VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

-POSTING RULES
-Advertise in here!
- Today's Posts | Insert Pics

Keep VAF Going
Donate methods

Point your
camera app here
to donate fast.


Go Back   VAF Forums > Main > Virtual Hangar
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-23-2012, 12:49 PM
Ironflight's Avatar
Ironflight Ironflight is offline
VAF Moderator / Line Boy
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Dayton, NV
Posts: 12,830
Default RV-3B - NX13PL - ?Tsamsiyu?



Our RV-3B was completed and first flown in December of 2011 after a two and a half year build. Phase 1 testing was completed in early 2012, and it spent about seven weeks in the April/May at GLO Custom being painted by Grady, Brandon, and their airbrush artist collaborator Scott ?Shark? Draper. The design is inspired by the fictional Ikran?s of the movie Avatar ? flying creatures which literally become one with their rider and make flight in three dimensions nearly effortless. That is, in fact, what it is like to fly the RV-3, and we are extremely happy with the results. ?Tsamsiyu? is the word for Warrior in the Navi language created for the movie, and we refer to the airplane as ?Tsam? for brevity. This was Paul?s second complete RV build, and a first for Louise ? it was a great learning experience for both, and we found the challenge of Van?s most ?primitive? kit to be an excellent match for both of us.



The airplane was configured for two different missions, and is therefore a compromise of sorts. Our needs are for a solo flying machine with IFR capability and good speed, while at the same time we wanted a fun and nimble machine for recreational flying. This aircraft was also designed to be a test bed of sorts for avionics and advanced engine features. It needed comfortable seating with a cockpit that could be inhabited for hours at a time, and this added weight and complexity that makes it unlike its much lighter, purely-recreational RV-3?s. As delighted as we are with the handling of this wonderful RV-3, we are told that for a real treat, we need to try a light one someday - and as incredibly nimble as we find Tsam to be, I look forward to anything that could be even better still.



The airplane is equipped with a Mattituck red/Gold IO-320 built from all-Lycoming components. It is equipped with eh Silverhawk fuel injection system and Dual P-Mags firing automotive spark plugs. The propeller is the three-blade Whirlwind 151 with the late-model steel-ferule blades and the high-pressure Jihostro governor. We equipped the powerplant with what is referred to as a ?Half Raven? inverted system which amounts to a large oil tank that conserves breather-oil during inverted flight and routes it back into the sump. We elected not to install the three-way valve for full inverted capability due t limitations of space and the need for sustained inverted flight.



The cockpit was designed around the G3X avionics stack, a comfortable Oregon Aero seat, and having enough storage to keep things organized on a long day of flying. The side consoles were a result of choosing the DJM Deluxe Throttle Quadrant (with a ?Fatboy? pistol grip), then using that as a width and height standard. The switch/circuit breaker panel on the right was made to mirror the quadrant. The resulting consoles provide good storage for maps-sized objects, and have cushioned arm-rests. The center avionics stack solved the problem of where to put the radios on such a small panel. The use of the G3X drastically reduced the weight of the panel itself, and the backup instruments were chosen for lightweight. LED lighting is used for night operations. The canopy handle was built so that ?forward? is locked ? opposite from the plans, but more consistent with other aircraft. The baggage area behind the seat was fitted with 0.016? aluminum side panels to hide wiring and keep baggage from interfering with the rudder cables.



The aircraft systems include all-LED lighting from AeroLED (Pulsar strobe/Nav lights and Aerosun 1600 Landing lights). The Garmin G3X EFIS interfaces with the engine, fuel system, and autopilot to provide intelligent information to the pilot. The avionics stack includes a Garmin 430W for IFR navigation, an SL-40 as a second Comm radio, GTX 330 transponder that provides traffic information, and a GMA 240 audio panel. XM audio and Weather is provided as part of the G3X installation. Backup instruments consist of a Tru Trak ADI and traditional 2 ? ?? ASI and Altimeter. The electrical system includes a diode-isolated dual-bus configuration that powers all critical loads simultaneously without switching, allowing seamless power transfer in the case of a bus shutdown. The essential bus can be powered form the auxiliary battery for engine start, allowing EFIS power-up and monitoring before the engine is running. The Tru track GXPilot autopilot is likewise dual-powered, and interfaces with the EFIS as designed. Critical functions for navigation and communication are located on the Infinity stick grip.



