VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

-POSTING RULES
-Advertise in here!
- Today's Posts | Insert Pics

Keep VAF Going
Donate methods

Point your
camera app here
to donate fast.


Go Back   VAF Forums > Main > Safety
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #71  
Old 10-26-2016, 01:29 PM
gmohr gmohr is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Trenton, SC
Posts: 175
Default

I finished my transition training a week and a half ago. We used this Transition
Syllabus as our guide. I sent this to my insurance company and they thought it
was well done.
__________________
Gene Mohr
Ret. US Army
RV6A (purchased), O360, Hartzell C/S prop
Trenton, SC (S17 homebase)
Happily Donated
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 11-14-2016, 09:34 AM
Vac Vac is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Niceville, Florida
Posts: 490
Default using the RV Training Guide

Terminology. I’ve blended some civilian and military nomenclature when appropriate. The training program includes maneuver tasks beyond basic FAA requirements, and these fall into two categories: confidence maneuvers and advanced handling. Typically, some of these tasks are referred to as “upset training” or “aerobatics” in the civilian aviation community. I’ve opted to retain some USAF nomenclature since it better accommodates the structure of the training flow. I have, however, endeavored to remove as much jargon as practical through multiple edits.

Philosophy. The training materials have been developed and written to accommodate the complete cross-section of RV pilots. Not all pilots or instructors will utilize all of the material—it’s designed using a building-block approach that allows folks to accommodate individual training objectives. I have been fortunate to benefit from outstanding training in general aviation, military and airline operations, and I’ve tried to blend the best of all three to accommodate our RV community. Due to the handling and aerodynamic characteristics of RV-types, I’ve found knowledge and techniques used to fly fighters to often be applicable—in some cases more so than thought-processes and techniques utilized flying a typical production type. I’ve done my best to incorporate that knowledge and adapted applicable techniques throughout all of the training materials.

There are two approaches we can take to mitigate handling error: improving risk management and aircraft knowledge/handling skills. These approaches are inclusive, and I’ve incorporated knowledge and maneuvers designed to meet individual training needs. Three RV-specific design characteristics tend to get pilots into trouble: Low drag/rapid acceleration; limited stall warning; and reduced static margin/stability at aft CG and/or high pitch angles. Briefings and maneuvers have been specifically designed to expose pilots to these characteristics and provide appropriate handling techniques.

My work is open source. As such, I’ve incorporated as much applicable tribal knowledge as practical, and I hope that plagiarism is the best form of flattery in some cases! This project is a way to pay forward all of the help I’ve received throughout my career. I’ve been able to accomplish this with the outstanding help of folks throughout the Van’s/VAF community who have helped to edit and (worse!) had to serve as a sounding board for various topics. I hope most RV pilots will find some of the information useful.

Notes, Caution and Warning. The syllabus and maneuvers have been validated by associated flight and operational test, and in all-cases assume that Van’s specified design limits are adhered to; however, it’s important to remember that no two airplanes are identical, even of the same type. These differences can affect handling characteristics. Also, not all RV-types are capable of all of the maneuvers, or are not capable of all of the maneuvers in all load configurations. Another vital point is that these training materials are not designed to replace proper flight instruction, but rather support and supplement that. We have some outstanding transition instructors in our community. Proper training is the single best investment you can make as a pilot, regardless of your experience level.

Using the training materials. The “syllabus” was written to accommodate a broad cross-section of experience and requirements and provides extensive amounts of detailed information. It is not intended to be read cover to cover as a “how to” guide, but rather consists of three primary parts, each of which serves a different purpose. Part 1, titled “General” is really a training program management guide. This is designed for instructors, schools, clubs or other organizations that provide transition training. It contains detailed information about how to manage and conduct training, including a detailed set of criterion referenced objectives. When appropriate, these objectives in all cases mirror FAA Airman Certification Standards (Private/Instrument) and Practical Test Standards (Commercial). Additional objective criteria are included in all tracks of transition training for tasks not included in FAA standards (e.g., some confidence maneuvers and all advanced handling tasks). This complete set of objectives is designed to provide instructors with an assessment tool as well as providing a baseline set of standards, should there be a desire or need to quantify performance during training or operations. The various tracks are designed to include risk management and RV-specific knowledge and flying tasks in each block of training. The five-hour baseline transition track was designed to accommodate typical insurance company requirements. All tracks of instruction, lesson plans, briefings, etc. can be modified or adjusted as needs dictate.

Part 1 also contains a set of “training rules.” Training rules are employed by the military and are best thought of as a set of operating limitations designed to accommodate the skill-set required by the associated training objectives. Training rules form some of the bed-rock of what military aviators refer to as “flight discipline.” The training rules in Part 1 are designed for use during basic, VFR transition training. They accommodate the building-block training approach and can assist pilots with developing their own individual set of rules that can assist with risk management as experience and follow-on training are achieved. If FAA standards contain any rules (e.g., maneuvering floor), they are incorporated in the syllabus training rules. Training rules are presented in a bullet format and are designed to referenced during instructional briefings.

