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  #1  
Old 09-24-2020, 07:11 AM
bill.hutchison bill.hutchison is offline
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 181
Default RV Transition Training Needed

Hello, good ship VAF....

I'm in the very early stages of a purchase engagement on an RV6A right now, so that's the good news! Hopefully nothing comes up on the inspection.

The insurance companies are - depending whom I go with - requiring 3-5 hours of RV trike time - RV-12 is excluded.

This time/training needs to come from someone holding a valid Flight Instructor certificate - apparently mine is not enough.

The "official" sources from Vans are locked down right now due to COVID restrictions, so I am seeking some transition training from someone in the VA, MD, DC or PA areas who would be willing to work with me on this need.

I'd pay a reasonable rate, of course, and we could even follow Vans's syllabus for the training if you wanted.

Please let me know if you or someone you know would be interested? Thanks in advance!
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  #2  
Old 09-24-2020, 08:19 AM
fixnflyguy fixnflyguy is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Winston-Salem, N.C.
Posts: 1,373
Default NC?

I have good friend, CFI, just recently got himself transitioned into an RV-6A (he now has the grin!) and is working with a student that just bought a 6A here in central NC. He may be an option if all else fails closer to you, and he has an impeccable CFI reputation in the Carolina/Virginia area. PM me if you'd like his information and I will pass it on.
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Bill E.
RV-4/N76WE
8A7 / Advance NC
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  #3  
Old 09-24-2020, 06:35 PM
flyinhood flyinhood is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: 52F
Posts: 207
Default

Slight thread drift...

I recently spoke to a local DFW insurance agent. I was considering getting a policy to teach in my 6. Initial quote....5,000 / yr. Thats a lot of duel given to even pay for my insurance.

For anyone wanting instruction, make sure to find out who has insurance and if the policy covers instruction. I know the goal is for everyone to have fun, stay safe, and stay friends.
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46 Luscombe 8a Rag Wing, Armstrong starter

RV-6, IO-320, Catto, G3X Panel (Thanks Walt!)
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  #4  
Old 09-24-2020, 11:33 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is online now
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Livermore, CA
Posts: 7,351
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyinhood View Post
Slight thread drift...

I recently spoke to a local DFW insurance agent. I was considering getting a policy to teach in my 6. Initial quote....5,000 / yr. Thats a lot of duel given to even pay for my insurance.
.
Yes, insurance for giving instruction is expensive. And given that the faa waiver for an EAB is limited to transition training only, itís hard to avoid losing money. I know a number of -10 cfiís who have dropped out of transition training. It was a money-losing proposition.
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  #5  
Old 09-25-2020, 03:33 AM
Capt Capt is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Australia
Posts: 672
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Tell me is it an insurance requirement to get some sort of training in Vans machines over there in the States? You couldn't get a more benign type of plane!
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  #6  
Old 09-25-2020, 05:04 AM
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cderk cderk is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Park Ridge, NJ
Posts: 724
Default

I got my policy from AIG this year for my RV-10. The way my policy was written, I needed to have 1 hour of dual and 1 hour solo flying BEFORE carrying passengers.

When I read that, it indicates that I can start flying without transition training (not that its a great idea). Doing my Phase 1 certainly qualifies for the solo flying. Iím wondering if after Phase 1, if I would get a CFI in my plane for dual, would that be acceptable or is that considered me carrying a passenger?
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  #7  
Old 09-25-2020, 06:17 AM
bill.hutchison bill.hutchison is offline
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 181
Default

I'd say it's likely up to the underwriter.

I've gotten 5-6 quotes for owning a 6A. For baseline reference, I'm just under 1000TT, with CSEL, CMEL, CSES and CFI certificates.

Some of the underwriters say I need 2 hours with a CFI, some ask for 3, some ask for 5. Some exclude the RV12, some say it has to be specifically a -6A, etc but more or less consistent on the times.

The big variance is with how much time I need to build to carry passengers....some are asking for 25 hours time in type/solo and others don't care. Seems to be a wide range.

I'm a big believer in training. So even if I meet the minimums I will very likely seek some advanced RV-specific training on top of the minimums. Getting some aero/upset training in my own airplane would also be on the agenda.
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  #8  
Old 09-25-2020, 10:36 AM
BobTurner BobTurner is online now
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Livermore, CA
Posts: 7,351
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt View Post
Tell me is it an insurance requirement to get some sort of training in Vans machines over there in the States? You couldn't get a more benign type of plane!
Itís entirely up to the insurance company. Based on your experience, it may be zero, 2, 10 hours, with zero usually requiring some previous RV time. Keep in mind that for many US pilots an RV represents a considerable step-up in speed.
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  #9  
Old 09-25-2020, 12:30 PM
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MacCool MacCool is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: central Minnesota
Posts: 525
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For me, AIG wanted 2 hours dual before I could solo and 1 hour solo before I could take a passenger. The premium included an Open Pilot Warranty for pilots with 500 hours TT and 25 hours RV-A time.
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  #10  
Old 09-27-2020, 12:03 PM
flyinhood flyinhood is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: 52F
Posts: 207
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobTurner View Post
Yes, insurance for giving instruction is expensive. And given that the faa waiver for an EAB is limited to transition training only, itís hard to avoid losing money. I know a number of -10 cfiís who have dropped out of transition training. It was a money-losing proposition.
In addition to the LODA from the FSDO, you will also have your time / money and wear and tear on your plane. Hard to make giving training "worth it". I'm always trying to find a better way...
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46 Luscombe 8a Rag Wing, Armstrong starter

RV-6, IO-320, Catto, G3X Panel (Thanks Walt!)
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