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  #1  
Old 01-17-2022, 06:35 AM
rwarre rwarre is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Wray, Co
Posts: 658
Default Ice

Ok now I am stuck in Rock Hill(uza) until the temps and runway gets better. Need some education about flying out possibly tomorrow. High expected to be 44 degrees. Should I worry about wings icing up heading west at 8000 ft. Any other info greatly appreciated. I thought this area didnít get snow. I came out for the warm weather.
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  #2  
Old 01-17-2022, 07:10 AM
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B Cunningham B Cunningham is offline
 
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Location: Louisville, KY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwarre View Post
Should I worry about wings icing up heading west at 8000 ft. Any other info greatly appreciated. I thought this area didnít get snow. I came out for the warm weather.
Hmm. Where to start. Did you get a weather briefing before deciding to fly to SC this past weekend? Did you know that there was a major snow and ice event bearing down on the area? And you are now wondering if you can get some education on icing conditions?
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  #3  
Old 01-17-2022, 07:16 AM
PilotjohnS PilotjohnS is offline
 
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Location: Southwest
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Default Icing

As long as one is not in visible moisture, or at an air temperature above freezing, one should remain ice free. Just my opinion, use it at your own risk.
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  #4  
Old 01-17-2022, 07:17 AM
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Prepperpilot Prepperpilot is online now
 
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Yup. I squeeked back home just as front coming through central ohio. Dicey for sure. Forcast was off quite a bit. Saw the pressure dropping rapidly on the way back to base and hit warp speed. Was definitely on the edge. Next time, watch the weather a little bit more!! 10min later, might have had different outcome.
Fly safe friends.
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  #5  
Old 01-17-2022, 07:21 AM
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Sam Buchanan Sam Buchanan is online now
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Location: North Alabama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwarre View Post
Ok now I am stuck in Rock Hill(uza) until the temps and runway gets better. Need some education about flying out possibly tomorrow. High expected to be 44 degrees. Should I worry about wings icing up heading west at 8000 ft. Any other info greatly appreciated. I thought this area didnít get snow. I came out for the warm weather.
I say this with all due respect...but if you feel the need to ask this question you don't have the training to even begin to contemplate flying where ice is a remote possibility. Park the plane and drive home if necessary....stay safe to fly another day.
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  #6  
Old 01-17-2022, 07:26 AM
Freemasm Freemasm is offline
 
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Location: Orlando
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PilotjohnS View Post
As long as one is not in visible moisture, or at an air temperature above freezing, one should remain ice free. Just my opinion, use it at your own risk.
"Local" conditions on your airframe where high velocities make low pressure areas => local ice formation even if the ambient temp is above 32 degF. Make sure you give yourself some margin. Just saying.

Last edited by Freemasm : 01-17-2022 at 07:52 AM.
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  #7  
Old 01-17-2022, 07:42 AM
sailvi767 sailvi767 is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Charlotte NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwarre View Post
Ok now I am stuck in Rock Hill(uza) until the temps and runway gets better. Need some education about flying out possibly tomorrow. High expected to be 44 degrees. Should I worry about wings icing up heading west at 8000 ft. Any other info greatly appreciated. I thought this area didnít get snow. I came out for the warm weather.
You should have good weather heading Westbound. If they plow the airport you should be able to get out this afternoon. You need visible moisture and below freezing temps to pick up ice. Itís going to be mostly clear heading west. If your aircraft was not hangared I would advocate getting it into a heated hangar for several hours before departing. With the wind and combination of sleet, snow, freezing rain and ice pellets itís a good way to insure no ice is hiding somewhere.
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  #8  
Old 01-17-2022, 09:28 AM
rwarre rwarre is offline
 
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Location: Wray, Co
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Glad for all the advice. Most of the stuff I was aware of. Just making sure I covered all my bases.
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  #9  
Old 01-17-2022, 10:04 PM
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avrojockey avrojockey is offline
 
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Currently reading a book about ferry pilot adventures. One technique used when ferrying, when loaded up with ice, was to fly so close the water the salt spray from waves would wash over and deice you.

Since you're not navigating the North Atlantic, I wouldn't fly.

Seriously though, I wouldn't unless you can pick a safe altitude at least couple degrees above freezing. Even then, always have an out incase something unforeseen happens...higher, lower or laterally. Your flight planning should have a healthy dose of airmass study and temperatures aloft along your route of flight.

Here's what I know about icing...
  1. Visible moisture must be present
  2. The temperature of the collecting surface must be at or below freezing, the OATs only relevance is that it effects the temperature of said surface

However, the above doesn't guarantee ice. The severity of the ice ( NIL-Extreme) depends on many factors, but the most likely environment to be conducive will be near 32F with an airmass containing enough water by volume to produce precipitation...rain and drizzle being the worst.

If you can find it, NASA has some fantastic videos dedicated to inflight icing, and they contain valuable information if you care to dive into it whilst firmly grounded. One of the more interesting things found that freezing drizzle produces significantly more icing that freezing rain due to quantity of water per air volume.
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Last edited by avrojockey : 01-17-2022 at 10:20 PM.
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  #10  
Old 01-18-2022, 07:06 AM
ShortSnorter ShortSnorter is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: NOLA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by avrojockey View Post
Currently reading a book about ferry pilot adventures. One technique used when ferrying, when loaded up with ice, was to fly so close the water the salt spray from waves would wash over and deice you.
This book wouldn't happen to be Air Vagabond?
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