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  #11  
Old 12-29-2014, 10:57 AM
RFSchaller RFSchaller is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Phoenix, AZ
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Randy,

Consider me poked!😛

Rich
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  #12  
Old 01-01-2015, 06:23 PM
Loki Loki is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Marysvale, UT
Posts: 53
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Always do the 100 hr. And annual condition inspection together. List it in the logbook as such and use the Rotax Engine check list and our RV12 check list. This way you always comply with the FAA, Rotax and Vans as far as inspections and you won't have to do separate inspections for a 100 hr. and annual. Neither Rotax or the FAA care how often you do those inspections.


So if you fly less than 100 hrs. a year you will get to the annual first and if you fly more than 100 hrs a year you will get to that one first. When one is due do them both and log both. Keep the signed off check list and do a good detailed logbook entry.

It will keep the aircraft re-sale value up by as much as $5K to $10K over sloppy non descript books.
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  #13  
Old 01-01-2015, 10:47 PM
RFSchaller RFSchaller is offline
 
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Location: Phoenix, AZ
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I don't want to poke a hornets nest, but let me ask what folks think about the frequency and intrusiveness of some of the recommended ROTAX inspections. For example, popping the bowls off carburetors every annual seems excessive if you are using high quality fuel and a gascolator. Are folks finding that the frequency of recommended inspections is justified by the results?
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  #14  
Old 01-02-2015, 12:09 AM
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rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RFSchaller View Post
I don't want to poke a hornets nest, but let me ask what folks think about the frequency and intrusiveness of some of the recommended ROTAX inspections. For example, popping the bowls off carburetors every annual seems excessive if you are using high quality fuel and a gascolator. Are folks finding that the frequency of recommended inspections is justified by the results?
AC43 appendix D specifies (the standard that annual and condition inspections are done against) that the gascolator screen, and inlet screen of a carb or fuel servo be inspected on a traditional aircraft engine, so I don't see how the recommended procedures for a Rotax are any different than what is already an industry standard (even for a cessna, piper, etc.).

A gascolator catches any contaminants up stream of the gascolator.
There is still a lot of hose down stream of the gascolator.
It is not uncommon for hose to release particles into the fuel system.
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Opinions, information and comments are my own unless stated otherwise. They do not necessarily represent the direction/opinions of my employer.

Scott McDaniels
Hubbard, Oregon
Van's Aircraft Engineering Prototype Shop Manager
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  #15  
Old 01-02-2015, 11:43 AM
RFSchaller RFSchaller is offline
 
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Scott,

That makes sense. I was just wondering if the field experience validates the frequency and scope.

Rich
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  #16  
Old 01-06-2015, 05:13 AM
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f1rocket f1rocket is offline
 
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I've nearly completed my first condition inspection and I thought I'd post what I found. I only found three things that required any attention at all, and all were fairly minor.

I added the fuel vent kit to my tank as part of the inspection, and I did find a little residue in the bottom of the tank. Nothing significant, just a little dusty golden-colored residue on the bottom. The gascolator and tank screens were all clear. There's another thread about this. My finding are consistent with what others have found. I have used a combination of 100 LL, ethanol-free 90 octane, and 93 octane Shell with 10% ethanol.

I found a minor fuel leak in the center tunnel where the fuel line goes into the back of the gascolator. I had replaced the red cube earlier and I didn't get that fitting very tight because of the close quarters. I asked my son to climb in there and tighten it up this time. He bends better than I do.

I did the first float check in the carburetors and one of my floats failed. Simple to check and simple to replace. I already had the floats and the gaskets on hand so no biggie.

To close the loop on my original post in this thread, I read the inspection list very carefully. Since the engine just had a 100 hr check completed, I did a 25 hour check. Filled out all the paperwork and filed it in the log book. According to my read, this was the appropriate and legal approach to take.

I'm now ready for another flying season.
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Paid through 2043!
Lund fishing Boat, 2017, GONE FISHING
RV-12 - Completed 2014, Sold
427 Shelby Cobra - Completed 2012, Sold
F1 EVO - partially completed, Sold
F1 Rocket - Completed 2005, Sold
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RV-6 - Completed 2000, Sold
Long-EZ - Completed 1987, Sold


Last edited by f1rocket : 01-06-2015 at 05:16 AM.
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