The airframe is built per plans with a few exceptions . A Todd?s Canopies ?tall-man? bubble (tinted) replaced the stock canopy for added headroom. In addition, variations were made in building custom fiberglass cowl cheek extensions with built-in storage compartments, a custom-molded canopy skirt, and hand-made empennage fairing. The tail wheel fork is a high-clearance ?Bell? style, and a lightweight DJM tail wheel was installed to keep the CG farther forward. The Odyssey PC-680 battery is located behind the pilot?s seat , laying down under a custom enclosure. A welded steel roll bar was installed behind the pilot?s head, custom made for the installation. The flaps were converted from manual to electric with a special torque tube made my McCutcheon Metalworks ? they made us a special one without the lever, and with a mounting tab for a linear actuator. This was done to free the cockpit from the manual lever. The Oregon Aero seats were modified from their stock design template by adding a couple of inches to the height and with the addition of seat heating elements. Natural sheepskin was used for the seating surface for comfort when it is both cool and hot. A custom Micro-Softie parachute with sheepskin pad and purple webbing to match the Crow harness was part of the initial buy, to encourage use of the chute during testing. It is as comfortable as the regular seat back.



Overall, Tsamsiyu has proven to be everything that we hoped for ? a fun machine that travels well with one aboard. It is certainly at the heavy end of the RV-3 lineage, and we knew that would be the case going in. In fact, our future projects list includes a potential ?bare bones? -3?.just to see the difference!

Paul
__________________
Paul F. Dye
Editor at Large - KITPLANES Magazine
RV-8 - N188PD - "Valkyrie"
RV-6 (By Marriage) - N164MS - "Mikey"
RV-3B - N13PL - "Tsamsiyu"
A&P, EAA Tech Counselor/Flight Advisor
Dayton Valley Airpark (A34)
http://Ironflight.com
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-27-2013, 07:58 AM
TClinton TClinton is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Spruce Creek Fly-In, Florida
Posts: 22
Question Tsamsiyu

Hi Paul. What a beautiful airplane you guys built!!! Can you tell me what the two "hoses" are that run from above the Dragon's eye on each side aft and stop about the aft edge of the canopy? Thanks, Tony
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-27-2013, 08:17 AM
Louise Hose's Avatar
Louise Hose Louise Hose is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Dayton, Nevada --- A34
Posts: 1,469
Default If I may answer....

Paul is tied up today.

The painting is inspired by the Ikrans in the movie Avatar. They had these long appendages that the warrior both made a physical/mental bond through and used as reins. You'd have to see the movie to fully understand.
__________________
Louise Hose, Editor of The Homebuilder's Portal by KITPLANES
RV3B, NX13PL "Tsamsiyu" co-builder, TMXIO-320, test platform Legacy G3X/TruTrak avionics suite
RV-6 ?Mikey? (purchased flying) ? Garmin test platform (G3X Touch, GS28 autopilot servos, GTN650 GPS/Nav/Comm,
GNC255 Nav/Com, GA240 audio panel)
RV8, N188PD "Valkyrie" (by marriage)

Last edited by Ironflight : 01-27-2013 at 05:46 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-27-2013, 08:36 AM
pierre smith's Avatar
pierre smith pierre smith is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Louisville, Ga
Posts: 7,911
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TClinton View Post
Hi Paul. What a beautiful airplane you guys built!!! Can you tell me what the two "hoses" are that run from above the Dragon's eye on each side aft and stop about the aft edge of the canopy? Thanks, Tony
It's an illusion...there are no "hoses" there..it's all done by the artist. The skin is smooth there. I asked the same question before.

Best,
__________________
Rv10 Sold
46 years ag pilot/CFI
Air Tractor 502/PT-6
Building RV-12, Wings, fuse, emp complete. FWF in progress.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-27-2013, 09:02 AM
Clarkie Clarkie is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Huntersviile, NC
Posts: 218
Default

Great job guys! Beautiful airplane.
__________________
Tom Clark
RV-6 Sold
F1 Rocket
Lake Norman Airpark - 14A
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-13-2013, 08:18 PM
Ironflight's Avatar
Ironflight Ironflight is offline
VAF Moderator / Line Boy
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Dayton, NV
Posts: 12,830
Default RV-3 Modifications and Product Evaluations (Part 1)

[After 300 Hours of flying our RV-3, I ran across these notes that i prepared early on to share with others who might be coming on along behind us....the file was lost in cyberspace all that time, but now it is found!]

