-2010, 12:36 PM
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Av8torTom Av8torTom is offline
 
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Location: Yardley, PA
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Default AOA

Also, if you have an angle of attack indicator, pay attention to where the things that Kevin mentioned are happening. AOA will not vary with increased load/weight
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  #6  
Old 09-07-2010, 01:00 PM
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7pilot 7pilot is offline
 
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Cool Try a couple stalls too

"Do some tests up at altitude, doing simulated approaches and landing flares, using the same throttle movements that you would use during a normal approach and landing. Note the slowest IAS that will allow you to stop the descent and hold the aircraft in a constant altitude for a couple of seconds."

Great suggestion! I would add that you should practice a few stalls paying particular attention to speeds - it will be good to be aware of where the bottom will fall out on you, before you get down low on final! Try them with full flaps and then do a couple accelerated stalls too. There are too many accidents that happen when a plane is dirty and turns too tight from Base to Final.
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  #7  
Old 09-07-2010, 01:06 PM
checkride checkride is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: South Africa
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We will try all of the stuff before we even try slowing it down in the landings

rather safe then sorry.

unfortunately i don't have a AOA indicator would be nice, will have to make do with good old fashion instruments, the aircraft is also fixed pitch
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  #8  
Old 09-07-2010, 01:35 PM
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AltonD AltonD is offline
 
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Brand new airplane, I am shooting final at 80 knotts. Yes, I know, it is really fast. But, I am starting to slow it down as I get comfortable. That said, when I pull the power to idle with the field made, it slows down quite nicely. ANYTHING above idel and it will not slow down enough and you will float.
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  #9  
Old 09-07-2010, 02:08 PM
sandifer sandifer is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AltonD View Post
ANYTHING above idel and it will not slow down enough and you will float.
You can land slower WITH power than without. Power is also a good way to MINIMIZE your float should you really need to land on a pre-determined spot.

To the OP - sometimes you have to forget what you were taught. With time in the airplane, I think you will feel less of a need to see a certain airspeed indication to feel comfortable on approach. You will be able to slow it down and feel through the stick exactly how much lift is left in the wings as you fly final and start to break your glide. It becomes less about trusting any particular airpeed indication (which varies from plane to plane). I usually find that the slower I can safely fly the approach, the better and more consistent my landings become. Try practicing approaches at incrementally reduced speeds. You'll find that you have a lot of margin over what you need if you are flying 90 mph true airspeed right now.
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  #10  
Old 09-08-2010, 12:53 AM
flyvans.com flyvans.com is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Zurich, Switzerland
Posts: 475
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we are still in the early phase on our plane (15hrs).
transitioned with jan bussell and he taught 70kts as final speed.
glad that i had the possibility for transition training, we've yet got to screw up and do a bad landing, our airplane certainly thanks us.
we also have an AOA installed, which gives us closer to 65kts (at more or less MTOW) as "ideal" approach speed.

i certainly wouldn't approach faster than 70. also, it's amazing how different the airplane handles between 70 and 65 with just 5kts difference. it also might have something to do with our constant speed prop, though.

to me, at 70 the airplane feels better, more agile and with more margin for maneuvering vs at 65. 65 feels like a "sitting duck" further on the backside of the power curve. however it allows for steeper approaches of course.

that said, with 70 you just have to cut the throttle and inititate the flare earlier accordingly, letting the speed decay to 60-65 without getting scared and correcting for it with power in the very short final. with 65, power stays in noticeably longer, almost to touchdown, and the flare needs to be shorter and more firm.
also note, that IMHO the weight has a way bigger influence on handling/feel/float at landing than on any other light airplane that i've flown so far.

my purely subjective impressions from the first few hours of flying, your mileage may vary...
have fun flying!

rgds, bernie
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