Part 2 of the “syllabus” contains lesson plans and briefing guides. Lesson plans (and associated gradesheets) are written to assist instructors manage the content, scope and duration of a training flight. Briefing guides are provided to assist instructors providing academics to transition students and other upgrading instructors. They are also a good reference for transitioning students/instructors. They cover risk management, RV-specific aerodynamics, performance, and weight and balance as well as EAB airworthiness determination. The information in the briefings mirrors the information contained in the text in other portions of the training guide and they serve as an excellent “30,000 foot overview” if reviewed in conjunction with Appendixes B (RV-type Handling Briefing) and C (RV-type handling rules of thumb).

Part 3 is the meat of the document for transitioning pilots and upgrading instructors. It is designed as a detailed operating handbook, since some RV-types do not have any such document (nor is one required by regulation). To the extent that RV’s are similar within the “design families,” as much generic data as practical is incorporated. The normal procedures and emergency procedures sections are written in a description/checklist format that is designed to be adopted by pilots in the field and customized to suit their specific airplanes should there be a need or desire to do so. Basic RV-specific IFR considerations are addressed in the all-weather operations section, which also contains information about cold-weather operations, operation in rain and snow and contaminated runway considerations. The handling characteristics section is a detailed text addressing “how RV’s fly.” Much of the tribal knowledge in this section was culled from flight test, RVator articles, VAF and earlier Matronix web-communities, appropriate manufacturer, FAA and military texts and is designed to provide a basic reference regarding handling characteristics of RV-types. The last two portions of Part 3 are detailed “how to” sections that describe how to fly various maneuvers.

Appendix A is an example of a personal proficiency program. Appendix B is an advanced handling briefing guide which is similar to a guide we would use in the military to provide a briefing for a basic “how to fly the airplane” training or proficiency flight. For a pilot fully versed in all aspects of RV flight, it provides a start to finish overview of all of the training elements contained throughout the syllabus. And, like the rest of the document, it’s best thought of as a smorgasbord: pick and choose the elements that are appropriate to what you are trying to accomplish. Appendix C is a compilation of RV-type handling rules of thumb.

Parting thought. When a student asks a question, my initial response is generally “what does the book say?” and I’m always a bit taken aback when the response is “I don’t know.” It was smartly suggested to me by folks here in our VAF community that I ought to develop a means to easily access information, which is why the table of contents and various portions of the document contain hyperlinks. Learning to fly isn’t easy, it requires study, effort, discipline, learning from mistakes (not only our own, but those of others as well!) and the ability to power-through when we aren’t having a good day—which happens to ALL of us. One of my goals in this project has been to provide a “book” for our community so that when a question arises, there is a reference that provides at least one possible RV-specific answer—but, in many cases not the only answer. This is why discussions that we have on this web site and with our fellow aviators can be so valuable for our community.

The bottom line is that I hope many RV pilots find some of the information helpful.

Fly safe and enjoy the RV grin—it’s why we’re here after all!

Vac
__________________
Mike Vaccaro
RV-4 2112
Niceville, Florida

Last edited by Vac : 11-14-2016 at 09:52 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 11-15-2016, 09:39 AM
esco esco is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: SoCal
Posts: 407
Default Soft copy, pls

Mike:

PM sent - requesting a soft copy.

thx!
__________________
______
VAF dues paid though exempt
RV-9A sold (I miss that bird!)
RV10 sold (miss that one too!)
RV-14A build underway
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old 12-08-2016, 08:37 AM
Vac Vac is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Niceville, Florida
Posts: 490
Default Powerpoint Briefings

Hi Folks!

I'm developing powerpoint briefings for instructional or reference use during transition training as a first step to improving the resources available for folks either teaching in or learning to fly RV's. The basic transition/instructor upgrade syllabus contains four RV-specific briefings as well as basic risk and error management briefings. The flying briefings include RV-type Aerodynamics; Performance; Weight and Balance and Airworthiness Determination.

The first step is to develop the basic slides for each brief and then, enhance them with appropriate hyperlinks, video, graphics, etc. to improve them over time.

I've finished up Version 1.0 of the Aerodynamics Briefing: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8E...ew?usp=sharing

I chose .pdf format due to it's ubiquitous application--especially for folks that may be using an IOS device; but I'm sure that there may be a different format that will work better and accommodate more features in the future as I learn more about developing net-based resources.

As always, I'm happy to share the .pptx file with anyone that would like a copy to adopt for themselves--just drop an e-mail or PM. And I'm always also happy to collaborate with anyone that wants to assist in editing or otherwise improving these training resources for our community. I appreciate any ideas, feedback or critique.

Fly safe and best wishes for the Holidays!

Vac
__________________
Mike Vaccaro
RV-4 2112
Niceville, Florida
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old 01-22-2017, 09:48 AM
Vac Vac is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Niceville, Florida
Posts: 490
Default RV Performance Briefing

Happy 2017!