When we built the RV-3, I tried very hard not to build a miniature RV-8?.I didn?t want to make all the same choices that we did on that airplane, and end up learning nothing new. So we tried to make some different choices, use new products, and go down slightly different paths with
the new airplane. Now that we have about 300 hours on the plane, I decided to make a list of the ?new stuff? and see how it is working out so far. Starting at the nose and working towards the tail:

Whirlwind 151 Prop ? this is a remarkable propeller ? smooth, fast, with good acceleration. It better be good, considering the cost! The nickel leading edges are holding up with not a single ding, even though we have operated off of a variety of surfaces. There was a little grease flinging early on (just a little seepage which Whirlwind says was normal) but that stopped quickly. This prop does NOT act like a speed brake (ala Hartzells) when you pull the power back, so don?t count on it fixing a long/hot landing.

Mattituck Red/Gold IO-320 ? What a beautiful engine! It is a pity that you can?t get one built like this anymore, since TCM closed Mattituck. But it is built from a Lycoming kit, has roller tappets, and is very smooth. Oil consumption is scarily low?.we might have added a quart since the last oil change about 40 hours ago.

Silverhawk Fuel Injection ? extremely smooth fuel delivery, it has allowed very precise leaning. It comes without a purge valve, and so far, this has been OK in general. Louise had some interesting starting experiences at very high density altitudes (8,000 ? 10,000?) on her first western trip, and there were a couple of times she just had to wait for things to cool down a bit. We?ve since been operating it at lots of high altitude fields, and it just takes some adjustment to our ?normal? techniques ? no big deal. I was very happy that we got the unit modified with the ?reversed? mixture lever, so that we didn?t have to carve into the FAB for installation ? a worthwhile mod.

P-Mags ? aside from an annoying interference with our XM receiver (which I believe was due to a poor spark plug/wire connection), the P-mags have been incredible. They just work ? which is what I want from an ignition. They give an almost car-like start when the engine is cool, and I believe they make hot starts easier. I liked them well enough that we retrofitted them on the RV-8.

Half-Raven Inverted oil ? this basically consists of the Raven oil tank and sump fitting without using the switching valve to give true inverted lubrication capability. Essentially, it is just a big slobber pot to catch the oil spit out the breather when you go inverted, and return it to the sump. This has worked GREAT for the kind of aerobatics (not sustained inverted) I do. It is nice not to belch oil out the breather on those occasional zero-G or beyond maneuvers. I?d say that the system has definitely allowed me more freedom to explore the handling of the -3, since I am not worried about cleaning the mess up afterwards.

G3X Sensor package ? those Kavlico sensors are outstanding! And the quality CHT and EGT probes are all well matched. Putting the red cube between the servo and spider has proven to be rock solid ? both structurally and with accurate measurements.

ACS control cables ? we went with the ?no nut? cables from ACS after disappointing lifetime results from the stock Van?s cables on the RV-8 (need replacing due to heat problems after 500 hours or so). They are lighter and more flexible ? but you do need to use the special clamp (or make something similar) that ACS sells, and adapt the Van?s bracketry a bit. Well worth it in my estimation at this point.

Glideslope Antenna in the right gear leg fairing ? this has worked really well ? simply used a bulkhead connection through the firewall, and ran the stripped Coax down the leg inside the fiberglass. Usually locked on before you get vectored to the localizer, or throughout the procedure turn.

Home-made ?hidden hinge? oil door ? this looks really nice and works OK ? because of the geometry and space requirements, it doesn?t really open all the way ? the channel for the cheeks gets in the way of mounting the hinge. It is plenty adequate to check the oil ? it just doesn?t stand wide open if you want to cool things off on the ground. I could probably do better if I did another one. I?m not sure the one that you can purchase would work without modification because of the cheek cowl shapes.

