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  #21  
Old 03-15-2022, 02:23 PM
lemerc lemerc is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Spokane WA
Posts: 5
Default Easier reassembly

A couple of things I will try to make assembly easier, besides splitting the end blocks, are: 1. Drill out the bolt holes in the blocks using a #10 drill. This is .006 larger than the 3/16 called for. This should make installing the bolts through the nylon blocks much easier, rather than trying to wrench them in in the uncomfortable position I will be in. 2. I will use castle nuts with cotter pins on the bolts rather than nylon lock nuts for the same reason.
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  #22  
Old 03-16-2022, 04:18 PM
acrojohn's Avatar
acrojohn acrojohn is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Chesapeake, VA
Posts: 4
Default Removal Sequence on My 6A

After reading all the posts on this thread, I assumed the position with a lot of apprehensions, head first with my back bent over the wing spar. First, everything in the way or attached had to be removed. In my case, this included:
- throttle quadrant lowered
- brake cylinders removed from the rudder pedals and down tube ears and pushed up and forward of the cross over tubes
- rudder cable linkages removed from outer down tube ears
- Right side vent hose removed
I left the individual rudder pedals attached for the entire process.

Next, the AN-3 bolts (6) securing the mounting saddle blocks to the fuselage structure were completely removed from the blocks otherwise the blocks would not be able to slide under the NACA vents. The center saddle mount halves were removed at this point and their orientation was labeled.

The sequence to move the tubes for removal was as follows:
- the left side saddle block and tubes were moved as far forward as they would go.
- the right side saddle block and tubes were moved as far aft as possible (at this point the right block was still not able to be removed).
- the left side saddle block and tubes were pushed up as far as they would go. (This provides enough clearance on the right side saddle block to clear the upright vertical structure. A little twisting of the right saddle block clock-wise a quarter of a turn provided ample clearance to remove the entire assembly.

Locations of control cables for heat control boxes, parking brakes, and other components can cause issues or dictate which assembly side gets pushed and which gets pulled. My cables were on the left side dictating that the right side block had to get pulled out first.

These steps took 45 minutes to complete. Iím heading to the welder tomorrow.

Iím hoping to reinstall by just reversing the sequence. Reassembly may be complicated by the finger gussets on the left rudder tube assembly causing limited spacing between the right rudder tube in front of it. This could limit the ability to twist the assembly Ė maybe not. I donít see how the saddle blocks could be reinstalled (whole) independently of the tubes. Worse case, the saddle blocks can be cut in half and the tubes installed separately.

Keep in mind, your airplane may be totally unique requiring a different set of steps/sequences. As with most tasks on this yearís Condition Inspection, there was a lot more apprehension generated from reading these posts than actually doing the work. The fuel tank removal was another walk in the park. Iíll get back to you with a report on the installation when that is done. Good luck.

John
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RV-6A N30YD Bill Boyd's creation - I just keep it flying.
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MiniMAX N962JA Another of my creations - retired
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  #23  
Old 03-17-2022, 09:13 AM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
Posts: 9,965
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lemerc View Post
A couple of things I will try to make assembly easier, besides splitting the end blocks, are: 1. Drill out the bolt holes in the blocks using a #10 drill. This is .006 larger than the 3/16 called for. This should make installing the bolts through the nylon blocks much easier, rather than trying to wrench them in in the uncomfortable position I will be in. 2. I will use castle nuts with cotter pins on the bolts rather than nylon lock nuts for the same reason.
The plans specifying the use of a #10 drill is not to make loose fit holes... it is to make a properly sized hole.
When drilling UHMW material, it is just fluid enough that it expands when penetrated by the drill. It then contracts when the drill is removed and you end up with an under sized hole. If the hole is drilled with a #10 bit, the resulting hole is very close to the hole size normally made in other materials using a #12 bit.
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Scott McDaniels
Hubbard, Oregon
Formerly of Van's Aircraft Engineering Prototype Shop
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  #24  
Old 03-20-2022, 05:33 PM
kklewin kklewin is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Bozeman, MT
Posts: 226
Default

Did some RV6A rudder pedals come with the upgrade at some point? The SB seems to mention "Check to see if your rudder pedal has gussets installed"? Won't be out to the plane for a bit, but I think I ordered my finish kit in 2002 ish? (Right at the end of RV6 production).

Cheers,

Kurt
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  #25  
Old 03-20-2022, 06:01 PM
abwaldal@gmail.com abwaldal@gmail.com is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Battle Ground WA
Posts: 602
Default Gussets or not?