I've finished up the initial version of the RV-type Performance Briefing. A PDF version suitable for iPad, etc., can be downloaded here:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8E...ew?usp=sharing

If you'd like a PowerPoint (PPT) formatted copy, drop a PM or email with your email address, and I'll be happy to forward a copy. As always, any corrections, critiques or suggestions are appreciated--and I'll incorporate them into updated versions.

Fly Safe,

Vac
__________________
Mike Vaccaro
RV-4 2112
Niceville, Florida
Reply With Quote
  #76  
Old 01-26-2017, 03:31 PM
acroflyrgirl acroflyrgirl is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 406
Default Worth the price of admission, indeed!

Wow, in the middle of a long layover while browsing VAF (to postpone going to the gym) I found this gem. I read through all 8 pages and the 4 Pages from a related link. I've downloaded all of these incredible docs that Vac has posted.

I'm almost looking forward to the big headwind going back west tonight so I can peruse what I've got saved here on my iPad. Wonderful resourse material. Thank you Vac.

It amazes me the generosity of this exceptional group. I'm a civilian pilot, getting to absorb from a group so diverse.
My "gang" of formation mentors give of their time freely, the MIL among them indulge me in some BCM and ACM, all without a 6+yr comminment to Uncle Sam.....and no one is shooting at me.

Cathy
__________________
RV6 aka; Pop Tart
Reply With Quote
  #77  
Old 03-12-2017, 06:13 PM
Vac Vac is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Niceville, Florida
Posts: 490
Default RV Weight and Balance Academic Briefing

Folks,

I've finished up the first draft of the RV Weight and Balance Academic Briefing that is designed to support transition training. As with the other briefings, I've made it available in a downloadable PDF format here:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8E...ew?usp=sharing

There are hyperlinks in the briefing that will work in the PDF format if wireless or data access is available. The PDF format works well on portable devices, so I've chosen that as a baseline, but if anyone would like a .pptx (PowerPoint) version, please drop a line (PM me with an email address to send the file to, or just email me directly at vacf15 at yahoo dot com).

The next briefing will be RV/EAB Airworthiness Determination and Maintenance Practices.

Although the briefings are designed for instructor's providing transition training to their students, they can also be used at chapter meetings or just as fodder for starting hangar discussion with your local RV'ers. They are also a good overview or review of the topics if you're still learning (or re-learning!) your RV.

Since these power point briefings are a more recent product, in some cases they reflect improvement over the briefing guides in the transition training manual itself. As soon as I finish up the baseline set, I'll go back and revise the appropriate text for folks that prefer that format.

Fly Safe!

Vac
__________________
Mike Vaccaro
RV-4 2112
Niceville, Florida
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 03-13-2017, 08:34 AM
ChiefPilot's Avatar
ChiefPilot ChiefPilot is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 1,580
Thumbs up

This looks great! I especially appreciate the slide that addresses the myth around fuel in the wing and aerobatic gross weight. Even Van's SB didn't seem to convince some that it's an issue so continued effort at getting the word out is awesome!

I also liked the description of pitch stability at aft CG. I explored this area with a couple of test cards during phase one and pitch forces are indeed very light. Moreover, I noted a very slight reversal approaching the positive load limit. Not a place where many RVs operate, but it was interesting nonetheless.

Question - the slide titled "Flying Heavy" states that stall speed, glide performance, and stick forces are altered when overweight, which is absolutely true, but there is also a follow-on that states these are exacerbated at high density altitudes. I may be mis-remembering my aero-e coursework, but I don't think the indicated stall speed for a given weight will change based on density altitude. Did I mis-read that?

Thanks!
__________________
Brad Benson, Maplewood MN.
RV-6A N164BL, Flying since Nov 2012!
If you're not making mistakes, you're probably not making anything

Last edited by ChiefPilot : 03-13-2017 at 08:40 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #79  
Old 03-13-2017, 12:29 PM
Vac Vac is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Niceville, Florida
Posts: 490
Default

Brad,

You are correct. Poor choice on the wording of the sub-bullet. I'm actually paraphrasing Van's article "Flying Heavy" from the RVator on this slide, and the point is that density altitude is yet another risk to consider, but for a given weight and G-loading, IAS for stall is not affected by density altitude.

I'll make the appropriate change to clarify!

I really appreciate you taking the time to post--this is truly an interactive project; and improves as a group effort!

Thank you,

Vac
__________________
Mike Vaccaro
RV-4 2112
Niceville, Florida
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old 03-13-2017, 05:19 PM
Ed_Wischmeyer's Avatar
Ed_Wischmeyer Ed_Wischmeyer is offline
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Savannah, GA
Posts: 1,573
Default

Good stuff! Lots of gotchas in the experimental world aren't known to those transitioning.

Ed
__________________
RV-9A at KSAV (Savannah, GA; dual G3X Touch with autopilot, GTN650, GTX330ES, GDL52 ADSB-In)
Previously RV-4, RV-8, RV-8A, AirCam, Cessna 175
ATP CFII PhD, so I have no excuses when I screw up
Vaccines kept me out of the hospital but COVID still cost me a month of living, all told...
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:28 AM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.