FWF Hoses- everything has worked out fine, with no rubbing, chafing, or leaks (except for the typical pesky Lycoming leak I just can?t seem to find ? not from a hose though?.we had our fuel lines made by TS Flightlines ? the fit has been great. I built up the oil lines myself from Aeroquip parts and the vent lines are stainless steel jacketed convolute from TS Flightlines that really add class ? but it?s expensive hose.
__________________
Paul F. Dye
Editor at Large - KITPLANES Magazine
RV-8 - N188PD - "Valkyrie"
RV-6 (By Marriage) - N164MS - "Mikey"
RV-3B - N13PL - "Tsamsiyu"
A&P, EAA Tech Counselor/Flight Advisor
Dayton Valley Airpark (A34)
http://Ironflight.com
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-13-2013, 08:19 PM
Ironflight's Avatar
Ironflight Ironflight is offline
VAF Moderator / Line Boy
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Dayton, NV
Posts: 12,830
Default RV-3 Modifications and Product Evaluations (Part 2)

Fiberglass Cheek Cowl Extensions - Although it was glass work (yuck!), I think we got better results doing this than if we had tried to use the aluminum parts. These are no doubt heavier by a small amount. We faired them into the fuselage, hiding the mounting flanges and rivets, and I think they turned out pretty nice. The hatches to turn them into storage compartments took about 30 hours to make, but work well ? they were just very finicky to get the final fit right. They also couldn?t be made large enough to fit a quart of oil inside?.but they are great for tools, rags, tie-downs, etc.

Cowl pins and Skybolt fasteners ? we used Skybolts on the firewall and hinge pins for the seam between upper and lower, and this has worked well with the odd shapes of the cowl cheeks. It was a little tough figuring out exactly what we needed in terms of Skybolts ? we started with the RV-4 kit, and then added a bunch. We had already made flanges when they announced their segmented flanges, so we didn?t get a chance to try those. The hinge pins get inserted from the cheek cowl hatches, and this works REALLY well. We went to slightly smaller hinge pins to make insertion and removal a little easier.

EFII Fuel Pump ? this has turned out to operate flawlessly, and it installed really easy. It has a very ?mountable? shape and fit between the forward floor ribs ? although it took some tight bending to make the fuel lines work in there (the -3 is tiny!). I?d definitely go with this pump again ? it makes good pressure, and the components are really well built. We used a cleanable screen fuel filter instead of the supplied throw-always, ?just because??.

Trim Relay Decks ? these little things are great! I bought four of them ? one for each trim axis, and one to control flaps ? and they were cheaper than if I had bought a bunch of relays and done myself ? plus the mounting has been well thought out. They have worked great with no issues.

Fiberglass Canopy Skirt ? yes, as painful as it can be to mold up a skirt from scratch, this really seems to be the way to go ? heavier than aluminum I am sure, but it was a lot easier to get it to fit right, and boy, does it fit right! We have a small air leak on the back of the neck in some temperature conditions, but in general, it really turned out nice. We made a small modification to the canopy frame as a result of using a glass fairing and thicker canopy ? the two aluminum tubes that extend aft of the rear cross-bar simply didn?t cooperate with fitting, and we simply removed them. The canopy and skirt are stiff enough to hold themselves together and in good shape. They are pro-sealed together.

Van?s Circular Air Vents (CA LV-3 VENTILATOR) ? these are really nice little gems that operate smoothly - but the canopy skirt (where we have them) is not a great place to mount them. They generate more sound than airflow ? I am afraid they are in a low-pressure area, and don?t scoop as much are as they should. They are ?adequate?, but if I was building wings from scratch, I think I?d put a NACA scoop on the bottom, like on the -8, and bring cooling air in from there.

Heating and ventilation in general ? as mentioned above, the skirt isn?t a very good place for the vents, but it seems to be adequate. We are using a single heat muff on one of the four-pipes, and that gives a reasonable amount of heat through the firewall-mounted heat box ? at least for the lower body. Heating pads in the seat tend to keep core temps OK, but we have noticed that on a cold day, the upper body suffers if you?re not wearing a jacket and hat ? there are just simply two different climates between upper and lower cockpit areas.

Cockpit Mods and Storage ? we decided to build enclosed side consoles that will easily fit folded maps (although we don?t plan to carry paper ? it is so quaint?). These were folded out of 0.020 stock and the hinged doors were topped with mouse pad neoprene to provide padding for the arm. These have proven to be great catchalls for cables, headlamps, logbooks, etc. They are about 2.5? wide, and 6? tall. Since we mounted a radio stack between the pilot?s legs, and had a little extra space at the top, we also fabricated a glove box which provides extra enclosed space. Another simple Mod was to make the two ?step? pieces of the cockpit floor (under the pilot?s thighs) more of a complete floor which keeps things out of the control mixer. We stole this idea from Randy Lervold, and pretty much copied his idea exactly. This has to be split down the middle in order to make it removable ? especially with the side consoles in place.

