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  #21  
Old 04-20-2022, 08:38 PM
Blw2 Blw2 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2022
Location: Saint Johns, FL
Posts: 89
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Many years ago when I was actively flying and very current...not long after my instrument rating, the school has a lease back 7AC Champ...so I went for a tailwheel sign off

Solidly the most fun I've had flying was in that thing.

but I never could get the hang of it. I tried a couple other times in a cessna 120 and a 140.

I think you're right about the Cessna's leading to poor instruction.... but I think it's more than that.

I don't think the tail wheels on those aircraft at least most of the time, were rigged properly. The would make a terrible racket as soon as the tail settled
but I think my primary issue was not being able to get over my fear of prop strike when raising the tail. It just felt wrong to me.
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  #22  
Old 04-20-2022, 08:55 PM
Taltruda Taltruda is offline
 
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Location: Las Vegas, NV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blw2 View Post

but I think my primary issue was not being able to get over my fear of prop strike when raising the tail. It just felt wrong to me.
I have a fix for that.. one trick is to chock the wheels, have a student in the plane and raise the tail. By having the prop at 12 and 6, you can raise the tail and let them see the sight picture where the prop would hit. Usually itís at such a ridiculous angle that the student realizes that you donít need to be afraid to raise the tail on takeoff.
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  #23  
Old 04-21-2022, 02:44 AM
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rv8ch rv8ch is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: LSGY
Posts: 5,109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taltruda View Post
I have a fix for that.. one trick is to chock the wheels, have a student in the plane and raise the tail. By having the prop at 12 and 6, you can raise the tail and let them see the sight picture where the prop would hit. Usually itís at such a ridiculous angle that the student realizes that you donít need to be afraid to raise the tail on takeoff.
Very good suggestion. When I was getting RV-8 transition training my instructor did this - and it helped me a lot. One "sight picture" is worth 1000s of CFI words.
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  #24  
Old 04-21-2022, 06:40 PM
Blw2 Blw2 is offline
 
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Location: Saint Johns, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taltruda View Post
I have a fix for that.. one trick is to chock the wheels, have a student in the plane and raise the tail. By having the prop at 12 and 6, you can raise the tail and let them see the sight picture where the prop would hit. Usually itís at such a ridiculous angle that the student realizes that you donít need to be afraid to raise the tail on takeoff.
nice! I'm going to remember this in case I ever get a chance to try it again!
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  #25  
Old 01-19-2023, 02:10 PM
Ruready Ruready is offline
 
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Location: US
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I am scared to read the first pageÖ. the title got me laughing pretty good, somebody please tell me the op was joking LOL.
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  #26  
Old 01-19-2023, 02:50 PM
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Mel Mel is online now
 
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Location: Dallas area
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Default Exactly.............

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Sailor View Post
I can't count the number of tailwheel checkouts I've done over the years but certainly a ton of them.
If students learning on tricycle gear aircraft were held to the same standards as tailwheel students by their instructors then tailwheel checkouts would be a lot shorter in time.
They are not held to the same standard because most instructors learned in tricycle gear and their own standards are not that high.
I can always tell the quality of instruction pilots have had when I'm doing tailwheel checkouts...some requiring only a few hours and others up to 15+ hours. It really shows. When I realize I'm dealing with a student that has had a very high level of training I always ask who his instructor was. It took a few years before I was teaching another of this fellows students and sure enough another fast checkout....good training is easy to detect.
Tailwheel aircraft come equipped with high standards required built right in for both students and instructors ...
Tailwheel aircraft are not all equal either with some requiring a very high level of skill.
RV's, Cubs Cessna140, 170's and Citabrias are on the super easy level with Pitts, Texans near the top and Pacers and Luscombe near the middle.
I learned to fly in 1967 in a straight-tail C-150. My instructor taught me to fly it like a taildragger. He beat it through my head that if the nose wheel could be lifted, then it better not be on the ground. Not long after solo, I bought a T-Craft.
Transition was unbelievably simple.
On my PPL check ride my T-Craft was down so I rented a C-150. The only problem I had was when the DPE had me do slips I discovered that a swept tail C-150 does not have nearly enough rudder authority.
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EAA Flight Advisor/Tech Counselor, Friend of the RV-1, Lifetime EAA.
Recipient of EAA Tony Bingelis Award and Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award
USAF Vet, High School E-LSA Project Mentor.
RV-6 Flying since 1993 (sold)
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  #27  
Old 01-19-2023, 02:51 PM
Desert Rat Desert Rat is offline
 
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Location: Wichita KS
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Me as an instructor while my pre-solo student is practicing touch and goes

Outside: Yeah, whatever. I'm gonna take a nap over here

Inside: The scary music at the beginning of the military training video

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AGI, CFI, CFII, MEI, A&P, Janitor
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Avionics almost done
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  #28  
Old 01-21-2023, 10:22 AM
Robert Sailor Robert Sailor is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Nanaimo BC Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mel View Post
I learned to fly in 1967 in a straight-tail C-150. My instructor taught me to fly it like a taildragger. He beat it through my head that if the nose wheel could be lifted, then it better not be on the ground. Not long after solo, I bought a T-Craft.
Transition was unbelievably simple.
On my PPL check ride my T-Craft was down so I rented a C-150. The only problem I had was when the DPE had me do slips I discovered that a swept tail C-150 does not have nearly enough rudder authority.
Your certainly correct on swept tail Cessna 150ís or 172ís for that matter, just not enough rudder for proper slips, especially when compared to your T cart. Your T cart was quite the little machine, certainly got lots out of 65hp and on hot days liked to hang in the air on landings.
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  #29  
Old 01-21-2023, 10:37 AM
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Mel Mel is online now
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Dallas area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Sailor View Post
Your certainly correct on swept tail Cessna 150ís or 172ís for that matter, just not enough rudder for proper slips, especially when compared to your T cart. Your T cart was quite the little machine, certainly got lots out of 65hp and on hot days liked to hang in the air on landings.
My 1941 T-Craft was converted to 75 hp and performed beautifully. Unfortunately it has disappeared from the face of the earth. If anyone knows anything pointing to the whereabouts of N36125, I would greatly appreciate that information.
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EAA Flight Advisor/Tech Counselor, Friend of the RV-1, Lifetime EAA.
Recipient of EAA Tony Bingelis Award and Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award
USAF Vet, High School E-LSA Project Mentor.
RV-6 Flying since 1993 (sold)
<rvmel(at)icloud.com>
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