If you get the new ones and they have the gussets just scream YES!!!! I'm almost sure your 2001 bars will will have them. I bought a set around the same time.
As far as getting them out with solid end blocks. It is possible. I did it.
However putting them back in with solid blocks ain't gonna happen.
Removing them with the NACA installed is possible. Anyway I did. But if the vents aren't riveted in, But were glued in with Proseal, you can slice them out real easy.
Just remove anything in the way and go for it.
Not a short day, But doable.
Your luck may vary Art
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  #26  
Old 09-19-2022, 06:59 PM
Jbon Jbon is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: DFW
Posts: 58
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by acrojohn View Post
As with most tasks on this yearís Condition Inspection, there was a lot more apprehension generated from reading these posts than actually doing the work.
I removed mine today, and while some have obviously had difficulty, mine came out rather easily. . . and I thought I was facing a worse case scenario. The builder had applied this awful foam and aluminum foil sound insulation all over the firewall and side skins that does NOT want to come off! This, and a riveted NACA duct in the way. Anyway, the worse part was getting to the 6 nuts and bolts while standing on my head and a spar under my back. Other than that, I was greatly relieved it was a non-event. So please donít put off this SB because of the horror stories you read here. The issue is serious, and very real. I phoned an RV6 owner friend of mine the other day to ask if he had done his mod yet. He informed that he had done it 10 years ago when the pedal broke on taxi out. DO THE MOD!
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  #27  
Old 09-24-2022, 12:55 PM
mbauer mbauer is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Nikiski, AK
Posts: 502
Default Not That Difficult

I did mine last July/Aug.

Removing: the hardest part was the position you have to be in to do the work. I did not have to take anything else apart. Easy removal: unbolt and carefully rotate as they come from underneath the panel. Split center block on mine. Mark each of the nylon blocks either Pass or Pilot with top block marked on top edge.

I used a lumbar foam back pad for placing on an office chair. This pad was laid down in the passenger seat well. It supported the back and ribs from the spar.

Mine were out in 45-minutes.

It took 1.5 hours to install and the professional weld shop did the welding in 2-hours.

Hardest part of the install: Lining up the brakes using the correct thickness washers. Mine had different thickness that needed to be placed correctly.

Before doing anything photo helped. Wish I had zoomed in on them to see better. Finally figured it out. Brakes wouldn't move, like a hard stop, until lined up.

Mine were starting to fail, paint chipping, visible cracks at 1024hours on the Hobbs. The right pedal was the worst.

I work at a welding supply store. I bought a crack detection kit from work to verify if any other cracks needed fixed. 3-part spray can dye penetrant kit.

Mike
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Last edited by mbauer : 09-24-2022 at 01:01 PM.
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  #28  
Old 10-23-2022, 09:02 AM
MWH265's Avatar
MWH265 MWH265 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Virginia
Posts: 134
Default Finally Did It

I finally bit the bullet and completed the job. Taking them out was not easy. Twisting the bars so the bearing blocks were up/down with the bars pushed one side forward the other back helped getting them out. Switched over all the pedals and reservoirs. I did the bolt mod using the AN3-56 bolts (12 bucks each) on the pedals. I fought to get them back in for quite awhile with no joy. I wound up splitting the block on the right side and they went in in about 2 minutes.

Everything seems smoother now. Not that the swap was supposed to achieve that. About 8 hours total.

Also upgraded to Viton O-rings on the brake pucks and synthetic brake fluid that Vans is now recommending. Haven't flown it yet, still finishing up the condition inspection. Very close inspection of the old bars showed no cracking. 600+ hours on them. I guess they are hangar art now.

Thanks for posting ideas and good luck to those that next tackle the job.
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  #29  
Old 11-11-2022, 07:22 PM
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charosenz charosenz is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Magnolia KY
Posts: 605
Default excellent work and pics

Lemerc,

Post #10,

Thanks for posting the pic. Excellent welding.

Charlie
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Last edited by charosenz : 11-11-2022 at 07:26 PM.
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  #30  
Old 11-20-2022, 11:56 AM
Jbon Jbon is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: DFW
Posts: 58
Default

I just wanted to update my experience with the rudder mod. The job is finally done! The biggest obstacle I faced turned out to be finding a competent welder who could deal with these thin tubes. The first guy I went to came highly recommended by a local pilot. Supposedly, this guy could weld anything. He was a professional welder, and machinist. It turned out, he had so many problems, and made so many excuses, that he finally gave up. He recommended another guy, also a professional. After 3 days, that guy reported that the material was just too thin! Thankfully, he knew enough to stop before he did any damage. I finally went to a local RV pilot who I knew was an excellent welder, and who I hoped could at least give me a good recommendation. He told me to bring them over, that he had already done a couple of sets. He saved the day, and did a wonderful job.

My message is to not take your rudder pedals to just any welder, professional or otherwise. Someone could be a fine welder, but not have any experience with a thin wall, enclosed tubular assembly like this. My friend noted that on these closed tubes, it's important to drill a small hole to allow the internal pressure to relieve as the part heats up. I don't think any of the other guys knew this.

Getting the assembly back in the plane was easy, once I split the end blocks. Since I got them out, I figured they'd go back in the same way without doing this. I quickly gave up and cut them.
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