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  #1  
Old 10-07-2013, 04:34 PM
swordtail swordtail is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Grindstone, PA
Posts: 179
Default Autopilots

trio pro pilot or tru-track is the question! I need to replace my old navaid and this is a confusing choice for me. Is one easier to install or setup than the other? I use steam gauges, so no EFIS to worry about but I may use a Dynon D2 to direct it. Lots of choices to pick from. Thanks in advance for the help.
Stan
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  #2  
Old 10-07-2013, 05:19 PM
DFlyer DFlyer is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Edmonds, WA
Posts: 131
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Stan, A D2 won't direct the autopilot for you. There are several autopilot options available, and a good one is an EFIS-D10A with servos. You can put the D10A into an existing 3-1/8" spot on your panel. Combine it with a handheld GPS (Garmin 496 or similar) and you have a very nice system. But a D2 is a portable attitude backup, and would not be the right thing to drive an autopilot.

-Robert
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  #3  
Old 10-07-2013, 05:25 PM
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Sam Buchanan Sam Buchanan is offline
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Location: North Alabama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swordtail View Post
trio pro pilot or tru-track is the question! I need to replace my old navaid and this is a confusing choice for me. Is one easier to install or setup than the other? I use steam gauges, so no EFIS to worry about but I may use a Dynon D2 to direct it. Lots of choices to pick from. Thanks in advance for the help.
Stan
Stan, you will find that the pilots with TruTrak will recommend "their" brand and the Trio users will be biased toward their choice.

I've not researched the new D2, but I understand it has wifi for interfacing with tablets, etc. But does it have a hard wire NMEA data output for connecting to an autopilot? Also, can the D2 output navigation data such as track, flight plan, etc? If not, you need a GPS navigator of some sort to drive your autopilot.

The Trio can use the Naviad servo for roll control, the TruTrak can't. Both are good systems (I've owned all the Trio systems and one of the TruTraks) with excellent customer support. Installation will be similar with each.

So....you need to carefully study the feature set of the Pro Pilot and comparable TruTrak and decide what you want the autopilot to do in your plane, based on your typical mission profile.

In either case, you will be amazed at what the digital autopilots can do!
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  #4  
Old 10-07-2013, 06:49 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Livermore, CA
Posts: 8,347
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Main differences imho:
Trio is easier to read and operate because its control head is bigger.
TT takes up less panel space because its control head is smaller.
Servo design philosophy: Trio has a slip clutch to remove servo from the control loop when autopilot is off; TT is in the loop all the time but drag is not noticeable in flight (uses a shear pin if something should jam) when hand flying.
Disclosure: I have Trio, and Sam is right, everyone loves what they bought.

Last edited by BobTurner : 10-07-2013 at 06:49 PM. Reason: Wrong name
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  #5  
Old 10-08-2013, 05:04 AM
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Capflyer Capflyer is offline
 
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Location: Gaithersburg, MD
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I had the TT DF2 VSGV in my previous RV with a GRT Horizon. Worked great. In my current RV I have the ProPilot coupled to my GRT Sport. If you already have the servo from the Navaid it can be used with the ProPilot and Trio will even tune it up for you. That saves you one servo install. The ProPilot gives you more information such as altitude and GS plus abilities at the head such as altitude select which you cannot do on the TT without an EFIS. You can pretty much fly the airplane on the ProPilot. It has it's own dedicated pitot and static inputs. Not sure on the price difference but especially with not needing to add an additional servo the ProPilot will cost you less. This is not to say the TT is a bad choice because it's not. The TT is an excellent AP and you would not be disappointed with it. Study the abilities of both to work without the EFIS input and see what is most important to your mission.
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  #6  
Old 10-08-2013, 09:43 AM
TrutrakTech TrutrakTech is offline
 
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Stay tuned for the official release of the new Vizion series. Based on our Digiflight II series it will add altitude select to the list of functions as well as an emergency level button. You can find prices of Trutrak products here: http://www.trutrakap.com/documents/O...mPriceList.pdf
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  #7  
Old 10-08-2013, 11:06 AM
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dynonsupport dynonsupport is offline
 
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Don't totally discount an EFIS either. You can buy a Dynon D10A, pitch and roll servos for $3,700, and you get a very capable autopilot and an EFIS, all in a standard 3.125" hole.
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