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  #41  
Old 10-02-2022, 08:18 AM
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9GT 9GT is offline
 
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Location: Southern Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Connell View Post
I learnt a few new words every year removing various hard to get Philips from seat pans near the edges etc.
my language has improved dramatically since I replaced them with torx.

I wouldnít use them for anything structural but for access panels and the like I find them far superior.
Iíve never stripped one. But Iíve snapped a few because they are much easier to over torque and unlubed S/S can gall as others have pointed out
I also only use the SS torx fasteners for non structural fastening, such as inspection panels, fairings, and the baggage bulkhead cover. They go into a cup as I remove them, then give them a quick spray of lubricant while in the cup before they go back in to help prevent galling. I have NEVER stripped or broke one of these.
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  #42  
Old 10-02-2022, 11:49 AM
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RV8JD RV8JD is offline
 
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FWIW: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torx
"Torx (pronounced /tɔːrks/) is a trademark for a type of screw drive characterized by a 6-point star-shaped pattern, developed in 1967[1] by Camcar Textron.[2] A popular generic name for the drive is star, as in star screwdriver or star bits. The official generic name, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization as ISO 10664, is hexalobular internal.[3] This is sometimes abbreviated in databases and catalogs as 6-lobe (starting with the numeral 6, not the capital letter G)."
"By design, Torx head screws resist cam-out better than Phillips head or slot head screws.[1] Whereas the tendency of Phillips drivers to cam out under excessive torque has been listed as a feature preventing damage to the screw-head or driver,[6] Torx heads were designed to prevent cam-out. The development of better torque-limiting automatic screwdrivers for use in factories allowed this change. Rather than rely on the tool to slip out of the screw head when a desired torque level is reached (which risks damage to the driver tip, screw head, and/or workpiece), torque-limiting driver designs achieve a desired torque consistently."
"Torx head sizes are described using the capital letter "T" followed by a number ranging from T1 to T100.[7] But some manufacturers and resellers head sizes are also abbreviated using "TX" or "Tx" in front of the number.[8] [9] A smaller number corresponds to a smaller point-to-point dimension of the screw head (diameter of circle circumscribed on the cross-section of the tip of the screw driver). Common sizes include T10, T15, and T25, while T35 and T47 tend to see specialized use. Only the proper driver can drive a specific head size without risk of damaging the driver or screw. The same series of Torx drivers is used to drive SAE, metric and other thread system fasteners, reducing the number of bit sizes required."
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Last edited by RV8JD : 10-02-2022 at 11:55 AM.
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  #43  
Old 10-02-2022, 01:02 PM
csdominey csdominey is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Alvin, Tx
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I also like the Torx screws,but have made the sad mistake of getting the bits wrong. You can turn a #8 screw with the bit for a #6 for a few turns, but they will strip once you get close to the final few turns. And the two are easy to get confused unless you check the stamps on the bits to keep them straight.
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  #44  
Old 10-02-2022, 01:31 PM
rocketman1988 rocketman1988 is offline
 
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Location: Sunman, IN
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Default no worse

No worse than using a #1 Phillips driver where a #2 is required...
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  #45  
Old 10-03-2022, 12:50 PM
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Has anyone found a source of torx versions of AN525 washer head screws? Whenever I have to remove my cowl, I strip 75% of the Philips heads on these stupid things and have to end up dremeling a channel into them to remove them with a flat screwdriver.
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  #46  
Old 10-03-2022, 02:11 PM
gregfuess gregfuess is offline
 
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Location: Albuquerque, NM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flying Canuck View Post
The picture is quite poor on that website. I've attached it. I have these screws and they are definitely not hex. If you zoom in you can just make out the lobe rounding extending the corners.
My old eyes get older with every passing year. I can see the lobes in your picture.
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  #47  
Old 10-03-2022, 03:09 PM
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rv8ch rv8ch is offline
 
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Location: LSGY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Draker View Post
Has anyone found a source of torx versions of AN525 washer head screws? Whenever I have to remove my cowl, I strip 75% of the Philips heads on these stupid things and have to end up dremeling a channel into them to remove them with a flat screwdriver.
Dare I suggest a torx screw, and a washer?
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  #48  
Old 10-03-2022, 03:48 PM
Blw2 Blw2 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2022
Location: Saint Johns, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by csdominey View Post
I also like the Torx screws,but have made the sad mistake of getting the bits wrong. You can turn a #8 screw with the bit for a #6 for a few turns, but they will strip once you get close to the final few turns. And the two are easy to get confused unless you check the stamps on the bits to keep them straight.
in the rare times I've had issues I'm pretty sure that's what I've done....
and also then the bit gets damaged and so the next time it's used on a proper screw there's a greater chance of issues.

Not so unlike a phillips...never can tell if it's really phillips or JIS or posidrive or supadrive or whatever I think every phillips driver I have around the house is worn from improper uses. I really don't like any of them....prefer robertson, torx, or hex socket
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  #49  
Old 10-03-2022, 06:48 PM
csdominey csdominey is offline
 
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Location: Alvin, Tx
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I really ike the way the torx head will hold the bit for you in a place where it can be tough to get eyeballs on the bit/screw contact. Just let your fingers feed the bit into the screw. Not having to watch it while turning is a big plus in my view.
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