Todd?s ?Tall Man? canopy ? we got this canopy with the second-hand kit we bought, and have nothing to compare it with, but we have found that it gives plenty of headroom and an outstanding view all around. It is pretty darkly tinted, which really helps keep the heat down in the cockpit. We haven?t done a lot of night flying, but the dark tint hasn?t been a problem when we have. I like the room inside ? not sure if it costs us performance, but we can run above red line straight and level, so top speed loss is not a factor?.

G3X EFIS ? I could (and have) written a whole article on this ? it is a mix of top-end hardware and well thought-out software. The feature set has been growing continuously, and has proven to put everything we want in one place. It interfaces well with the 430W, but you can also use its internal flight plan features when flying VFR ? they are quite superior to the old 430 standard. Yes, database updates are pricey, but the truth is, you don?t need to buy them all and keep everything fully up to date. Terrain doesn?t move that often. And with Foreflight on an iPad in the cockpit, you have up-to-date charts for $75/year.

Tru Trak GXPilot ? this has worked in concert with the G3X just fine ? better than me, to be honest. I am still learning some of the nuances of the interface, and how to use it all to maximum efficiency when flying ?in the system?. We used the RV-6 aileron servo mount, but had to cut down the diagonal bracket and not use a back shell on the connector due to the thinner wings on the -3. It is tight, but fits. We copied the design of the RV-8 pitch servo mount in the fuselage.

Oregon Aero Seats ? we decided to go with the top-end seats because the airplane is planned for traveling ? and so far, it has made round trips to Minnesota, California, Nevada, Florida and many points in between ? and we feel we made a good choice. One of our reasons for choosing OE was the knowledge that Randy Lervold had worked with them to get a pattern for the -3. This turned out to be a good head start, but they originally applied it upside down, which took an extra iteration to get them right before upholstery. Because we had the tall canopy, and wanted good visibility over the nose, we added a bit of height to the cushion over the ?standard? template. We are really pleased with the end product however and really like the sheepskin finish on both hot and cold days. Speaking of cold days ?we put in heating pads in both the bottom and back cushions, and they made a real difference in the winter!

Electric flaps ? we had Russ McCutcheon (who builds the standard flap levers for Van?s) make us a new flap bar without the handle but with a bracket to which we could attach an electric actuator. We then used a 12 volt linear actuator you can get just about anywhere on the internet for about $100, and installed it behind the seat. Works great, and fast ? about 4 seconds for full travel. It adds weight, but allows a more symmetrical cockpit design.
__________________
Paul F. Dye
Editor at Large - KITPLANES Magazine
RV-8 - N188PD - "Valkyrie"
RV-6 (By Marriage) - N164MS - "Mikey"
RV-3B - N13PL - "Tsamsiyu"
A&P, EAA Tech Counselor/Flight Advisor
Dayton Valley Airpark (A34)
http://Ironflight.com
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-13-2013, 08:21 PM
Ironflight's Avatar
Ironflight Ironflight is offline
VAF Moderator / Line Boy
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Dayton, NV
Posts: 12,830
Default RV-3 Modifications and Product Evaluations (Part 2)

Throttle Quadrant ? we used the DJM Deluxe quadrant with a Fatboy throttle handle. The Fatboy handle is a pistol grip (literally) that comes out at a 45 degree angle ? extremely comfortable and natural. This goes really well with our side compartments/arm rests, and makes the cockpit the most comfortable I have ever flown. DJM also sells the quadrant with the pistol grip handle now.

Tail wheel ? this is a real amalgamation, but we are very happy with it. The spring is Van?s, the fork is a Bell style from Aviation Tech Products, the steering link is a Silver bullet (no longer available), the control arm is from JDair, and the tail wheel is a lightweight with sealed bearings from DJM. The lightweight wheel saved almost a pound way back on the tail, and the steering control is very precise. I really like the ground clearance afforded by the Bell-style fork, and the fact that it uses standard van?s parts for control arms and wheels is a big plus.

