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  #11  
Old 04-01-2021, 07:23 PM
Canadian_JOY Canadian_JOY is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 2,390
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Some of us have been using "that other ground adjustable prop" for years. Yeah... Warp Drive. I have a 3-bladed Warp Drive (not on a Lycoming - that's inconsequential for this particular discussion point).

I discovered the prop protractor provided by Warp Drive was "pretty good" when used in the method they instructed - center the bubble between the two lubber lines. It was only after multiple adjustment sessions that I really mastered accurate prop setting. I'll share the secrets here.

Firstly, it doesn't matter how the aircraft is positioned but if one is making multiple adjustments as experiments it really helps to have the aircraft in the same position each time the adjustment is made.

Find a means by which to rotate your prop to a position that we'll call the "level" reference. In my case I used a digital level placed a specific distance from the blade tip - this level was placed on the prop blade leading edge and the prop rotated to show exactly 0 degrees, or level with the horizon. Of course this was done after the prop protractor had been clamped onto the prop blade at a very exactly measured distance from the blade tip.

Once the prop is levelled, adjust the prop as necessary but, rather than centering the bubble between the two lubber lines, always adjust the prop so the end of the bubble just touches one of the lubber lines. Do this consistently.

The net result of these little refinements is a prop which is incredibly smooth and tracks dead straight. With a digital protractor (1/10th degree resolution) I see blade angles that are within the measurement error of the digital protractor.
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  #12  
Old 04-05-2021, 10:59 AM
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M5fly M5fly is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Reno, NV
Posts: 92
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Just ordered the Sensenich GA, I'll report back with my results once I receive and test it out!
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  #13  
Old 04-05-2021, 06:27 PM
pylotttt pylotttt is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 42
Default Sensenich metal prop

I have a Sensenich 70CM7S9-0-79 metal prop recommended for my O320 -6A by Vans. It has just about 100 hrs on it. Are there any benefits to changing to a ground adjustable prop other than the adjustability,,, and they look cooler. They are lighter, does that improve responsiveness to throttle? If there was a nose gear collapse will the carbon fiber blades affect the crankshaft the same as a metal prop? Do the composite props perform better than the metal?

Thanks,
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1973 Cessna 177RG sold
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  #14  
Old 04-05-2021, 07:09 PM
Christopher Murphy Christopher Murphy is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: colorado
Posts: 906
Default 2600 rpm limit

I had this prop in 81 inch pitch and it was a great prop except fot the rpm limit
My GA prop matches or exceeds it with the limit
The W&B was better with the metal prop
Cm
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