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  #1  
Old 08-24-2016, 03:09 PM
jswareiv jswareiv is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 473
Default Camping List

I am planning a couple of RV camping trips and would like to get a list of necessities, or oh yeah, don't forget this, or you really need this... i.e., you are going camping (Triple Tree/Petit Jean) for a couple of days, what are you bringing? Trying to get ready and warm up the wife to camping, her idea of camping is anything less than 4 star.
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  #2  
Old 08-24-2016, 03:19 PM
David Paule David Paule is offline
 
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Location: Boulder, CO
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If she's never been camping, it might be worth setting up in the back yard and camping one night there for a trial run.

Dave
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  #3  
Old 08-24-2016, 03:30 PM
jswareiv jswareiv is offline
 
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Location: New Orleans, LA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Paule View Post
If she's never been camping, it might be worth setting up in the back yard and camping one night there for a trial run.

Dave
No, she has, just kidding about that, but looking for a good must have list.
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  #4  
Old 08-24-2016, 03:46 PM
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Av8torTom Av8torTom is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Yardley, PA
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Default Camping

What do you have in the way of equipment? First need to decide if you want car/airplane camping or backpacking equipment. Car camping gear is generally less expensive, comfortable but heavy. Backpacking equipment is light weight, more expensive but less comfortable. You should use a ground cloth under your tent not for water purposes, but to protect the bottom of the tent. Make sure it does not stick out from under the tent else it will collect water and create a problem. Sleeping bags have comfort ratings. A bag rated to 0 deg will keep you alive to 0 deg not necessarily comfortable. Get a water proof cover for it. Will you be cooking? - again, car camping stoves are easier to use, and less expensive than back packing stoves but bigger and heavier. Rain gear is a must. Don't spend a lot of money on gee wiz wowie breathable stuff. It's not breathable enough to make a difference in my opinion. I've sweated buckets in Gore tex gear. A good LED flashlight and/or head lamp - again cheap is fine. I have expensive head lamps and my favorite is a $10 Eveready unit. A nice battery powered LED lantern will make the tent cheery at night. Pack your clothing in water proof duffels. I use the kind meant for canoe trips. Sleeping pads. You'll be tempted to get a nice thick inflatable air mattress. They're comfy alright, but will be VERY cold to sleep on if temps get even as low as the 50ies. I have always used a Thermorest foam pad. They come in different thicknesses. Your decision will be made on weight, volume and comfort. A one inch thick pad had always been OK for me. Remember matches, lighters, some extra line (20 feet). I like to hang my sleeping bag outside every morning to air/dry out (use the 20' line).

That should keep you alive and comfortable. I'll post more if I think of it. I'm sure others will have other suggestions.

Good luck,

Tom
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  #5  
Old 08-24-2016, 04:13 PM
jswareiv jswareiv is offline
 
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Location: New Orleans, LA
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Default Camping

No cooking, looking for the best tent to pack in the back of the plane. I won't be backpacking with it, but if it rains, I would like to stay dry. Other item suggestions as well. The 14 has a good amount of baggage space & weight, 100lbs.
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  #6  
Old 08-24-2016, 04:19 PM
Paul K Paul K is offline
 
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Location: Grand Rapids, MI
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Everything Tom said but also there is a weight and balance issue and a pure volume problem. No problem if I go alone but a big problem if I go with my wife. She hasn't figured out how to go light and minimal yet but getting better. For example, I take a two man tent that weight 4.5lbs and is about the side of a loaf of bread. When the wife goes, it's a 4 person tent that she can stand up in and weighs 9.7lbs. Add that to upsizing everything else and all of a sudden your plane is to small!

It's really trial and error and depends on what comfort you are expecting. I will look up a typical travel list and post it tonight if possible.
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  #7  
Old 08-24-2016, 04:41 PM
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Av8torTom Av8torTom is offline
 
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Paul is right on. Like anything else it's a balance between $, weight and volume, but if you're wife is at all uncertain about camping get the biggest tent you can fit into your airplane. I recently purchased a 8'x14' dome tent that weighs 18lbs, fits into a 26"x8"x8" bag and is friggin' luxurious, and it was only $99 at Dicks Sporting goods. They have smaller ones too - go there and have a look. You'll probably find a sale this time of year too.
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  #8  
Old 08-24-2016, 04:47 PM
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boom3 boom3 is offline
 
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I'd suggest the Marmot Limestone 4P tent. You know how tents go, 4 really means 3 people and 3 really means 2.

The thing that I like about the size, and what I think is important, is that you can set it up and get everything out of the airplane and into it. Secure the airplane, put your canopy cover on, and your done. Bring on the weather! With everything inside there is still plenty of room for 2 to sleep comfortably. That and it's relatively light and very well made.

If you ever decide to camp at Oshkosh the above is very important as you've probably heard the thunderstorm horror stories. I wouldn't call myself a true Oshkosh veteran yet, but I've been through 3 or 4 doozies without even a drop in the tent.
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Last edited by boom3 : 08-24-2016 at 04:55 PM.
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  #9  
Old 08-24-2016, 05:03 PM
rapid_ascent rapid_ascent is online now
 
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There are lots of pretty good tents available. A 4 person is a good size if you want some extra room in the tent. The dome type is really easy to setup. REI has a nice one that I've barrowed from a few times. There are cheaper ones available. The cheap tents tend to have only one door. The tents with a fly will keep you dry if needed. I bought a 4 person Alps because it seemed like the best compromise. If I camped more I probably would have sprung for one of the more expensive tents.
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  #10  
Old 08-24-2016, 05:14 PM
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Low Pass Low Pass is offline
 
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I've got a pretty wide assortment of cheap "car camping" and "name brand" backpacking gear. My no-name 4-man (sleeps 1 or 2) tent cost me $30-40 as I recall and after 18-20 trips - and one replaced pole section - it just won't rip or fail. The cost per sq ft of the name brand versus cheap is prob 5 to 1. Packed weight per sq ft of the name brand versus cheap is probably .7 - .9 to 1.

Followup add... chairs are major comfort item. Travelchair Wallaby is my small/light/armchair preference. Make sure you have an air mattress and it's reliable. Never underestimate the need for shade. I put together a home-brew shade for Oshkosh that worked very well using a cheap Harbor Freight tarp and REI adjustable tarp poles.

I bought an AO Coolers brand, soft collapsible type cooler just before Oshkosh. Works excellent for the price ($62 delivered on Amazon). I would add ice every two days, with beer being deposited and withdrawn 8-10 times a day from my camping buddies. Used it as my clothing duffel bag coming and going.

Coffee is via a small aluminum percolator pot, butane burner and instant. Cellular and other devices recharged by lithium booster battery. Just upgraded to 26,400 mah RAVPower booster. Extended trips like Oshkosh - I charge my booster via PV.

Don't think you have to hundreds of dollars for camping gear. Because value doesn't always match the price tag.
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Last edited by Low Pass : 08-25-2016 at 11:28 AM.
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