Antennas ? we used two belly-mounted Comm antennas from Don Pansier, along with his transponder blade antenna ? all have worked just great so far. There is an Archer VOR antenna in the wingtip, and it gets reasonable results. The GNS 430W uses it?s own GPS antenna of course, but for the G3X we went with little portable antennas for GPS and XM for the display units. There is precious little real estate to mount antennas on the -3, and we wanted to honor the distance and view requirements for the 430WAAS antenna ? so that meant glareshield mounts for the G3X stuff. Because they use that skinny little Coax, we had to buy special crimpers and BNC (TNC for XM) connectors to crimp on after fitting them through the glareshield. The good news is that the trouble was worth it, and they look and work well.

Crow Harnesses ? we used the 3? belts and rotary buckle that they sell set up for the RV-8 (they have no idea what an RV-3 is). This meant we had to make the opening in the seat back bulkhead a little wider, but they are custom anyway, so it wasn?t a big deal. We are really glad we got pull-up adjusters for the lap belts ? much easier to snug down in the tight cockpit.

Paint ? we had Tsam painted at GLO Custom in Fort Worth, Texas. The artwork was airbrushed by Scott ?Shark? Draper, working at the GLO facility, after fiberglass prep and base coat had been done by the guys at GLO. GLO then finished up with three coats of clear on top of the art. It was a pleasure working with all of the guys, and we are very happy with the results ? time will tell how well it stands up, but the experience of working with GLO is outstanding, and re-assembly was flawless. The base coat is a slightly bluish white Jet Glo, and all of the rest of the paint came from House of Colors.

Roll Bar ? the roll bar was made by a local friend, copied in concept from Randy Lervold. It is welded steel tubing, powder-coated, and bolted to reinforcing gussets on the longerons. We determined the dimensions by mounting the canopy to make sure that not only it fit inside, but would clear the swing of the canopy when it opens ? it became apparent that just being short enough to fit under the closed canopy wasn?t enough. Careful attention to dimensions is important.


[Those are most of what I could remember, thinking back over a two and a half year build. Further questions are always welcome.]
__________________
Paul F. Dye
Editor at Large - KITPLANES Magazine
RV-8 - N188PD - "Valkyrie"
RV-6 (By Marriage) - N164MS - "Mikey"
RV-3B - N13PL - "Tsamsiyu"
A&P, EAA Tech Counselor/Flight Advisor
Dayton Valley Airpark (A34)
http://Ironflight.com
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-13-2013, 08:49 PM
David Paule David Paule is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 5,063
Default

Paul, very helpful and much appreciated!

1. Any chance for a couple pictures of the oil filler hatch?

2. Would you think that an inertia reel for the harness would be worthwhile?

3. Pro-Seal for the canopy skirt bond.... Add that to the list including 3M 5200, Sika and the more flexible West Systems epoxy, as well as that Hysol epoxy. So many choices. Pro-Seal does have its attractions, good to know it sticks and lasts. Did you use any primer or other process on the acrylic to prepare it?

Thanks very much,
Dave
RV-3B, now building tanks
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-13-2013, 09:18 PM
Ironflight's Avatar
Ironflight Ironflight is offline
VAF Moderator / Line Boy
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Dayton, NV
Posts: 12,830
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Paule View Post
Paul, very helpful and much appreciated!

1. Any chance for a couple pictures of the oil filler hatch?

2. Would you think that an inertia reel for the harness would be worthwhile?

3. Pro-Seal for the canopy skirt bond.... Add that to the list including 3M 5200, Sika and the more flexible West Systems epoxy, as well as that Hysol epoxy. So many choices. Pro-Seal does have its attractions, good to know it sticks and lasts. Did you use any primer or other process on the acrylic to prepare it?
1) I'll have to look through pictures to see what I've got - could take some time.

2) Haven't felt the need - and I like to be able to cinch things down real tight for turbulence and acro - so I don't think I'd want them unless they had a positive lock feature. And you're building light - right? They'd weigh something.....

3) No primer - it stuck (and has stayed stuck) really well! Remember that our canopy is riveted to the frame, so it is more of a gasket and gap-filler.

Paul
__________________
Paul F. Dye
Editor at Large - KITPLANES Magazine
RV-8 - N188PD - "Valkyrie"
RV-6 (By Marriage) - N164MS - "Mikey"
RV-3B - N13PL - "Tsamsiyu"
A&P, EAA Tech Counselor/Flight Advisor
Dayton Valley Airpark (A34)
http://Ironflight.com
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:33 AM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.