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  #1  
Old 07-04-2022, 05:55 PM
pylotttt pylotttt is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 75
Default rv-6a o320 150 or 160 hp

When I bought my rv6-a I was told the engine was 160 hp. The logs have conflicting data, one page says It's an o-320-e2a and another says it's an o320-e2d. I don't remember what the plate on the engine says for model, but it does say it is a 150hp. The seller said when the engine was purchased it had the 160hp upgrade.
Is there a way to determine if it has the 150hp or the 160hp pistons without taking a jug off?
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1973 Cessna 177RG sold
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  #2  
Old 07-04-2022, 06:02 PM
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Sam Buchanan Sam Buchanan is offline
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If you are using the FP metal Sensenich prop the prop pitch might indicate which version of engine you have. When I upgraded my E2D to 160hp I added 3" of pitch per Vans published recommendations.
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  #3  
Old 07-04-2022, 06:20 PM
pylotttt pylotttt is offline
 
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I have the Sensenich composite ground adjustable prop.
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1973 Cessna 177RG sold
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Disabled Vet, but my paid dues are worth the minimal cost.
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  #4  
Old 07-04-2022, 07:23 PM
Scott Hersha Scott Hersha is online now
 
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Location: Cincinnati, OH
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The data plate on the engine might not mean anything since itís an EAB. I think the upgrade from 150 to 160 hp has to do with the higher compression pistons. I might not be right about this, but if you have the logs and parts list and sign off for the upgrade, you might be able to figure it out.
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RV6/2001 built 2000/sold 2005
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JAN2022
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  #5  
Old 07-04-2022, 07:30 PM
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PaulvS PaulvS is offline
 
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Location: Western Australia
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Default 150 to 160

My O-320 E2A has been upgraded from 150 hp to 160 hp and there is an entry in the log book for 75089 pistons to increase compression for the higher hp. Maybe a compression test could detect if your engine is higher compression, in case the log book lacks an entry for the upgrade?
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  #6  
Old 07-05-2022, 07:44 AM
lr172 lr172 is offline
 
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Location: Schaumburg, IL
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The 160 version has higher compression ratio. It achieves this by increasing the distance between the piston top and the piston pin hole. The resulting smaller compressed area creates the increase in CR. I don't know the difference in height, but expect it is more than a 1/4" If you have a buddy with either a 150 or 160 version of the 320, You could take measurements through the sparkplug hole at TDC and compare. Don't know how you would do this with compression testing, as you would need the dynamic version used with auto engines and no one in the aviation business uses them, so difficult to find comparative data. Can't compute it without knowing the cam details (intake closing angle), which aren't published.

Larry
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Last edited by lr172 : 07-05-2022 at 07:49 AM.
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  #7  
Old 07-06-2022, 06:38 AM
Southern Pete Southern Pete is offline
 
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Carry out a compression test using a direct reading gauge, rather than differential?
E model regular C/R is 7:1, so should be in the region of 85 psi ( 6 atmospheres increase)
D model C/R is 8.5:1 so should be in the region of 109 psi.
All assuming no losses, real world numbers might be around 80psi or around 100psi? I would also measure the height of the piston.

From the propeller perspective I had the same experience as Sam and had to have my Sensenich repitched to 80" pitch when upgrading to 160hp.
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  #8  
Old 07-06-2022, 08:22 AM
lr172 lr172 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern Pete View Post
Carry out a compression test using a direct reading gauge, rather than differential?
E model regular C/R is 7:1, so should be in the region of 85 psi ( 6 atmospheres increase)
D model C/R is 8.5:1 so should be in the region of 109 psi.
All assuming no losses, real world numbers might be around 80psi or around 100psi? I would also measure the height of the piston.

From the propeller perspective I had the same experience as Sam and had to have my Sensenich repitched to 80" pitch when upgrading to 160hp.
Seems way off to me. My porsche boxer engine (air cooled) has about 9:1 CR and registers 160-170 PSI and that is with tired rings.

Larry
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